Asetek LCLC - Low Cost Liquid Cooling System

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News Posted: Thu, Apr 10 2008 10:14 AM

Just in case you missed the new link at the top of the home page, we're here to let you know that we have just posted a new article in which we evaluate the features and performance of the Asetek LCLC, Low Cost Liquid Cooling system.  The LCLC may resemble other water cooling setups but it provides many features that set it apart from the pack.  Asetek has attempted to address nearly all of the traditional disadvantages of water cooling compared to air cooling.  First off, the LCLC is a completely sealed system, which means it comes completely pre-assembled.  This eliminates issues of assembly error and makes installation simpler.  A non-toxic, non-flammable liquid and plastic tubing is used to eliminate evaporation issues, which means the system will not require refilling, reducing maintenance.  This also makes a reservoir unnecessary, which makes the system simpler.  To further simplify the LCL, the pump and cold plate (a.k.a. water block) have been integrated together into a single unit.  Overall, the LCLC proved to be a solid product.  Click the link below and check it out...

Asetek LCLC - Low Cost Liquid Cooling System



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It looks like a fairly useful and easy setup... However, i'm not too impressed with the benchmarks (in the review)... I would have thought CPU temps under load would have been significantly lower with this system. It still seems like a good and functional water kit.

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AjayD replied on Thu, Apr 10 2008 6:33 PM

I too was hoping to see lower CPU temperatures under load. I wonder how much of a difference the dual fan model with the larger radiator would make? It might be more effective if you were only using it to cool the CPU and it didn't have the additional heat from the GPU. I love the fact that it is a sealed system, and it would appear to be well priced.

Will the CPU block be compatible with the new Nehalem socket motherboards if they offer a new mounting ring for them?

 

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trueg50 replied on Fri, Apr 11 2008 5:57 PM

I am not surprised at all.

 

Watercooling + push pins = very poor results.

 

Add a single 120mm rad for CPU and GPU is nothing but fail. 

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higgamo replied on Sun, Apr 13 2008 11:36 AM

trueg50:

I am not surprised at all.

 

Watercooling + push pins = very poor results.

 

Add a single 120mm rad for CPU and GPU is nothing but fail. 

yea gonna have to argee with that. this seem like it gonna be a major problem with sli. it might match the stock cooling for the gpu in sli lol.

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mr.gallo18 replied on Sun, Apr 13 2008 11:39 PM

where you can buy this product ( asetek lclc- low cost liquid cooling system

 

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MikeL_HH replied on Mon, Apr 14 2008 8:40 AM
higgamo:

trueg50:

I am not surprised at all.

 

Watercooling + push pins = very poor results.

 

Add a single 120mm rad for CPU and GPU is nothing but fail. 

yea gonna have to argee with that. this seem like it gonna be a major problem with sli. it might match the stock cooling for the gpu in sli lol.

I agree with that sentiment. A 120mm rad isn't nearly enough for both a high-end CPU and GPU. But the LCLC does come with other rads, including dual-120mm if you're so inclined. The version used in the Blackbird has the dual-120mm rad. From what I can surmise from the original marketing material, the LCLC was originally designed with mATX applications in mind so all-out performance wasn't really what they were trying to do.

Besides, which self-respecting water cooling enthusiast would even consider a kit? Most people probably aren't too concerned with all-out performance at the sacrifice of everything else.

mr.gallo18:

where you can buy this product ( asetek lclc- low cost liquid cooling system

 

A bunch of online stores have it, although a lot of the really big ones don't. I do know that NCIX current has it on both their US and Canadian website. I've shopped at their Canadian site a lot and can vouch that it's a pretty good store. I think Newegg had it at some point but it doesn't seem to be in there system anymore.

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higgamo replied on Mon, Apr 14 2008 8:54 AM

LovelyCrap:


Besides, which self-respecting water cooling enthusiast would even consider a kit? Most people probably aren't too concerned with all-out performance at the sacrifice of everything else.

well 99% ill agreed with that but i was planing on sff mod build and was hoping to see it would do alittle better then it did. Wanted to use a kit so to lower the chance of damage from movement and less maintance. =)

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MikeL_HH replied on Mon, Apr 14 2008 10:32 AM
higgamo:

LovelyCrap:


Besides, which self-respecting water cooling enthusiast would even consider a kit? Most people probably aren't too concerned with all-out performance at the sacrifice of everything else.

well 99% ill agreed with that but i was planing on sff mod build and was hoping to see it would do alittle better then it did. Wanted to use a kit so to lower the chance of damage from movement and less maintance. =)

