Does Texting Ruin Your Ability To Communicate? WHU KNWZ, LOL!

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News Posted: Sun, Sep 6 2009 8:17 PM
We've seen report after report asserting that children, teens and even adults text like there's no tomorrow. According to Nielsen Mobile research, the average teenager with a cellphone sends and receives a grand total of 2272 text messages per month, or about eleventy billion per second of every day. All joking aside, there's no denying that the SMS revolution revolution is upon us. Certain schools are even educating children about the SMS lingo, but one has to wonder if all this textual communication isn't harmful to the innocent minds of our next generation.



A recent piece over at The Wall Street Journal attempts to tackle that very question, and unlike the pundits out there who are suggesting that the text message is single-handedly rotting the communication skills of their offspring, at least one parent feels that texting may actually have merit. WSJ contends that while texting may be incredibly annoying (ever had someone reply to a text while you're attempting to have a face-to-face talk?), the benefits outweigh the negatives if you're willing to not turn off formal communication entirely.



In fact, it could be argued that texting allows friends and family to stay somewhat in touch, whereas no contact at all would be made if talking over the phone or email were the only option. Also, it could be argued that texting complements the face-to-face talk, helping individuals to actually pick up more verbal cues over SMS than you could otherwise. The bottom line here is that no scientific data can prove one way or the other if texting is good or bad for you. We'd say that if you let texting take over your life, you're obviously asking for the criticism. If you simply use it to complement your daily communications, you'll be fine. Just make sure to step out every now and then and get some fresh air.
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Please tell me that no one has actually spelled out who as whu, or even puts a z in the place of an s. I really hope schools don't teach that so called "lingo."

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Kiristo replied on Wed, Sep 23 2009 10:07 AM

I feel out of place in the tech world. I am a huge computer geek. I built my own PC, complete with 12GBs of RAM, which probably says enough. I work in a tech job- network operations for the USAF, and love it. I've always been good with computers. Thus, everyone expects I am good with all tech devices. Obviously, I keep up with tech news, as I frequent this site, but I just got my first cellphone earlier this year (I'm 22, been on my own since 18) and have made probably a total of less than 20mins worth of calls (incoming and outgoing). I often don't even remember to bring it with me, and nor do I need to as I barely use it. It seems most tech people probably don't take 10 minutes to write a single sentence with a cellphone. Hell, my 62 year old father is far more antiquated with cellphones, he's on his almost all day. I've definately been missing this wave of technology, but I certainly don't envy everyone else. Especially when you are texting someone while talking to me face to face. That is pretty uncool.

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As someone without a cell phone texting plan I publically complain "Why would someone text me" every time I receive a text.  No texts, por favor.  As a University student I am in the minority, of course, but I'd prefer not to add more $ to the bill.  20 cents a text is criminal, btw.

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neilganon replied on Wed, Sep 23 2009 6:22 PM

I feel that texting is a quick and passive way to communicate with someone. It takes out the personal element of conversation so it is easy to do mindlessly. It has less of a chance of disturbing someone and it is a nice way to ease into communication with people you don't know well. It isn't time specific, so whatever you say could be read later or whenever it is convenient for the recipient. That said, I hate when relationships rely on text messaging. All relationships-- friends or lovers. I hate the feeling of trying to add real meaning to any text. And I hate it when people text more than they talk to people in person, even when they are around others. Also, random texts about random things are awesome.

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My good friend went through a horrible break up with a girl who never spoke on the phone. She preferred to text everyone she knew and she was proud of it. She said that she has one conversation longer than 5 mins during the past 3 months.

Now there's something very wrong about that.

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