Intel Says Parents More Comfortable Talking Drugs Than Science

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News Posted: Wed, Oct 21 2009 4:09 PM

Intel's Third Quarter Results Break Records, Smash ExpectationsParents More Comfortable Talking Drugs than Science

Intel Survey Reveals Majority of Parents of Teens Find it Difficult to Help their Kids with Math and Science

  • The News: A recent Intel Corporation survey found that parents feel more equipped to talk about drug abuse than math and science with their children.
     
  • The Context: Despite a perceived importance of math and science for success, and an overwhelming willingness to be involved, the survey results reveal that parents, particularly those of teenagers, often find themselves with little more understanding of these subjects than their children and without the necessary resources to bridge this gap.
     
  • Why It Matters: A strong background in math and science is increasingly critical for American prosperity, security, health, environment and quality of life. And yet, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress report released last week, less than 40 percent of fourth- and eighth-graders are proficient in math. Intel believes that to better engage America's future innovators, we need to understand and appreciate the role that parents play in education and help them inspire their children to take an interest in math and science.

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Oct. 21, 2009 – When it comes to talking with their kids, parents say the topics of math and science are harder to discuss than drug abuse, according to a survey released by Intel Corporation today.

The survey found that although more than 50 percent of parents rank math or science as the subjects most critical to their children's future success, they report discomfort talking to their children about these subjects. In fact, nearly a quarter of parents who admit to being less involved in their child's math and science education than they would like say that a key barrier is their own lack of understanding of these subjects.

Last week, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), commonly called the "nation's report card," revealed that fewer than 40 percent of fourth- and eighth-graders in the United States are proficient in math. The NAEP report also found that fourth-graders have not improved since the last test was given in 2007, even though fourth-graders had improved on every NAEP math test since 1990.

"The link between math and science education and American innovation and competitiveness is more apparent than ever," said Shelly Esque, vice president of Intel's Corporate Affairs Group. "Our survey points to a difficult reality for our nation's parents: While they may recognize the importance of math and science, they are unable to engage with their children around these subjects due to limited understanding of the topics and scarcity of resources to help. We need to help parents help their kids make the best choices, including taking math and science courses so they are prepared to succeed."

Key Survey Findings
The survey also found that American schools are falling far short of parents' expectations, with nearly 9 in 10 parents saying they believe the U.S. lags behind other countries in math and science, even though 98 percent of parents say these subjects are critical to America's future.

Parents clearly want to be part of the solution. Ninety-one (91) percent of parents believe parental involvement is crucial to their children's academic success, with nearly 9 in 10 (89 percent) saying that talking to their children about the importance of math and science in the real world would help improve their children's performance and interest. Among the findings:

  • Despite recognizing the importance of math and science, parents say they are uncomfortable addressing these subjects with their children. More than 50 percent (53 percent) of parents of teenagers admit that they have trouble helping their children with math and science homework. Parents of high school students are also more likely than parents of younger kids to express disappointment in their own ability to help their child with these subjects.
     
  • Nearly a quarter of parents (23 percent) who admit to being less involved in their child's math and science education than they would like say their own lack of knowledge in these subjects is a key barrier.
     
  • Another 26 percent of parents who are less involved than they would like wish there was a one-stop shop with materials to refresh their existing, but unused math and science knowledge so they can better help their kids.

Intel believes that young people are the key to solving global challenges, and a solid math and science foundation coupled with skills such as critical thinking, collaboration and digital literacy are crucial for their success. Over the past decade alone, the company has invested more than $1 billion, and its employees have donated more than 2.5 million hours toward improving education in 50 countries. The results of this survey help Intel, and others, better understand the role parents play in inspiring today's youth to take an interest in math and science. To learn more about the Intel Education Initiative, visit www.intel.com/education. To join Intel's community of people sharing their stories with the hope of becoming a catalyst for action and a voice for change in global education, visit www.inspiredbyeducation.com.

This survey of parents in the United States was conducted online between Sept. 23 and 28, 2009 by Penn, Schoen and Berland Associates on behalf of Intel. Participants included 561 adults with children ages 5 to 18. The margin of error is +/- 4.14 percent.

