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Kingston Launches Low Latency Notebook Memory

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News Posted: Thu, Sep 4 2008 12:58 AM

Kingston Technology First to Launch High Performance Ultra Low-Latency DDR2 Notebook Memory


Innovative HyperX SO-DIMMs Infuse More Performance into Laptop Systems--Without Overclocking


Fountain Valley, CA -- September 3, 2008 -- Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the independent world leader in memory products, today announced it is first to release high performance, ultra low-latency 800MHz notebook memory. Shipping immediately in 4GB memory kits, the HyperX® PC2-6400 CL4 SO-DIMMs offer the additional benefit of Serial Presence Detect (SPD) capabilities to provide performance benefits to a wider array of notebooks.


 




"As more notebook systems standardize on faster 800MHz platforms, particularly the Intel Centrino 2 chipsets, Kingston engineers designed the high- performance, ultra low-latency HyperX SO-DIMMs to support them -- right out of the box,” said Mark Tekunoff, senior technology manager, Kingston®. "The new SO-DIMMs offer flexible upgrade options with their ability to enhance many existing systems -- boosting 800- and 667MHz platforms with the faster performing CL4/CL3 ultra low-latency SO-DIMMs.”



The new HyperX mobile memory is a perfect fit for notebook users who want to boost system performance by replacing standard notebook memory with high performance modules that boot to the highest speed possible -- without adjusting system BIOS settings.  Targeting new P45/Centrino 2 laptops the 800MHz CL4 modules have two pre-programmed ultra low-latency profiles: DDR2-800 CL4-4-4-12 @1.8V and DDR2-667 CL3-4-4-10 @1.8V.


Kingston HyperX ULL DDR2 SO-DIMM Specs
Part Number: KHX6400S2ULK2/4G 
4GB 800MHz Ultra Low-Latency DDR2 Kits (800MHz CL4-4-4-12 @ 1.8V and 667MHz CL3-4-4-10 @ 1.8V) SO-DIMMs
Kit of 2 $ 257.00 MSRP (U.S. only)


The release of the Kingston ultra low-latency 800MHz SO-DIMM kits continues a series of new notebook memory offerings to provide mobile users greater performance on existing systems. Kingston recently launched low-latency versions of its HyperX 800MHz DDR2 SO-DIMM notebook memory pre-programmed with three SPD profiles that allow the memory to work in 800MHz-CL5, 667MHZ-CL4 and 533MHz-CL3 low- latency configurations.




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I don't see the point in such RAM for laptops. Maybe gaming laptops. Am I wrong here?Indifferent

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warlord replied on Thu, Sep 4 2008 1:45 AM

I'm with ya bob most oem lappies won't benefit from this at all.

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mazuki replied on Thu, Sep 4 2008 6:29 AM

that depends on what you use them for guys, (or girls as well) think about running a live-dvd OS, or using it for virtualization, for most desktop people, this seems insane, but i know a few people who stick to laptops and use them for things most wouldn't even think about doing

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Dave_HH replied on Thu, Sep 4 2008 8:29 AM

There's a great reason for low latency RAM in notebooks especially. You can get a lot more memory bandwidth and performance out of lower latency settings that are programmed via the DIMM's SPD. This way you don't need to increase memory interface speed but with lower latency settings still get better performance.

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Drago replied on Thu, Sep 4 2008 10:58 AM

Im glad to see this. Where i work we have lots of lappys cause the managers like them but then after they have them a month they run like a dog cause of all the garbage the put on them. Most of our lappys are between a year and 3 years old, and we are trying to keep those things running well, and increasing the RAM in them helps alot, but Dell uses real cheapo RAM with crap timing. We have had hard drive failures to from the toshiba drives, and putting in some new WD scorpio ide drives at 5400rpm really speeds the computers up, and when we increase the RAM that helps as well. I try to get the lowest latency stuff as possible since on a lappy it does produce a better effect, but lots of times the dell bios's default them back to the crap timings that came with the system. A little tweaking/bios updates usually works.

Sure the lower latency may not do much more than a few extra percent in performance, but sometimes that is the difference of getting emails and phone calls from someone complaining that their computer is sluggish, or getting none till they dump their coffee in it lol.

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rapid1 replied on Thu, Sep 4 2008 11:59 AM

Yeah and then you ask "Doesn't the market seem to be swaying to the ddr3 side now" I mean 800 mhz Sodimm's are going to be a year long trend at best from what I see. Then everyone is going to be ddr3 (seems' to be moving way faster than desktopp ddr3 on market adherence). Of course the advantages on a laptop are much more than with a desktop. Whereas on a laptop the energy efficiency on 800 mhz ddr2 sodimm is basically the same as 667 sodimm's, on ddr3 sodimm's it is significantly more pronounced. I personally am thinking about grabbing that Gateway/Bestbuy 17" with the 9800 GTS. You can't beat it for the price! However either way memory processor and cpu FSB has been a major factor in my decision on a laptop. Throw in a 9800 GTS a 7200 rpm HD and ddr3 and wireless N at a 1920 native rez for under 1300 bucks how can it be beat. Back to the ram Kingston seems to be a little late in this game to me.

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Drago replied on Thu, Sep 4 2008 4:21 PM

You guys are forgetting the fact that not everyone is on the bleeding edge of technology. Hell look at my sig, im still using that as my main rig, cause it does everything i want it to do. Where i work the average computer we have is a P4 2.8ghz with 512mb of RAM with a sata 150 80gig hard drive. Our laptops are Pentium M's at 1.6ghz with var speed 4200-5400rpm drives with 512mb of RAM. It costs companies alot of money to upgrade and managment doesnt want to do that unless they see a profitable need. And guess what when we do upgrade, we dont always go to the latest and greatest stuff, but things that have been out for a while and are proven to be stable. Businesses run things longer than you might think, so i would seriously expect the ddr2 standard to still be selling for 4 years to come. Heck we still have computers on site that run pc100.

Kingston isnt really late in the game, but has waited for the process technology to mature so that when they get in they can learn from the mishaps and mistakes that other companies have made. Kingston knows what they are doing, IT folk will definitely be grabbing these things up just so they can forgo getting new equipment since there is about to be a big transition come 2009 with AMD and Intel.

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I've just upgraded laptop memory from latency 5-5-5-15 to Hyperx with latency 4-4-4-12 and there are no noticeable differences. Exactly the same boot-up and shutdown times. My original memory was 3gb and the HyperX memory was 2gb. Would this make a difference with Vista, even though only 50% memory capacity is used with 2gb?

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Burt Wilson:

I've just upgraded laptop memory from latency 5-5-5-15 to Hyperx with latency 4-4-4-12 and there are no noticeable differences. Exactly the same boot-up and shutdown times. My original memory was 3gb and the HyperX memory was 2gb. Would this make a difference with Vista, even though only 50% memory capacity is used with 2gb?

You will not see a speed bump in start up and shut down from memory because they are both harddrive bound.

 

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Would moving from CL5 to CL4 or from CL4 to CL3 really be that significant?

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Burt Wilson:

Would moving from CL5 to CL4 or from CL4 to CL3 really be that significant?

most of the time not, but it depends on what you do with your laptop.

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