Microsoft To Remove i4i-Owned Feature From Word 2007

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News Posted: Tue, Dec 22 2009 6:05 PM
We definitely had to take a second look at our calendar, but it's notApril 1st. In fact, it's nowhere near it. Microsoft--the giant that youwould think could never be taken down--has just has its holiday thrownfor a loop. Or, at least Microsoft's team of lawyers. If you'llremember back, Microsoft had heard from a judge that its immenselypopular Word program could no longer be sold due to the softwareinfringing on patents of one i4i. Of course, Microsoft appealed and didits best to delay things, but it looks as if today's verdict could meanbusiness.

i4i had a patent on some XML inner-workings, which Word evidently usesfreely. Naturally, i4i isn't too pleased with this. Imagine all of thecopies of Word sold, and how much loot would come from having a smallroyalty attached to each one. It doesn't take a rocket scientist tounderstand why i4i is fighting so hard to get what it is apparentlydue. Just before Christmas, Microsoft has now lost its appeal, as the$290 million jury verdict was upheld for the infringing of patents. Thecourt also confirmed an injunction that would prevent the world'slargest software maker from selling a few versions of Word whichcontain the i4i code, though this would only start on January 11, 2010.



It should be noted that older versions of the software are not affectedor included in this, and as you may expect, the team in Redmond isactively working to remove the i4i feature(s) from Word 2007 and Office2007 packages. Meanwhile, the company is also considering anotherappeal, which could "include a request for a rehearing by a full panelof judges at the appeals court, or a request for a review by the U.S.Supreme Court." In case you're wondering, Word 2010 and Office 2010don't feature this software, and while Microsoft calls it a"little-used feature," even something "little" can obviously cost youquite a lot.

Goliath, meet David.
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digitaldd replied on Wed, Dec 23 2009 9:35 AM
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3vi1 replied on Wed, Dec 23 2009 9:55 AM

See what great innovation we've gotten as a result of software patents?

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

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3vi1 replied on Wed, Dec 23 2009 10:31 AM

I would be shocked if any Office Home users were using custom xml for data interchange, or even knew what it was.

This is a feature that 99.9% of the population won't miss.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

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digitaldd replied on Mon, Dec 28 2009 2:30 PM

3vi1:

See what great innovation we've gotten as a result of software patents?

 

The amazing thing about this whole thing is the feature that won i4i this big court decision is being removed completely from Office 2007 sometime in January. Apparently its an advanced feature few folks ever use. Sort of like how folks buy Word and only need maybe 10% of the features.

 

more here.

 

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