Intel Launches Itanium 9300 CPU For "Mission-Critical" Applications

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News Posted: Mon, Feb 8 2010 2:13 PM
It's easy to forget just how huge of a company Intel is when focusing solely on the consumer aspect of things, but today's announcement definitely helps to put things in perspective. Intel's chips are in everything from set-top boxes to netbooks to notebooks to hardcore gaming rigs. And they're even in some pretty classified systems within governments and other behind-the-scenes private agencies.

The new Itanium 9300 isn't geared for your next nettop. Instead, it's designed to launch NASA's next rocket. Or something of that sort. The new processor was previously known under the codename of Tukwila and it is said to "deliver  more than double the performance of its predecessor, boosts scalability and adds reliability features to the Itanium platform that is already running mission-critical applications for 80 percent of the Global 100 corporations."

The chip contains two billion transistors, and it has double the cores of the unit it's replacing (four versus two),  eight threads per processor (through enhanced Intel Hyper-Threading Technology), more cache, up to 800 percent the interconnect bandwidth, up to 500 percent the memory bandwidth, and up to 700 percent the memory capacity using-industry standard DDR3 components.

The Itanium® 9300 processor series and the future Intel® Xeon® processor, codenamed "Nehalem EX," share several platform ingredients, including the Intel® QuickPath Interconnect, the Intel Scalable Memory Interconnect, the Intel® 7500 Scalable Memory Buffer (to take advantage of industry standard DDR3 memory), and I/O hub (Intel® 7500 chipset). The Intel Itanium processor 9300 series ranges in price from $946 to $3,838 in quantities of 1,000, with OEM systems expected to ship within 90 days. This means that these chips won't be cheap (not even close), but unless you're in the server market, you can safely continue saving your pennies for the Core i7 Extreme.


Intel® Itanium® 9300 Processor Raises Bar for Scalable, Resilient Mission-Critical Computing

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS


  • Eighty percent of the Global 100 corporations have chosen Itanium®-based servers for their most mission-critical applications.
  • More than double the performance of the previous Itanium processor.1
  • Moreroom for growth with up to an 800 percent increase in systeminterconnect bandwidth, up to a 500 percent gain in memory bandwidthand up to 700 percent more memory capacity.
  • Evenbetter support for mission-critical environments with reliability,availability, and serviceability enhancements throughout the processorand platform.
  • Common platformingredients with Intel® Xeon® processors foster innovation, designsynergy, manufacturing efficiency and flexibility for customers.
 

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 8, 2010 – Intel Corporation today introduced the Itanium®processor 9300 series, previously codenamed "Tukwila," which deliversmore than double the performance of its predecessor, boosts scalabilityand adds reliability features to the Itanium platform that is alreadyrunning mission-critical applications for 80 percent of the Global 100corporations.

With theGartner Group predicting a 650 percent growth in IT data over the next5 years, businesses need increasingly powerful and scalable enterpriseservers. The two-billion transistor Itanium processor 9300 series meetsthis need head on with twice as many cores as its predecessor (fourversus two), eight threads per processor (through enhanced Intel®Hyper-Threading Technology), more cache, up to 800 percent theinterconnect bandwidth, up to 500 percent the memory bandwidth, and upto 700 percent the memory capacity using-industry standard DDR3components.

Critical corporate workloads also demand high-availability featuresacross all platform components. The Itanium processor 9300 series addsto the architecture's world-class resiliency with new reliability,availability, and serviceability (RAS) features that extend across theprocessor, its Intel® QuickPath Interconnect technology, and the memory subsystem.

The processor's advanced machine-check architecture coordinateserror handling across the hardware, firmware and operating system, andimproves system availability by enabling recovery from otherwise fatalerrors.

The Itanium 9300 processor employs the second generation of Intel®Virtualization Technology to improve performance and robustness. ItsIntel® 7500 chipset can directly assign I/O devices to virtualmachines, further boosting efficiency.

