Bill Gates, Zuck, and Gabe Newell Say You Should Learn To Be A Coder

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News Posted: Tue, Feb 26 2013 3:38 PM
For many, the idea of becoming a coder sounds like a terribly difficult if not esoteric thing, a skill set as exclusive as brain surgery or rocket science. And while being good at coding will open virtually an unlimited number of doors, it’s not as unattainable as it may seem.

Code.org is a website designed to both spread the word that there are tens of thousands of vacant jobs for programmers out there and also provide an “authoritative database of all programming schools” available, both online and at physical locations. You can also begin to learn to code right there on the website.

If you’re unconvinced, check out this video of smart and talented people telling you that you coding is something you should learn to do.


Look, if Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and Gabe Newell all think you should consider coding as a lucrative and rewarding career path, you listen. (Not so much when Chris Bosh and will.i.am say it, but still.) There also appears to be a consensus that learning to code isn’t only valuable as a specific skill set, but also as a way to learn how to think and problem-solve, which are skills that are applicable to all areas of life and career.

Hadi Partovi, founder of Code.org, puts it succinctly in the video: “Whether you’re trying to make a lot of money, or whether you just want to change the world, computer programming is an incredibly empowering skill to learn.”

Code.org
Learning to code at Code.org

Bill Gates first learned to code when he was in middle school, because some wealthy donor insisted that the kids have a computer lab. This was at a time when computers were simply not very accessible, and here Gates was as an adolescent with access to essentially the best computers that money could buy. Gates’ own brilliance and dogged determination made him a success, but what if he didn’t have computers on which to learn coding? Consider for a moment where the world would be without Microsoft as a tech company and then subsequently without Gates as a billionaire philanthropist.

The Internet is the most liberating innovation in human history since the printing press, and Code.org is a powerful way for anyone with an Internet connection (or access to a connected library or school) to tap into the skills needed to be part of the ever-growing computer technology field.

Coders can change their own lives for the better while also solving the world’s problems or developing new innovations; it’s an exciting time to be alive.
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Coding and programming are two different things in my opinion :/

That said, we should not be teaching programming, instead, we should be teaching problem solving. Thats what it is for the most part, it is the essence, and most people I know, do not know how to break problems down and solve them, instead they get overwhelmed.

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Dave_HH replied on Tue, Feb 26 2013 9:43 PM

Agreed MM, though I think that is the point of Code.org -- getting people to think about not only coding but problem solving and outside of the box thinking.

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Dorkstar replied on Tue, Feb 26 2013 10:36 PM

Oddly enough I was in the middle of a "Business meeting" with 2 friends of mine, when one of them brought up the idea of developing a web application for something were working on.  Since I currently have the most experience (6 weeks of C++ programming in high school;don't judge me), and I've been interested in taking another stab at programming again I decided I'd try learning with the free time I have right now between job hunting. 

  I went to go take a mid rum & coke piss break and pulled up hot hardware on my phone and saw this article.  You guys might have just opened a new door for me.

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scolaner replied on Wed, Feb 27 2013 12:18 AM

Well shoot, Dorkstar, we do what we can! ;) Good luck--

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Dorkstar replied on Wed, Feb 27 2013 12:55 AM

Well I decided to take it easy on myself and work on HTML before progressing into things I really want to work on (i've been eyeballing Android, iOs mobile apps, and python since they seem to be the most in demand). Just finished the first lesson in HTML, took me about 30 minutes or so, and was definitely a good refresher to what I learned...uhhh 18 years ago? Think I was in 7th grade when I first learned HTML and recall it taking from about midnight until 5 in the morning to figure it out. I'm much more proficient now. I'll continue to update here as I progress. As of right now it's simply teaching me how to hyperlink images, create headers, titles, paragraphs, tell the page i'm using html, and how to create a body. Nothing that dreamweaver or blogger can't do in 30 seconds.

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Dorkstar replied on Wed, Feb 27 2013 1:40 AM

Just finished HTML Basics 2. Since it was mainly list and styles i'll use a list to explain the lessons learned.

-Font types, colors, background colors, and font styles (italics, bold)

-Font size

-Organized list

-Unorganized list

Again, nothing I feel dreamweaver or any simple website builder software couldn't do much faster than me typing

Crap now I'm wondering if should have typed " "

Either way, i'm 3 rum & cokes deep, already pestered marco on where my build video is (he claims to be working on it... I debated on threatening his life but decided otherwise), and need to wake up to go to my soon to be gone job in the morning. Hopefully this will be a project I'll pick up again tomorrow. Either way, I really think this website has shown me that I have the patience and desire to learn a programming language. It's been 10 years since the last time I typed a piece of code into anything.

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I wonder if Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg will sign my White House Petition to end age discrimination in the software industry so that we can put our experienced software developers with decades of experience back to work?

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/put-end-age-discrimination-software-industry/fjF2dPC8?utm_source=wh.gov&utm_medium=shorturl&utm_campaign=shorturl

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test

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Dorkstar replied on Wed, Feb 27 2013 7:15 PM

phew, put a in at least 3 hours into this today.  I finished up html basics I, II, III and decided to move into Java.  Variables and boolean functions have about fried my brain for now.  Got to take a break.  Can't decide if I should continue with Java (as I've really had no desire to learn it), or move back to CSS and finish up the HTML course.  With basic computer skills I'd say each module should take you about 30 minutes a piece, they typically consist of 5 classes per module that increase in difficult as you continue.  Either way, it's really been a fun thing to do to pass the time and educate myself in some new languages. 

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Dorkstar replied on Thu, Feb 28 2013 12:51 PM

Well, I backed off of Java when I realized I hadn't completed the entire HTML course.  Overall, I'm rather satisfied with the sites ability to build upon what you learned, occasionally make you think rather than telling you, and the ability to never feel trapped, as you always have the option of posting on the forums or reviewing previous lessons to help you figure it out.

If you're interested in seeing how far I've gotten or what I've learned, you can view my profile at : http://www.codecademy.com/users/ajaxpro30459

I've also been putting this link on my resumes so potential employers can see my progression in self development as well as my ability to learn new things.  It may never help me get a job, but at least you can show proof of additional education.

 

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every few years you need to start over and learn a new language

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