Toshiba Develops 1TB SSD That Fits On A Postage Stamp

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News Posted: Fri, Feb 12 2010 11:24 AM
SSDs are still overpriced for most average consumers, but the companies responsible for making them are constantly searching for ways to make them larger (in terms of capacity), smaller (in terms of form factor) and cheaper (in terms of real dollars). Toshiba has their own line of solid state drives right now, but just as the company has innovated in the optical storage department, they're also hoping to innovate in the world of NAND storage.

A new partnership between the company and Tokyo's Keio University has led to the creation of a new technology that could allow SSDs up to 1TB in size to be made "with a footprint no larger than a postage stamp." That's far, far smaller than even the 1.8" drives that currently reside in the larger iPod units, and exponentially smaller than the 2.5" SSDs that are shipping now for existing notebooks.



 
Toshiba's Tadahiro Kuroda
The report states that the two have been able to integrate 128GB NAND Flash chips and a single controller into a stamp-sized form factor.  They have even made it operational with transfer rates of 2Gbps (or 250MB/sec) with data transfer that relies on short-range, electromagnetic communication. Somehow, they even claim to have made it 70% more power efficient than the average 2.5" SSD, making it cheaper to operate as well.  The company expects to be able to produce a proof of concept application-ready version sometime in 2012.  The main issue right now is that there's no industry standard in place for this type of technology, so it could be difficult to gain acceptance from PC makers and the like. Of course devices will get smaller as time goes on, and we could easily see this being the go-to drive for the next generation of portable media players and possibly even netbooks. Unfortunately, there's no mention of a consumer product release date just yet, but we're guessing it'll be a few years still. 


Toshiba's 64GB NAND Flash Chip

Regardless, it's easy to see where the industry is going with Solid State Drive technologies.  Eventually, with the level of resource behind its development, storage as we know it will transition completely over to the SSD, similar to the way of the vacuum tube transistor so many years ago.
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ClemSnide replied on Sat, Feb 13 2010 9:02 PM

>Toshiba Develops 1TB SSD That Fits On A Postage Stamp

This sounds great, but... what's this "postage stamp?"


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Impressive! Would be amazing for a portable media player full of HD movies.

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gibbersome replied on Sat, Feb 13 2010 10:08 PM

Haha Clem. Perhaps the dimensions of the Postage stamp should have been better defined, but by any rate, this is going to be a significant size reducation over current SSDs. Now about the price...

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Schmich replied on Sat, Feb 13 2010 11:11 PM

"The main issue right now is that there's no industry standard in place, so it could be difficult to gain acceptance from PC makers and the like."

The main issue really? So if it wasn't for that they would pretty much start selling it?

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rapid1 replied on Sun, Feb 14 2010 12:37 AM

Hmm I am seriously dismayed on this maybe the meant some other measurement of size. The reason I say it is because if the size is so minuscule, but it will hold and entire terabyte. In the least that sound very far fetched!

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Schmich:

"The main issue right now is that there's no industry standard in place, so it could be difficult to gain acceptance from PC makers and the like."

The main issue really? So if it wasn't for that they would pretty much start selling it?

 

Good point, I was rather wondering about that comment myself.

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Soupstyle replied on Sun, Feb 14 2010 12:33 PM

When this technology is put into a drive costs under $5000, then we might have news.

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ttvinko replied on Sun, Feb 14 2010 8:39 PM

OH wow, Thats some pretty cool stuff dude?

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Bighorse replied on Sun, Feb 14 2010 8:56 PM

Its amazing how technology just keeps changing and improving at such alarming rates. SSD are gonna evolve way faster than what Hard drives have. Just wish they would get me a 120 or 250Gb SSD for around 200 bucks.

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Dr. Phlox replied on Sun, Feb 14 2010 10:19 PM

Just three words... Bio-neural gel packs

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"exponentionally smaller"? What a kinked figure of speech. Sounds like some hack trying to sound fancy but graphically failing math instead.

