Intel & Microsoft Fund Multi-Threading Research

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News Posted: Wed, Mar 19 2008 9:41 AM

Yesterday, news broke regarding Microsoft and Intel launching parallel research centers at UC Berkeley and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to investigate way to accelerate developments in mainstream parallel computing.  And today, we've posted some details and commentary on the subject over at HotHardware.  Here's a snip from the piece...


"Even today, writing software able to take advantage of multi-threading is notoriously difficult. In order to help drive the development of the tools and threading-aware applications, Microsoft and Intel are together awarding the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of California at Berkeley $10 million dollars over five years to fund two Universal Parallel Computing Research Centers (UPCRC)."

Intel & Microsoft Fund Multi-Threading Research




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frg1 replied on Wed, Mar 19 2008 10:03 AM

sounds intersting 

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replied on Wed, Mar 19 2008 1:25 PM

and this technology is headed where?Servers or workstations?

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trueg50 replied on Wed, Mar 19 2008 2:55 PM

 Yes!

 

This is excellant news, it means the multi-core beasts Intel is preparing will at the very least have some use in an Operating system, though Microsoft might pass on some of that knowledge to others via custom compilers / tools for developers.

 

I guess this also means that the tools that Intel created for making multithreaded apps didn't turn out so well.

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frg1 replied on Wed, Mar 19 2008 6:55 PM

sounds great 

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replied on Wed, Mar 19 2008 11:26 PM

if microsoft will support with its Windows well multicore,you still have to convince all the programmers that make a lot of useful programs that you use day by day to make their apps with multicore support and that is hard,trust me,and no one will do that,at least just for now

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frg1 replied on Wed, Mar 19 2008 11:36 PM

 maybe if they had a new proggraming language this would make it easier

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replied on Thu, Mar 20 2008 12:30 AM

Multicore programming is very hard,trust me

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frg1 replied on Thu, Mar 20 2008 4:52 AM

CoolZone:

Multicore programming is very hard,trust me

i know its hard im just saying make it easier with a new langauge or tools infact it will probably always be hard
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replied on Thu, Mar 20 2008 1:20 PM

It will be always be hard,and with the growth of threads,it gets harder and harder

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AjayD replied on Thu, Mar 20 2008 3:42 PM

I suspect we won't see much support for multi-core processing among simpler applications until they become complex enough to truly benefit from it. The largest advantage will come via improved multi-core task assignment and processing in windows. Even if the application itself isn't designed to take advantage of multiple cores, if you are multitasking, Windows will be better equipped to distribute tasks among the cores for maximum efficiency. Of course this will only apply to future processors that are designed for fully independent core functionality. Hopefully we will see the fruits of this research in Windows 7. It would be best if windows had the capability to automatically apply multiprocessing to all applications rather than requiring the individual applications to be programed as such.

I don't know very much about programming so please feel free to correct or enlighten me if I am wrong.

 

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frg1 replied on Thu, Mar 20 2008 3:47 PM

 dont see why windows  wouldnt incorparate that in windows 7

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trueg50 replied on Thu, Mar 20 2008 3:50 PM

While yes, Windows will use multiple processors very well, the issue is still, multi-processor use in single apps, such as Auto CADD, or games.

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replied on Fri, Mar 21 2008 7:55 AM

it does not really matter if windows supports multi-core,it matters only if the running application supports multi-threading or not.

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wolf2009 replied on Fri, Mar 21 2008 12:59 PM

CoolZone:

Multicore programming is very hard,trust me

 

thats dissapointing to know , guess we wont see multi core applications anytime soon. 

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replied on Fri, Mar 21 2008 3:32 PM

There are a lot of 2 core support(threads) in lots of apps,but that's it!No more.Only some selected apps have quad support,and those are very little in number

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