Corsair Ships Nova And Reactor 2.5" SSD Lines

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News Posted: Fri, Feb 26 2010 8:15 AM
Already, Corsair? For the second time this month, one of the most highly regarded storage and memory companies in existence has issued new solid state drives, and it's beginning to feel as if we're seeing more SSD introductions than HDD introductions. We know that solid state still has quite some ways to go before it catches up to the traditional HDD in terms of sales, but it's clear that companies are behind it 100%. Now to get those prices down to a reasonable level....

Today, both the Nova and Reactor series are making their debut, which utilize JMicron JMF612 and Indilinx BarefootT controller technologies along with Windows 7 TRIM support. The Reactor series ships in 60GB and 120GB capacities and uses the JMicron controller, which incorporates 128MB of DDR2 cache memory. The 120GB Reactor delivers speeds of up to 250MB/sec read and 170MB/sec write, and the 60GB has the same read speed while stepping down to just 110MB/sec write.

The Nova series utilizes the Indilinx Barefoot controller with 64MB of cache memory, and it comes in 64GB and 128GB sizes. Speeds on these are faster, with the 128GB Nova reacing 270MB/sec (read) and 190MB/sec (write). Both ranges are shipping now from Corsair's website, and a two-year warranty is included.


Corsair® Launches Reactor and Nova Series Solid-State Drives

New SSDs utilize JMicron JMF612 and Indilinx BarefootT controller technologies to deliver exceptional price/performance and Windows® 7TRIM support

FREMONT, California, February 26, 2009 - Corsair,a worldwide leader in high-performance computer and flash memoryproducts, today announced the addition of the Reactor Series and NovaSeries to its family of solid-state drives (SSDs). Both the Nova Seriesand Reactor Series provide the performance benefits of solid-state technology at an attractive cost per gigabyte.

TheReactor Series, including 60GB and 120GB drive capacities, is built using the new JMicron JMF612 controller. This second-generation controller from JMicron incorporates 128MB of DDR2 cache memory for stutter-free performance. The 120GB Reactor Series SSD delivers speeds of up to 250MB/s read and 170MB/s write, while the 60GB Reactor SeriesSSD features speeds up to 250MB/s read and 110 MB/s write.

The Nova Series is built using the popular Indilinx Barefoot controller with 64MB of cache memory, and is offered in drive sizes of 64GB and 128GB. The 128GB Nova Series SSD is able to achieve speeds of up to270MB/second read and 190MB/second write, while the 64GB Nova Series SSD delivers speeds up to 270MB/s read and 130MB/s write.

Both Reactor Series and Nova Series SSDs fully support the TRIM command inMicrosoft Windows 7 operating systems, which automatically maintains optimal performance over the lifetime of the drives.

The Reactor Series and Nova Series are available immediately from Corsair's authorized distributors and resellers worldwide and are backed by a Two-Year Limited Warranty. Complete customer support via telephone,email, forum and Tech Support Express is also available.

About Corsair
Founded in 1994,Corsair specializes in premium, high-performance peripherals andcomponents for personal computers. Corsair's award-winning products arethe delight of the world's most demanding hardware enthusiasts. Formore information, visit corsair.com.

Copyright© 2010Corsair. All rights reserved. All company and/or product names may betrade names, trademarks, and/or registered trademarks of the respectiveowners with which they are associated. Features, pricing, availability,and specifications are subject to change without notice
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Zestia replied on Fri, Feb 26 2010 9:54 AM

I think Zuzu Bailey said it best, "Every time a new SSD gets to market, an angel gets his wings". Ok, perhaps I embellish but that's how I feel because increased competition yields a better product at a lower price. Currently, SSDs can be purchased at an approximate price point of $3-$4/GB. That's a bit pricey for the average enthusiast. I'd like to know at what price point do you think the consumer begins to abandon the traditional HDD en mass. The 10,000 rpm Velociraptors currently sell for approximately $1.5/GB and there's good demand for these. So here's my very unscientific prediction...HDD sales will plummet once the SSD price point drops below $2/GB in about 12 to 18 months. What's your guess?

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HDD sales won't plummet too far though. At least, not until SSD's can be found in the same size or larger then HDD's without costing more than your house.

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More SSDs competing does not necessarily lower SSD costs much, since the vast majority of the cost of an SSD is in the NAND flash memory, and the SSD makers are not going to sell SSDs below the cost of the NAND flash.

And there are only 2 big producers of NAND flash: IMFT and Samsung. To reduce SSD cost a lot the real need is more NAND flash producing fabs.

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Intel and Micron are both ramping up production of 25nm NAND flash. This is cheaper and higher density then what is currently on the market so hopefully it will help bring the cost down some.

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IMFT is the Intel-Micron Flash Technologies alliance. And since IMFT says they are 1 year ahead of the competition with 25nm NAND flash, it is unlikely that there will be any serious competition until perhaps 2012. And without competition, the price is not likely to come down quickly. Corporations do not lower prices because they can -- they only do it when they must, because of competition.

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Zestia replied on Fri, Feb 26 2010 11:49 AM

I agree with both of you but ultimately, SSD manufacturers will want to make their products available to a much wider segment of the market and unless the price point drops that will be a prolonged process. So let's assume that the price point will eventually become more affordable. What is your prediction as to the price point and time frame that the average consumer abandons HDDs for SSDs?

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I think your question is flawed. I do not see consumers abandoning HDDs in the near future. HDDs and SSDs are complementary. Already, many people use an SSD for the OS and commonly used applications to improve performance, but HDDs for storing large quantities of files, like video collections, since the cost per GB for SSDs is too high for archiving or streaming video files.

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Zestia replied on Fri, Feb 26 2010 12:38 PM

If I understand you correctly, your contention is that SSDs will never be priced low enough to replace HDDs.  Consequently, the average consumer will at worst never abandon the HDD and at best always use both, correct?

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I would not say 'never'. I said precisely what I meant. To repeat, in the near future, I think that HDDs will be used together with SSDs -- HDDs for high-capacity storage with modest performance requirements, and SSDs for lower-capacity storage with high performance requirements.

As for whether HDDs will ever be completely replaced by some form of solid state storage, it is possible but there is a long way to go. HDDs are about $0.075 per GB right now, while it is tough to find an SSD below $2 per GB. That is more than a factor of 26 to overcome. If the factor decreases 2x every year, it would take about 5 years to equalize. But that means that the SSD prices have to decrease MORE than a factor of 2 every year for five years, since HDD prices will surely continue to decrease in the meantime. I think such a decrease is unlikely unless a new form of solid state storage becomes practical -- revolutionary, not evolutionary.

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Zestia replied on Fri, Feb 26 2010 1:39 PM

Fair enough - I believe you've answered my question about as well as you intend to. Thanks.

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rapid1 replied on Sat, Feb 27 2010 3:17 AM

Those are some great names for SSD's. I wonder when we will see some price control busts in the SSD market like we have seen with many other device type such as LCD monitors.

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mhenriday replied on Sat, Feb 27 2010 9:00 AM

In addition to price, other questions, such as performance degradation, remain with regard to SSDs. Or have they all, unbeknownst to me, been resolved ?...

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Supposedly degradation isn't much of a problem anymore, at least that's what I've been hearing. I too believed that it was a strong negative, but times are changing.

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mhenriday replied on Sat, Feb 27 2010 12:40 PM

Can anyone provide any links to competent recent discussions on this matter ? I'd very much like to keep my knowledge of the situation up to date !...

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