Judge: PGP Passphrase is Private

rated by 0 users
This post has 3 Replies | 0 Followers

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 25,826
Points 1,168,040
Joined: Sep 2007
ForumsAdministrator
News Posted: Sat, Dec 15 2007 4:28 PM

A judge has ruled that a defendent cannot be forced to give up the passphrase for his encrypted hard drive.  Without this passphrase, authorities aren't able to decrypt his drive.  Now we know why U.K. authorities were asking for a backdoor into Bitlocker-encrypted Windows Vista PCs last year, right?

U.S. Magistrate Judge Jerome Niedermeier ruled that a man charged with transporting child pornography on his laptop across the Canadian border has a Fifth Amendment right not to turn over the passphrase to prosecutors. The Fifth Amendment protects the right to avoid self-incrimination.

Niedermeier tossed out a grand jury's subpoena that directed Sebastien Boucher to provide "any passwords" used with his Alienware laptop. "Compelling Boucher to enter the password forces him to produce evidence that could be used to incriminate him," the judge wrote in an order dated November 29 that went unnoticed until this week. "Producing the password, as if it were a key to a locked container, forces Boucher to produce the contents of his laptop."

While we see the analogy here, it's also true that defendents can be forced to give up their DNA, or keys to lockers and other places.  Isn't this just a key?  Too many metaphors to keep straight?

On the other hand, music downloaders may be looking into PGP or Bitlocker even as we write this.

This is likely not the end of the story.




  • | Post Points: 35
Top 500 Contributor
Posts 150
Points 2,250
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: U.S.
mazuki replied on Sat, Dec 15 2007 5:33 PM
none of those are impossible to break, especially windows' bitlocker, if you want true security, create a truecrypt image, and create a standard and hiddent image, then give them the password to the hidden, and they'll see that there is nothing there, while the standard has your stuff
  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Posts 3,654
Points 29,000
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: United States, Texas
Drago replied on Sun, Dec 16 2007 3:42 AM
dont get caught with crap that gets you in trouble, so dont put it on your computer in the first place. I like my encryption strategy though, a sledge hammer. Try and piece back all of those busted platters in this mangled hard drive, or read this dented and busted cd/dvd, or try to figure out if this really was a flash drive not mangled and smashed plastic.

A+ Certified PC Repair Technician
Associates Degree in Computer Science
Bachelors Degree in Computer Information Systems

DFI Lanparty UT NF3 250GB Dead.......Replacement  Abit KV-85
Learn more about Comp TIA A+ Certification.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 50 Contributor
Posts 2,617
Points 32,625
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Minnesota, United States
ice91785 replied on Sun, Dec 16 2007 1:41 PM

Drago:
dont get caught with crap that gets you in trouble, so dont put it on your computer in the first place. I like my encryption strategy though, a sledge hammer. Try and piece back all of those busted platters in this mangled hard drive, or read this dented and busted cd/dvd, or try to figure out if this really was a flash drive not mangled and smashed plastic.
 

Haha! i like you Drago
 

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (4 items) | RSS