Zensorium Introduces a New Way to Measure Cardiorespiratory Health & Stress Levels On-the-Go

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OSunday Posted: Thu, Dec 6 2012 12:52 AM

“Monitoring cardiorespiratory health  and stress levels are an important yet neglected aspect of understanding one’s health and wellness progression which is in line with the Quantified Self movement” said Juliana Chua, Principal of Zensorium's Business Innovation Group. “Tinké’s compact, innovative and unique design with no‐fuss portability means that it can be used anytime, anywhere.”

https://www.swiftpage3.com/speasapage.aspx?X=2V0ZY7GAI4W47UTG00VQWQ

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Ehh... consumer medical equipment.  We had an acronym for them in the Army, I can't recall what it was (something about use it until it breaks).  Basically, companies release these things, consumers pick them up and think thy are getting accurate results, then they bring them to use when they don't work and we throw them away.  These are literally so inaccurate that we don't even consider them medical devices.  In my opinion, they should never be marketed as medical devices, more like "ballpark measurement" devices since you can't calibrate 99% of these things, and there typically is no way in verifying the accuracy after it's left their manufacturing plant.  I'm not saying it's useless, I'm just saying expect a good 10%-20% margin of error.  Don't use this for research ;P

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OSunday replied on Thu, Dec 6 2012 10:04 PM

Haha wow, I didn't know that at all, or that you'd been in the Army?! (I'm guessing something medical related, enlisted?)

But that's totally understandable but I figured it might've been somewhat useful for health monitoring or gauging your fitness and general health but I guess not.
What exactly is it that makes it of lesser quality? It seems like those little blood testers people use with Diabetes work pretty well or would that not be considered consumer medical equipment? 

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Dorkstar replied on Fri, Dec 7 2012 10:51 AM

OSunday:

Haha wow, I didn't know that at all, or that you'd been in the Army?! (I'm guessing something medical related, enlisted?)

But that's totally understandable but I figured it might've been somewhat useful for health monitoring or gauging your fitness and general health but I guess not.
What exactly is it that makes it of lesser quality? It seems like those little blood testers people use with Diabetes work pretty well or would that not be considered consumer medical equipment? 

Yeah, I was a biomedical equipment technician for 8 years in the Army.  I'm just glad to be out now.  

The problem is, any electronic has the ability to loose calibration over time.  Components get old, they get hot, they get cold, and they just change to the slightest degree and everything gets thrown off.  With those really small devices like these, you just can't crack them open check a few measurements and adjust a few settings.  Most of the time they are sealed, if they aren't sealed, there is typically no way to calibrate the device.  Those blood testers at the stores are probably self-calibrating, or they have someone come check it every few months.  But this doesn't mean it's in anyway accurate, almost everything can self calibrate nowadays. 

A good example of all of this is an ESU (electrosurgical generate), AKA the "knife" used to cut your open and cauterize your wounds at the same time.  Obviously you want this thing as accurate as you can get it.  For these devices (and vital sign monitors as well) we have test equipment that is also calibrated, where we can plug the knife into and test the output.  Once we see it's not within the tolerance by the manufacturers specifications, we turn a few potentiometers on the board until it gets within tolerance.  Now, if this were a device like the one you posted, you probably wouldn't be able to calibrate it, and you'd just be setting the power to say 200 joules, and you're shooting 300 joules through the patient instead, igniting their skin and burning a hole 2 inches deep into who knows what body cavity.  

  Obviously that is more of the extreme there, but there's a reason medical devices have to cleared by the FDA before they can be used on a patient.  Although as our technology grows a lot of things are becoming available that weren't before.  Like how they have phone app's that can tell you your heart rate now by counting your blood pulsing through a finger.  Again, is it 100% accurate?  No, but it's still neat as hell that we can do it on phone.

 

(Pardon the book here, I'm attempting to quit smoking today and I'm trying to keep occupied)

 

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OSunday replied on Sat, Dec 8 2012 12:44 AM

That's cool, I'm in a commissioning program for the Air Force and college right now.

But yeah I understand what you mean, what's your take on those disposable laser scalpels that are incredibly inexpensive to make and are apparently somehow powered by a battery or something of the sort?

and on a similar note, what's your take on this?

..Star trek technology... brought to reality... for medical purposes... you're analysis should be good lol

http://gizmodo.com/5965143/holy-spock-the-star-trek-medical-tricorder-is-real-and-its-only-150?utm_source=Gizmodo+Newsletter&utm_campaign=84af0ddfe4-UA-142218-3&utm_medium=email 

And congrats on quitting smoking!
If you're having trouble with breaking the craving have you considered e-cigs?
I got one because I found a deal on reddit freebies for a starter kit for a penny, I don't really smoke but every now and then my buddies and I like to smoke a cigar or two and this thing just looked cool and was as close to free as possible so I got it out and its, interesting?
I still gizes a similar nicotine buzz, has different flavor cartridges and such and is water vapor instead of smoke with harmful carcinogens and combustible in them. I also play football so smoking and maintaining my health counteract each other which was why I thought I'd give the e-cig a go for fun too 

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I checked out that scandu thingy, looks cool, but sounds like bullshit.  Apparently they have another device you pee on and it detects infections.  Right....

 

I tried e-cigs for a good while when my wife first got pregnant, but after a few weeks I started wheezing at night and couldn't sleep because I was hacking stuff up.  So I switched back to cigarettes, and the wheezing got a little better, it's still here, and I really should go to the doctor.  We got insurance coverage, i'm just one of those old fashioned types that only goes to the doctor if i'm dying.

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OSunday replied on Sun, Dec 9 2012 9:28 PM

Haha nooo!
/Startrek tech dreams crushed

But yeah I used the e-cig this weekend and noticed it made me cough a lot.. but that could be because I don't smoke, or that I have absolutely terrible allergies aha. Anyways at least you can identify the problem, that's the first step towards a solution. And a quick check up at the doctor never hurts either ya know. 

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