IBM Introduces Industry's Fastest 1TB Tape Drive

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News Posted: Thu, Jul 17 2008 8:21 AM

IBM Introduces the Industry's Fastest One Terabyte Storage Tape Drive

New IBM System Storage TS1130 Tape Drive Delivers New Capacity and Performance for Clients


ARMONK,NY -  IBM today introduced the industry’s fastest one terabyte (TB) storage tape drive, which will enable clients to protect and archive more information with less cost and less energy usage - the highest capacity and performance of any tape drive in the market.

The new IBM System Storage TS1130 Tape Drive will be able to store up to one TB of uncompressed data per tape cartridge and with a native data rate of 160 megabytes per second (MB/s), storage backups can be completed up to 54 percent faster than the previous generation drive.

Equivalent to storing the text of one million books on a single tape cartridge, the IBM System Storage TS1130 Tape Drive is ideal for mid-sized to enterprise clients across financial, life sciences and public sector industries looking for massive data protection, compliance and archive solutions needed over the long term. Coupled with IBM’s tape virtualization offerings, large, scalable automation, and tape drive encryption, customers can benefit from the low cost of tape solutions that are highly secure, while simplifying the management of backup and archive operations.

"IBM is committed to tape storage as part of a tiered information infrastructure and today we offer the fastest, highest capacity drive in the market,” said Cindy Grossman, Vice President of Tape and Archive, IBM System Storage. “Tape storage is the most green and cost-effective form of data storage available, and the IBM TS1130 Tape Drive will enable clients to address their growing needs for affordable and robust data solutions by storing more data on fewer cartridges, which will save clients valuable time, space, energy and money."

The IBM System Storage TS1130 uses a high technology Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) head design that leverages IBM's world-record achievement of developing a more sensitive read-write head for the magnetic tape system --- which results in fewer data read errors helping to provide outstanding data integrity and subsystem reliability. It also features a special head overcoat technology that helps increase the overall life expectancy of the product.

The TS1130 uses existing 3592 rewritable and WORM cartridges. It offers backwards compatibility with support for Gen 1, 2 and 3 formats supporting both read and write for Gen 2 and read only for Gen1 helping to protect media investments and lower costs.

The TS1130 Tape Drive also supports drive-based data encryption to help protect your data. The TS1130-based encryption and associated Encryption Key Manager component are supported in a wide variety of operating system environments.

IBM is number one in the world for branded total tape revenue share five years running and number one in branded enterprise drives and automation revenue (1). The IBM System Storage TS1130 Tape Drive is an important part of the information infrastructure strategy - delivering the availability, security, retention and compliance requirements that clients seek. This strategy maps directly to IBM’s New Enterprise Data Center model, which helps clients improve IT efficiency and facilitates the rapid deployment of new IT services for future business growth.

Pricing and Availability:
The new IBM System Storage TS1130 (GA) will be available worldwide on September 5, 2008 with a starting price of $39,050. IBM is also offering an upgrade from existing drives for $19,500 and backward media compatibility for investment protection.

The IBM System Storage TS1130 is available either direct from IBM or through IBM Business Partners.





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ice_73 replied on Thu, Jul 17 2008 4:47 PM

i dont quite understand. from my memory of cassetes (i know its audio but its the same principal) is that casettes were alot easier to damage due to sun, moisture, etc.... so i dont understand how this can be the safest and most cost effective way to keep information? a raptor hard drive, or any hard drive for that matter will last years upon years especially if not being used, and is alot cheaper, and now the data transfer rates can reach around 160mb/s too on hard drives.

am i missing something? it just seems so useless.....

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SqUiD267 replied on Thu, Jul 17 2008 5:51 PM

What the hell is a tape drive?

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ice_73 replied on Thu, Jul 17 2008 6:23 PM

SqUiD267:

What the hell is a tape drive?

it looks simliar to a vhs, its what they used to record info before floppy disks.

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mfe5003 replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 7:20 AM
I thought tapes died out pre-2000

maybe they last longer than cds in a controlled environment because they are enclosed and wont get scratched
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rapid1 replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 8:14 AM
rofl audio tapes are made on plastic with magneto adherent film these are tapes made of a more metallic material the genre is generally also fully enclosed unlike audio tapes plus it holds 1 terabyte whereas a cd holds 7-900MB DVD's hold much more but nowhere near a TB even dual or triple layer even a raptor hd only holds 150GB and a teraraptor 300GB but it costs a lot more than a tape expecially within imaging apps such as microfiche etc this is quite possibly the best way think libraries schools scientific research facilities banks legal entities (lawyers and courts)etc. Anyone that needs a truly monstrous backup system.
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rodriro replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 10:03 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive
He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man... Hunter S. Thomson Aka Dr. Johnson
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rodriro replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 10:05 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive
He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man... Hunter S. Thomson Aka Dr. Johnson
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rodriro replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 10:05 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive
He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man... Hunter S. Thomson Aka Dr. Johnson
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rodriro replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 10:06 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive
He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man... Hunter S. Thomson Aka Dr. Johnson
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rodriro replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 10:10 AM

Your missing the point here, it's not about how fast, how thick, or what it is made of. It's about unit cost and stability, its the combustion engine of drives. Just thank it  when you lose your tax, audit, personal finance information from 1-10 years ago especially when a financial institution, employer, or client asks for the informaiton.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive

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3vi1 replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 11:12 AM
Knowing IBMs past pricing: I'll bet the tapes cost a couple of hundred dollars each. I can't see how anyone but the largest of institutions would ever use this enough for it to be cost-effective.

Hard drives are getting cheaper every day. If you don't make your money back on this thing in the next five or six years, you'll be paying more than the cost of similar sized hard-drives, *and* you'll be stuck with an expensive support contract to keep this thing running in the event you ever need to restore the data.

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ice_73 replied on Fri, Jul 18 2008 11:50 AM

rapid1:
rofl audio tapes are made on plastic with magneto adherent film these are tapes made of a more metallic material the genre is generally also fully enclosed unlike audio tapes plus it holds 1 terabyte whereas a cd holds 7-900MB DVD's hold much more but nowhere near a TB even dual or triple layer even a raptor hd only holds 150GB and a teraraptor 300GB but it costs a lot more than a tape expecially within imaging apps such as microfiche etc this is quite possibly the best way think libraries schools scientific research facilities banks legal entities (lawyers and courts)etc. Anyone that needs a truly monstrous backup system.


there are plenty of 1tb hard drives now, i still see no advantage.

a hard drive has random acccess, a tape has sequential access. a hard drive costs a few hundred, this tape costs a few thousand. seriously what is the advatnage?

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digitaldd replied on Tue, Jul 22 2008 5:50 AM

interesting, we still use tape for enterprise backups, arclogs and such. problem with backing up to hard drives in an enterprise is you need to send stuff offsite for protection in case of fire or natural disaster. sending 100 1TB hard drive to an off site storage facility is a pain because of the weight. The 1TB [or 400Gig] tapes for the matter are much lighter and easier to move. also a box with 20 tapes can be carried around by clutzes who make $8-10 an hr drop a box with 20 hard drives and one is bound to fail. yes you can use a NAS/SAN for backup you can divide the storage into tape sized partitions for easy restoration, you can even make the network storage partitions look like tapes to your backup software but you can't move a whole SAN/NAS offsite [at least with the amounts of data you deal with in an enterprise enviroment]. you can try backing up the SAN/NAs accross the WAN but that would be SLOW even on a fiber WAN with DS3's OS192's or whatever high bandwidth and ludicrously priced setup you have.

 

 

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