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I wonder how much Intel paid for the survey.

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3vi1 replied on Wed, Oct 21 2009 8:27 PM

I've got no problem with them paying for a study that promotes education in the sciences... as long as they don't follow it up by telling kids that using non-x86 machine opcodes will make you pregnant.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

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SuperRob replied on Wed, Oct 21 2009 8:57 PM

I wouldn't blame them. I am in a math 40 college class. This is a page of notes that I created to help me study. This is only a sample of what I have to deal with. Of course there is more to it, but I only put the stuff that might be a little hard to remember. To those who don't know what this is, it's all about factoring and quadratic equations...

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Don't do drugs, Robert, and thanks for posting that for me!

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Super Dave:

Don't do drugs, Robert, and thanks for posting that for me!

Thought you were talking to me for a sec. Stick out tongue

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Super Dave replied on Wed, Oct 21 2009 10:51 PM

I agree very much with Intel when it mentions why it matters:

News:
Why It Matters: A strong background in math and science is increasingly critical for American prosperity, security, health, environment and quality of life.

Does Intel feel the same way when they decide where to build a FAB facility, and does Intel feel the same when they hire the brainpower to design their next generation of processors? If my son Robert becomes a great math genius and Intel has to decide whether to employ Robert or some guy in India who can do the job for 1/10th the cost, who is Intel likely to hire?

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3vi1 replied on Thu, Oct 22 2009 7:50 AM

Sad but true: The only tech money being made in America is through the recession-proof business of patent lawsuits.

Form a company, buy some nearly expired patents, then sue everyone over products that have been on the market for over a decade. Use some of the awarded monies to buy even more overly broad patents and keep building on your pyramid scheme, without ever actually creating anything It's a great service to mankind.

Also, always form the litigation entity in Texas, because apparently the only people we let on a jury have no idea what patents were supposed to do, how the internet or computers actually work, and will always side with the "local" boys.

http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS163466+09-Oct-2009+BW20091009

(/end of rant about the sad state of America that totally kills my incentive to bring any new tech product to market)

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

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gibbersome replied on Thu, Oct 22 2009 12:19 PM

Haha bob_on_the_cob, your avatar is a cartoon character who I'm pretty sure is on meth.

Think about it, he's hyperactive, has bouts of extreme happiness followed by brief moments of paranoia or sadness. And he's a taking sponge...

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gibbersome replied on Thu, Oct 22 2009 12:33 PM

>>>Does Intel feel the same way when they decide where to build a FAB facility, and does Intel feel the same when they hire the brainpower to design their next generation of processors? If my son Robert becomes a great math genius and Intel has to decide whether to employ Robert or some guy in India who can do the job for 1/10th the cost, who is Intel likely to hire?<<<

But is there anything wrong with that? If there is a kid in China/India/Mexico/Sweden who is just as brilliant as your son and willing to do the job for much less, then why not? It would make financial sense, right? Intel isn't an American company, it's a multi-national corporation.

We live in a much more globalized world, where the talent pool for human resources has suddenly gotten much, much bigger. Why not make the best use for it?

For America, this means we can't just rely on attracting the best intellectuals from around the world, many are staying put in their home country. We have to educate our youth and make math and science relevant again.

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gibbersome replied on Thu, Oct 22 2009 12:38 PM

3vi1:

keep building on your pyramid scheme, without ever actually creating anything It's a great service to mankind.

Wow, with that logic you might as well eliminate 90% of our financial and banking sector...

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gibbersome:
If there is a kid in China/India/Mexico/Sweden who is just as brilliant as your son and willing to do the job for much less, then why not? It would make financial sense, right? Intel isn't an American company, it's a multi-national corporation.

That was my point! It seems strange to me to see Intel waving the flag and preaching about what's critical for American prosperity, security, health, environment and quality of life.

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Sorry, I misread it.

But you're absolutely right, in greed, companies are multi-national, while in moments of crisis they are local.

GM, Chrysler + every major bank you can name have gone begging to their governments for relief in the last year.

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