At Last, the RealDVD Trial Begins

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News Posted: Sun, Apr 26 2009 5:32 PM
The trial in the case of RealNetworks' RealDVD product has finally begun. When it was first introduced we knew it was going to face legal challenges, and it only took about a month for a temporary restraining order to be put in place.

Real Networks has maintained that its RealDVD software is legal, and that it not only maintains the original DVD DRM, but adds another layer. The use of the software is for archival images of DVDs, they claim.

Real Networks is relying on the Kaleidescape decision, which stated that there is nothing in the DVD Copy Control Association (DVD CCA) licensing agreement that prohibits the development of products that allow users to copy their DVDs.



In fact, it's easy to find software (e.g. AnyDVD, DVDFab) that will not only make a copy, but remove DRM as well. Of course, those companies are based on parts of the world where the MPAA can't reach them.

The MPAA and DVD Copy Control Association (DVD-CCA) managed to score one win already on Friday: they managed to convince Judge Marilyn Patel, who also presided over the Napster trial, to seal the courtroom. The MPAA and DVD_CCA argued that confidential information might be disclosed during testimony about DVD-encryption technology.

Obviously, still more to come.
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3vi1 replied on Mon, Apr 27 2009 8:36 AM

I never liked Real Networks products (especially when they started bundling all the questionable ad-ware hijack every file association to stay afloat under Microsoft's assault to run them out of business), but I do hope they win this one.

The MPAA doesn't want there to be a product that you can use legally to format-shift your DVDs; they want to make sure they get more money per every movie you want to watch on every new type of device you buy. They got very spoiled when everyone bought VHS tapes and then re-bought their favorites on DVD.

The MPAA's lawyers need to realize that there's no putting this genie back in the bottle, and unless they want to sue all of their customers for fair-use applications they should give up.

In addition to the one's mentioned in the article, dvd::rip on Linux works great, and it's free and open source.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

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acarzt replied on Mon, Apr 27 2009 5:03 PM

I also dislike Real Networks... But I also really hope they win this. It should be perfectly legal for people to make a back up of their own DVDs so they can protect their investment.

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I have ripped all my CDs to my computer why shouldnt I be able to do it to DVDs. It is not like pirates have just not pirated DVDs because it is illegal they do it just the same. It only hurts the honest people, you know those guys that buy your stuff.

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MayCai replied on Fri, May 1 2009 11:04 PM

“In fact, it's easy to find software (e.g. AnyDVD, DVDFab) that will not only make a copy, but remove DRM as well. Of course, those companies are based on parts of the world where the MPAA can't reach them.

Yes, I use a software which can remove drm easy,named Wondershare Media Converter.

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