What would be useful to know is what this "short-range, electromagnetic communication" thing entails. That something like bluetooth-attached-storage, no? In other words, the technology is as promiscuous with my data as an open AP or a whispered bt carkit, or, what the heck, a NFC wallet, or a biometric RFID passport.

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rapid1 replied on Mon, Feb 15 2010 12:00 AM

However think about this if it is this small or even the size of a CPU, only thinner. They could put one in your ID which contained all your info, bank accounts SSN DL CC BD address medical allergies and on and on.

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ClemSnide replied on Mon, Feb 15 2010 1:25 AM

@rapid1: It's available already. In fact, the memory-card ID was supposed to be the future of ID cards, except that it got overtaken by the cheaper mag-strip card, which of course contains a minimum of information; it requires a network, or at least an attached host, to look up whatever portion of your database applies.

In any case, you could probably fit any personal information into 64 Megabytes; a Terabyte is overkill.

Of course, if you're the sort who absolutely has to have all your high-resolution X-ray scans from the time you popped into the midwife's hands, well... I hope I don't sit next to you on the bus. .)


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Dave_HH replied on Mon, Feb 15 2010 9:38 AM

Hey Phat Controller, thanks for the kind words there bud. :) As Editor here I'll take exception to that. Something can definitely be exponentially smaller... Google the phrase if you like. :) And the communications note in the article speaks to a method of radio communication that they haven't detailed publicly, probably because it's proprietary.

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Dave_HH replied on Mon, Feb 15 2010 9:41 AM

Dr. Phlox:

Just three words... Bio-neural gel packs

I'll take three!

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Inspector replied on Mon, Feb 15 2010 3:09 PM

what are Bio-neural gel packs? O.o

i googled it and it was somehting form star trek but what does it do... Smile

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rapid1 replied on Wed, Feb 17 2010 12:41 AM

True Clem but I was not particularly thinking of that, but having x-rays and personal medical records might not be a totally bad add. Think about it your on vacation somewhere and get hit by a car or some other accident. You get to the hospital knocked out in an ambulance and all they have to do is scan your ID and know everything about you. Either way I was being factitious when I made the comment. If you think about it though you could have everything from as fast swipe fuel card to a credit card to an international ID and all your medical records and pretty much anything else you wanted or needed on an ID like that.

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rapid1 replied on Wed, Feb 17 2010 12:42 AM

Plus every music track you ever listened to or owned in your life and a micro USB adapter on your ID.

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rapid1 replied on Sat, Feb 20 2010 3:23 AM

Hey Clem it kind of sucks that they chose the magnetic strip as well. The magnetic strip contains very little info by itself. Yes it will hold ID so a Government computer could look you up. There is basically no more functionality to it really.

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natnat replied on Sat, Feb 20 2010 5:50 AM

First, the chips used are probably 128Gb, not 128GB.

Second, the big story to me is that chips are communicating by EM transmissions, not by hard wires. Has anyone else done this before? This should help connect any set of chips, as long as they don't run hot.

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Steven replied on Thu, Mar 17 2011 5:19 PM

1 or more Tb SSD on board the CPU ? :)

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Steven replied on Thu, Mar 17 2011 5:49 PM

How about a CPU made with this NAND tech with 1Tb Ram 16Tb SSD Hard Drive on board a single chip ? :)

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When will they perfect this Solid State Drive? And why does it have to use Electromagnetic Communication?

Also, could you combine this with Memristors?

@Steven Hard-Drives and Solid-State Drives are entirely different things. Hard-Drive is another term for Hard-Disk. Hard-Disks are magnetic and have moving parts. Solid-State Drives are one single non-magnetic component with no moving parts.

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Steven replied on Thu, Jun 23 2011 7:09 PM

@ Amaroq Dricaldari Thank You for the heads up. I was trying to say put the ram and hard drive on a single chip maby we can get faster access and with 1 tb ram on disk you would doubtfully need to have page files.

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