Nokia Brings Windows Phone To Lower-End Lumia 505 Smartphone

rated by 0 users
This post has 6 Replies | 2 Followers

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 24,856
Points 1,115,475
Joined: Sep 2007
ForumsAdministrator
News Posted: Sun, Dec 16 2012 1:25 AM
For a good while now, high-end Nokia smartphones have been planted in the Lumia line using Windows Phone, while lower-end Nokia phones were planted in the Asha line running an OS that hardly anyone in America could even pretend to care about. But now, it looks like Nokia's spreading its wings a bit. The company's newest Lumia just happens to be on the low-end side of the fence, bringing Windows Phone to an entirely new Nokia demographic. The Lumia 505 boasts a 3.7" (800x480) touch panel of the ClearBlack AMOLED variety, along with an 8MP rear camera, an 800MHz single-core CPU, 256MB of RAM and a 1300mAh battery.


There's also 4GB of internal storage as well as quad-band GSM support, but no pricing information has been leaked as of yet. It looks as if the phone will begin its life on foreign airwaves, perhaps first in Mexico, but a budget Windows Phone could be just what Microsoft needs to crack open another set of potential customers.
  • | Post Points: 65
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 1,016
Points 10,925
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Mcallen, Texas
OSunday replied on Sun, Dec 16 2012 3:51 AM

I understand the necessity of appealing to a wide variety of potential buyers budgets but I'm not a fan of toned downed products with reduced hardware specs unless its for a specific purpose other than to make a sale.

The Raspberry Pi's Model A is a great example of this.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 150 Contributor
Posts 756
Points 7,635
Joined: Nov 2012
Location: Dallas, Tx
Dorkstar replied on Sun, Dec 16 2012 1:55 PM

OSunday:

I understand the necessity of appealing to a wide variety of potential buyers budgets but I'm not a fan of toned downed products with reduced hardware specs unless its for a specific purpose other than to make a sale.

The Raspberry Pi's Model A is a great example of this.

Sprint made more profits from their temporary phones then they did their contracts in 2010.  I imagine that trend is still the same.  While the majority of us here are users of some of the higher end phones, our nation reflects a different different.  People need low end phones, rather it be because of a budget, a childs first phone, or perhaps they need a "burner".  

  Every drug dealer I've ever heard of carried a cheap phone.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 897
Points 8,310
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: LA, CA
sevags replied on Sun, Dec 16 2012 3:10 PM

How much? This better be a free phone after contract.

Even then... $99 for a lumia 920... So even free the 505 would be over priced, on contract they should be giving YOU $99 for accepting this phone.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 1,016
Points 10,925
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Mcallen, Texas
OSunday replied on Sun, Dec 16 2012 8:48 PM

I guess that's true but when buying a smartphone, most people are buying into a contract as well and a $50-$100 difference in that initial purchase can make a huge difference in the quality of the phone.

Are you serious about higher profits from temporary phones? I figured with the guaranteed income from contract plans they'd be making most of their bank of those along with additional fee's for data usage on smartphones.. 

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Posts 18
Points 90
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: Estados Unidos

Good Smartphone, the best of nokia!

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Posts 756
Points 7,635
Joined: Nov 2012
Location: Dallas, Tx
Dorkstar replied on Tue, Dec 18 2012 8:15 AM

OSunday:

I guess that's true but when buying a smartphone, most people are buying into a contract as well and a $50-$100 difference in that initial purchase can make a huge difference in the quality of the phone.

Are you serious about higher profits from temporary phones? I figured with the guaranteed income from contract plans they'd be making most of their bank of those along with additional fee's for data usage on smartphones. 

Yep, I wish I could the article, but it's shocking how much they actually make off of boost mobile.  It's more because of their market dominance in the pay as you go phones, but still.

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (7 items) | RSS