Verizon Chief Declares Landlines Dead (And He's Probably Right)

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News Posted: Sat, Sep 19 2009 9:55 AM
Landline phones are dead. Done. Over with. Old hat. So last year. Ineffect, that's exactly how Verizon Communications chief Ivan Seidenbergfeels, and you know when Verizon's head honcho says landlines are done,they're done. But really, everyone knew this day was coming. Peoplehave been shutting off their landlines and going mobile-only for yearsnow. With mobile minutes easier to come by, Skype becoming pervasiveand Google Voice taking things even further into the digital realm,there's hardly a need for standard landlines anymore.

Mr. Seidenberg, while speaking at a Goldman Sachs investor conference,noted that Verizon simply wasn't concerned any longer with phonesconnected to wires. Granted, Verizon is pushing the voice aspect of itsFiOS service rather hard, but that relies on fiber and the samedecentralized environment that the Internet enjoys. Seidenberg notedthat "video is going to be the core product in the fixed linebusiness," asserting that these video/landline bundles will shortlymorph into video/cellphone bundles.


Verizon CEO - Ivan Seidenberg - Times they are a-changin'...

To be honest, there are still tons of landline numbers connected inAmerica and around the world. They won't vanish overnight, and theywon't all be disconnected at a moment's notice. But there's no denyingthat the momentum is gone, and people are definitely switching tomobile devices and Internet-based calling services. Have you made theswitch? If so, how long ago did you kiss your landline goodbye?


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When I first moved to VA about 2 years ago we didn't have a landline up until we bought our house in Jan. We had 4 cell phones between me and my wife. I insisted that we got a landline cause of having babysitters over and if there was a emergency or they needed to contact us. Not to mention my cell phone was constantly ringing with messages from the school and telemarketers.Landlines still have their needs. Not to mention they will never go away in the workplace.
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I was just about to offer my agreement about the total death of landlines, but Nelson is right that they will have a place in business forever.  But as far as home use goes, the newer generations are indeed shifitng to cell phones only and land lines in houses will be a small minority in the futre.

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Super Dave replied on Sun, Sep 20 2009 11:58 PM

News:
Landline phones are dead. Done. Over with. Old hat.

I can't agree more. I have AT&T landline in my area, and when the price for the Caller ID feature went from $3.75 to $9.99 mo, I got one of THESE. I am now saving $60+ a month. Landlines will have a place again only if they decide to compete with cable (Vonage etc.) and wireless.

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starwhite replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 12:26 AM

It had to happen sooner or later.

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Drago replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 1:42 AM

If land lines are dead, then why cant verizon get off their butts and offer something besides POTS lines and dialup in rural areas????? oh wait fiber is expensive and the demand in rural areas is low, and those morons can just deal with the same old crap they are used to. I would love to just have dsl, cause ALL cell service does NOT work where i live, yet the 50+ year old phone lines are still making verizon rich. $24.99 a month for the basic land line and another $9.95 for dialup internet. It is a real shame that sunce verizon owns the lines i cannot get dsl from any providor. Where is this broadband initiative Obama has been yapping about...oh thats right its all talk.

Verizon and their flaming pile of you know what can just kiss my hairy white tuckus.

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shawn.o replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 2:02 AM

Ha, say what you really mean!

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ClemSnide replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 3:56 AM

Yeah, I remember back when some minor celebrity, whose autobiography had tanked, declared that print was dead.

Landlines seem like an obsolete idea, until you have to spend 90 minutes on hold to customer service at, oh, I don't know, Verizon? Where they have so few human beings with a brain in their heads running support that it takes all morning screaming at a voice-recognition system (shades of Doonesbury's critique of the Newton), to get any result?

Verizon, and the other telephone providers, will have to do considerable work in changing pricing and reliability before they declare hard-wired telephone dead. I know they have those commercials declaring "no dead zones," but they have evidently not been to my house. Too bad; I would have served them cookies.


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realneil replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 9:32 AM

Rural America is vastly under-served as far as internet connectivity and new technology goes. Land lines are all they have and will have for a long time to come. Years ago, Large Telcos took money from the government to expand Fiber Optic lines throughout the United States, and never delivered except in a few, select locals. Nobody has made them deliver on the promise of fiber throughout America yet and that's a shame. They're asking for a whole lot more now to deliver what they've already been paid to do in the past and it looks like they're gonna get away with it. That's another shame, isn't it?

Corporate entities screwing the masses over for the almighty buck seems to be becoming a way of life in America. We also see this in the medical field, the retail sector, the food chain, in our government representatives actions, and yet we'll tell anybody that asks that we are firmly in control of our situation.

What a joke!

