Nvidia Eases Users into DIY Scene with GeForce PC Kit

rated by 0 users
This post has 9 Replies | 1 Follower

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 24,884
Points 1,116,980
Joined: Sep 2007
ForumsAdministrator
News Posted: Tue, Feb 23 2010 11:53 AM
As power users, we sometimes take for granted the process of putting together a new PC. For most of you reading this, rolling your own rig is old hat by now, but not everyone falls into this category. If we think back to our very first build, most of us would agree that the concept was a little daunting at first, at least until it came time to dive in and plug all the parts in.

We can preach how it easy it is to build your own machine until we're blue in the face, but none of it matters until you take that leap and find out for yourself. Hoping to push you in that direction, Nvidia has put together a DIY bundle they're calling the GeForce PC Kit. Here's what you get:

ProcessorIntel® Pentium E5300
Operating SystemNot Included
Supports (Windows XP, Vista, 7)
Memory2 GB DDR2
Graphics CardNVIDIA® GeForce® 9800 GT
Hard Drive3.5” SATA 250 GB (7200 rpm)
Optical DriveDVD R/RW
Power Supply500 Watts
NetworkingIntegrated 10/100 Ethernet, No wireless LAN
Keyboard and MouseMicrosoft keyboard and mouse
ChassisCoolerMaster Elite 334 NVIDIA Edition
Front Productivity Ports2 USB, 1 Audio
Back Ports1 Serial port
1 VGA port
1 LAN 
4 USB 2.0 Ports
3/6 Flex Audio Jacks
1 PS/2 mouse port
1 PS/2 keyboard port
AudioIntegrated 7.1 channel sound with front audio ports
DimensionsD 19.1” x W 8.0” x H 16.3”
 

We can already hear the groans from those of you who were hoping for a Core i5 foundation, or even an AM3 setup if shooting for a low-budget build. But if you can get past the pedestrian parts and dated socket (LGA775), Nvidia's done something pretty neat and unique here, which we hope they will continue to do. The GeForce PC Kit successfully bridges the gap between the DIY scene and a pre-built rig, giving weary would-be builders a boost of confidence in knowing that the parts they're buying will all be compatible.



The motherboard comes with the CPU and cooler already installed; it's up to you to put everything else together and shove it all into the Cooler Master case. Nvidia also includes a screwdriver to save you from fumbling around your toolbox for the right size Phillips-head, so all you need to add is a monitor, OS, and a bit of elbow grease.



Nvidia's GeForce PC Kit is available now for $500 from CompUSA and TigerDirect (both Systemax subsidiaries).
  • | Post Points: 95
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 5,048
Points 60,675
Joined: May 2008
Location: U.S.
Moderator
3vi1 replied on Tue, Feb 23 2010 1:34 PM

"All the benefit of not getting to custom choose each part, the fun of paying the one price we dictate, and the added excitement of having to put it together yourself while you learn what static electricity does to memory chips."

Ohhh... that's why I'm not an Ad-man.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 4,796
Points 45,500
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Kennesaw
rapid1 replied on Tue, Feb 23 2010 1:49 PM

Yes that is a very good point 3vi1. However; for an initial builder it is positive I guess. Even tough as you note it in several ways takes away from the experience considerably to me and you. To a brand spanking new builder, or a customer who see's this they might then say I could do that, and become over time like many of us. I have built many PC's over the years, and worked on thousands. But, for many it is a daunting task to enter in to. So I can see this as a good thing, although I think the component particularly the MB, Memory amount, and CPU are also putting a customer who buys this at a direct and initial disadvantage. There is also the confidence in knowing there getting all the right parts as well as, and as I said before building there first PC. I personally love building them (I still need to do a fully custom built MOD case), but an initialization to building for a general consumer this is good.

 Machine name: rapid1
 Operating System: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit (6.1, Build 7600) 
 System Model: Gigabyte X58A-UD5
 Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU         930  @ 2.80GHz (8 CPUs), ~3.6GHz
 Memory: Kingston 6144MB RAM
  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Posts 3,735
Points 40,310
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: New York
Inspector replied on Tue, Feb 23 2010 3:45 PM

:D this was in the newsletter they sent out by email a few days ago. I wouldn't buy this but for some one that wants to put the parts together themselves but not choose the parts its alright i guess.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 5,048
Points 60,675
Joined: May 2008
Location: U.S.
Moderator
3vi1 replied on Tue, Feb 23 2010 3:46 PM

I see your point, and don't disagree... I'm just afraid that people using this won't actually learn anything about picking components and will therefore know almost as little as when they started.  It seems to me that the best thing about building your own system is all the incidental knowledge you gain through research while trying to understand the various standards.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 4,796
Points 45,500
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Kennesaw
rapid1 replied on Tue, Feb 23 2010 3:58 PM

Yeah I agree with both of you on this. Some of the funnest parts of putting together a system at least to me is selection. I could probably put one together with my eyes closed in a half hour except for applying thermal to the CPU. But finding out whats awesome, but still in my budget, and then ordering it and building the best I can is the best part of the whole thing. For a fresh new builder though who just wanted to grab there first system with no issues I see the point in it.

 Machine name: rapid1
 Operating System: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit (6.1, Build 7600) 
 System Model: Gigabyte X58A-UD5
 Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU         930  @ 2.80GHz (8 CPUs), ~3.6GHz
 Memory: Kingston 6144MB RAM
  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Posts 3,735
Points 40,310
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: New York
Inspector replied on Tue, Feb 23 2010 9:04 PM

by the way a quote from origin pc "Just because anyone can build a PC, doesn't mean they should" Big Smile lol

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 50 Contributor
Posts 2,851
Points 40,550
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: United States, New York
Moderator

Wow are those lousy specs or what.    As mentioned, this defeats the purpose of DIY as a whole.  Half the work is done for you, especially seating the heatsink.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Posts 639
Points 7,630
Joined: Jul 2009
ClemSnide replied on Wed, Feb 24 2010 10:16 AM

>If we think back to our very first build, most of us would agree that the concept was a little daunting at first, at least until it came time to dive in and plug all the parts in.

"Until?" Try until, during, and after. I thought I had foreseen all of the problems I'd run into in my first complete build; then ran into the Megahalems vs. RAM heatsink issue, the fact that the USB and Firewire PCI cards' internal headers stuck out so much that I couldn't put them next to each other; and the reluctance of the case's tool-free design to work with a double-width graphics card.

Of the whole process, though, I'd have to say that the greatest challenge was installing the CPU and heatsink. Spreading on just enough thermal paste, wondering if I got it right... I can definitely see the market for a product like this. And hey, the confidence it gives you will lead you to build a system completely from scratch that has an actual state-of-the-art CPU! (The old one can be used for L4P.) For five hundred beans, it bets what some of the system builders are trying to push.


"I didn't cry when Bambi's mother was shot... but I cried when HAL was turned off."

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 862
Points 10,995
Joined: Apr 2008
RyuGTX replied on Wed, Feb 24 2010 3:09 PM

To me, this seems pretty similar to what Newegg is offering in terms of their bundles. Instead of like a 2 item bundle, they started doing bundles that include pretty much everything (just like this Nvidia kit). The nice one about Newegg is that it at least has a good number of bundles at different price points.

If you think you can’t do something, you’ll never be able to do it. No matter how easy it is.
  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (10 items) | RSS