Built for the future of mission-critical computing


"Intel is committed to delivering a new era of mission-criticalcomputing, and we are delighted 80 percent of Global 100 companies havechosen Itanium®-based servers for their most demanding workloads," saidKirk Skaugen, vice president Intel Architecture Group and generalmanager Data Center Group. "Intel is continuing to drive the economicsof Moore's Law into mission-critical computing with today's Itanium9300 processor announcement, more than doubling performance for ourcustomers once again."

"Customers need a flexible technology infrastructure that canefficiently and quickly meet changing mission-critical demands," saidMartin Fink, senior vice president and general manager, BusinessCritical Systems, HP. "Intel's Itanium processor 9300 series, combinedwith HP Integrity servers, helps customers achieve new levels ofscalability and resiliency with advanced virtualization capabilities tomeet those needs."

CNAF, the French Family Allowance Service with 30 millionbeneficiaries, has chosen to adopt Bull's latest NovaScale GCOSItanium-based servers. Gérard Russeil, CNAF chief information officer,said, "The Bull Itanium-based systems have consistently provided thereliability and availability that our mission-critical workloaddemands. Our testing shows that the Itanium 9300 processor's additionalthroughput and performance will enable us to consolidate multiple datacenters into one."

Mission-critical computing for the next decade


OEM systems based on the Intel Itanium processor 9300 series will bebinary-compatible with existing software and can provide majorperformance improvements without the need for additional softwareoptimization.

"Poulson," codename for the next Itanium processor, will add anadvanced multi-core architecture, instruction-level and hyper-threadingenhancements, new reliability features and more.

Future Intel Itanium processors in development today are beingdesigned for socket and binary compatibility with Intel Itanium 9300processor-based systems and software. They are designed to scale inperformance and capacity through component upgrades, without softwarerecompilation, so customers can continue to expand and adapt theirmission-critical computing systems.

Common platform ingredients with Intel Xeon® processors spur innovation, add value


The Itanium® 9300 processor series and the future Intel® Xeon®processor, codenamed "Nehalem EX," share several platform ingredients,including the Intel® QuickPath Interconnect, the Intel Scalable MemoryInterconnect, the Intel® 7500 Scalable Memory Buffer (to take advantageof industry standard DDR3 memory), and I/O hub (Intel® 7500 chipset).The common elements foster shared innovation, design synergy, andmanufacturing efficiency across Intel® Xeon® and Itanium processorfamilies, and flexibility for customers.

Intelligent Energy Efficiency


An enhanced form of Demand-Based Switching (DBS) lowers power consumption when utilization is low. Intel® Turbo Boost Technologyautomatically senses and adapts to provide the right performance boostwhen needed, and to conserve power when it is not.The Intel Itanium processor 9300 series ranges in price from $946 to$3,838 in quantities of 1,000. OEM systems are expected to ship within90 days.

Intel,the world's largest chip maker, is also a leading manufacturer ofcomputer, networking and communications products. Additionalinformation about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom.


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rapid1 replied on Mon, Feb 8 2010 3:43 PM

LOL we should just get together 1000 people to buy one. Then we could all have an Itanium in our home desktop. If we did that it would not be but a couple of dollars over the i7 extreme rofl.

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And perform far worse.

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Inspector replied on Tue, Feb 16 2010 1:10 AM

rapid1:

LOL we should just get together 1000 people to buy one. Then we could all have an Itanium in our home desktop. If we did that it would not be but a couple of dollars over the i7 extreme rofl.

LOL i thought these are suppose to be more expansive not cheaper... if its 3k for 1k chips its only $3 a chip O.o (unless its 3k a chip)

Rapid im so in for this, i'll take a few too... :D if it was that cheap...

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rapid1 replied on Tue, Feb 16 2010 2:14 AM

rofl I wonder how an Itanium would run performance wise versus a I7 extreme though? I bet they would probably be somewhat close to each other, with the Itanium winning in the end, but who knows.

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