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nelsoncp21 replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 10:01 AM
Actually about 15 years ago they ran fiber optics like it was going out of style to accomodate govt and comercial expansion. A large portion of which today is still dark(not in use) Nobody predicted fiber to the home as there was no need or even a technology close enough to utilize. Fiber optics back then supported large backbones and that was it. Even today it is still not necassary to support current media being sent over it. It's only real advantage is it's distance to loss ratio over other copper cabling. Most of the fiber optics being installed today is to support newly developed or large growing area's. While it's not fair for those living rural area's, you do have to look at it from a business perspective as that's what it is. It doesn't make sense for any copany to spend several hundred thousand to support a couple dozen customers. I knew you were gonna chime in on this Drago. I understand your frustration my friend. I know my inlaws who live in a very rural part of VA had a similar problem. Lucky for them a guy down the road set up a sat link and provides LOS antenna broadband service to his neighbors for a monthly fee. Could be a possible business idea for ya. All though I am sure that is not cheap to set up.
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realneil replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 10:49 AM

Idea They were supposed to build it for everyone. Idea They were paid for it too with tax breaks and deregulation that brought much higher rates and more than double the profits for them. The fact that they were allowed to buy up all of the "little guys" and shut down competition didn't help either. Super Angry

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3vi1 replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 11:05 AM

Ivan Seidenberg: "Landlines are dead! Oh wait... my company only sells DSL in most areas? Oops."

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

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3vi1 replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 1:49 PM

>> Where is this broadband initiative Obama has been yapping about...oh thats right its all talk.

Actually, there's not a lot of money available to put into it, given the financial problems he inherited. The telco's are balking at the $6B in the stimulus plan as not being enough. Which, is probably correct (it would take $20B+, if other sources are to be believed).

Luckily, Bush already provided all Americans with broadband access "by 2007" as per the speech he made in March of 2004.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

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Drago replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 2:55 PM

Nelson, they have Texas Cell Net, but it is a line of site deal and well even though my neighbor has it and 4 of us around him want it, the rest of us cannot get it due to the fact that there are 120ft tall pine trees in a line in the property across the road that block the line of site to the 400ft tower their service is coming off of. Luckily our neighbor happens to be in a spot where there isnt a blockage, but the moronic company refuses to put in a damned repeater on his antena and let us shoot to his antenna to get service. They say we have to have a minimum of 5 before they consider that. So that idea is out of the water.

As for the land line being dead, it is so far from it. These bastards are raking in tons of money off of 50+ year old copper lines that all they have to do is half ass maintain.

What really gets me is that Verizon covers their *** by having an online form you can fill out to say you want dsl. The catch is everyone in your area has to go and fill that same form out in order for them to say ooo there is a need and want for dsl in that area so they can then justify the cost of bringing it out there. What is crap though is that i live between two towns with 300 population each. One has DSL through another provider, Embarq, yet since my phone lines come from the other town and Verizon owns them Embarq cannot use those lines to provide DSL service to verizon customers as verizon will not let anyone but them use their lines. At the very least that is anti competitive practices, but no one ever does anything about it and it really isnt worth the effort.

What is crap is these companies have all the money they need to expand, but they refuse to expand to keep their bottom dollar up and their stock up cause they are doing well in a recession. Well duh all they have to do is collect money off of the equipment that is already paid for and what they make is pure profit (land lines, cell towers, etc). It is the same BS with the toll roads, with enough people driving on them they are paid off within a few years, but will they ever not be toll roads? Never cause aside from a little maintenance the rest is pure profit. Corporate greed is why this nation is going to hell and everyone that doesnt speak up is just part of the problem.

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How far away from you does this neighbor live that can get the service. If they won't let Ýou put a repeater maybe you can work out a deal with your neighbor to use a Cat 5 line and extender and run a hardline. I have done it for people before
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iteched replied on Mon, Sep 21 2009 4:40 PM

ROI will keep new tech out of rural areas for a while - no news there. If companies actually have $ they will only invest it where ROI is favorable.

Apart from the occasional wireless provider and satellite don't look for HS internet in most rural areas anytime soon. There are still urban areas the companies can better invest - and they'll be first in line.

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rapid1 replied on Tue, Sep 22 2009 2:52 AM

Business I agree with. However I have not had a land line for 5 years. I had Vonage for most of it, a cell only before I got Vonage. Then me and Sarah decided to ditch that to, so we have our 2 cells now and that's it. With the deals offered now most of our most frequent numbers called or either same cell carrier, or we have them on the buddy list. I can however see throwing Vonage back in when our daughter gets old enough for baby sitters (other than Grandma or aunt Christie), of course she turns 3 on the 30th. For my location I really see no point in a land line. Heck Vonage offers all the conveniences of a land line with all the extras and long distance for 24.99 max.

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gibbersome replied on Wed, Sep 23 2009 12:51 AM

Alot of security systems are run off landlines. Of limited usefulness? Yes

Dead? Not yet.

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