Isn't the LCLC still basically the one of the best solutions? Especially for under $100. With most SFF cases, you have serious vertical clearance issues and unless you mod the case you won't be able to fit in a 120mm wonder-tower heatsink like the Thermalright Ultra-120. Even if you did fit a mega-tower in there, you'd be cripped by the crappy air-flow most of the time (again, unless you mod). The Silverstone NT-06 we used for comparison in the review is actually really popular with the SFF crowd exactly because it happens to be low enough to fit into most SFF cases. On all Silverstone SFF cases, it is probably the best air cooler to use because they are all designed with the PSU positioned right over the CPU socket, so you can throw a NT-06 on your processor and it should meet up nicely with the PSU fan, which would do double-duty as the CPU fan. From what I've seen, it's actually a pretty effective way to do it, although it sort of stresses the PSU, since all that hot air from the CPU is going through it but it shouldn't be an issue if you get a high quality unit. So if you were using a Silverstone SUGO (v1, v2 or v3) or an X-QPack, the LCLC looks like a winner to me. "Desktop" style cases are a different story, but I don't really consider those SFF, since they are often about the size of the standard mid-tower, except on its side.

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higgamo replied on Mon, Apr 14 2008 11:11 AM

Dont get me wrong i think LCLC is a great solution. i was planing on moding a Swiftech H20-120 in to a sff case which has been proven possible with the case i had chosen. I seen people posting numbers for there H20-120 that are below LCLC, not sure if they install a better fan or not. i was just hoping that the lclc would do better then H20-120. Sorry if i upset you, wasnt saying the LCLC is a bad product. 

P.s. (not sure if the cpu temp with the LCLC was test with or without the gpu) 

 

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MikeL_HH replied on Mon, Apr 14 2008 12:28 PM
higgamo:

Dont get me wrong i think LCLC is a great solution. i was planing on moding a Swiftech H20-120 in to a sff case which has been proven possible with the case i had chosen. I seen people posting numbers for there H20-120 that are below LCLC, not sure if they install a better fan or not. i was just hoping that the lclc would do better then H20-120. Sorry if i upset you, wasnt saying the LCLC is a bad product. 

P.s. (not sure if the cpu temp with the LCLC was test with or without the gpu) 

 

Hey higgamo, what gave you the idea that I was upset? Just stating my opinion and responding to your comments. No harm, no foul.

CPU test was with GPU connected. Probably would have performed a bunch better if the GPU wasn't connected too. With only a single 120mm fan, you can't really expect killer performance for both CPU and a 8800 at the same time, but if you're going SFF, you don't really have a choice for a bigger heat exchanger. The H20-120 is CPU only, correct? If I remember correctly, the H20-120 looks pretty much the exact same as a CPU-only LCLC config. I think the LCLC still comes in cheaper, unless you can get the H20-120 on sale. But the H20-120 is definitely a lot easier to find in retail. I didn't test the CPU-only LCLC so I can't comment on the performance.

Edit: I changed my signature for you.

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higgamo replied on Mon, Apr 14 2008 12:34 PM

no biggy wasnt sure if it was if the LCLC was used cpu and gpu at use a the same time ( nice temp for the price). sorry lol just the reply catch me off guard. the price make me tempted to try it out for my self tho. xD

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As stated in the article, You would have more than likely seen better results from a fan that pushes more air. Certain "rads" are design for lower air flow and some air design for higher air flow. With out knowing the spacing of the fins on this rad it is hard to say which fan would suite this best. Most rads are designed for high airflow. Another point is the fact that the pump is built into the water block. Pumps produce heat themselves and therefor shouldn't be built intot he waterblock as it will effect temps. I would say "as is" this product would be ideal for the HTPC market. It offers a low noise, low cost effective cooling solution. I say effective because it does the job but not for a enthusiast system. This is def not designed for high overclocking or volt modding. But as stated already those who tend to do that don't buy kits anyway. So I give it a thumbsup for what it is. A low cost, compact, inexpensive adequate cooling solution. there's my .02

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rapid1 replied on Fri, May 23 2008 8:43 AM

the thing on here that confuses me is this OK it's totally sealed right but liquid especially when used in a radiator type systems is going to evaporate or potherwise break down and dissipate over time since it is sealed that will take longer of course but will never the less happen sooner or later so how do you know when your liquid has broken down to the point that it's dangerous for whatever you have it cooling and then  what can you do buy a new one to replace the sealed yet insufficient unit

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