Dropbox Doubles Capacity, Leaves Prices Alone; Also Adds 500GB Option

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News Posted: Wed, Jul 11 2012 1:23 AM
If you woke up this morning to find that your Dropbox Pro account doubled in size while you slept, here’s why: Dropbox really wants to keep you as a customer. In an effort to stay competitive in the cloud storage space, Dropbox just announced a huge upgrade to its Pro plans, which are now available in 100GB and 200GB capacities. These supplant the previous options of 50GB and 100GB.

Lest your dander rise at the audacity of Dropbox to automatically do such a thing, note that the upgrade is free to current Pro account users, and any new sign-ups will get the same deal. This isn’t a temporary promotion or something; it’s a permanent change.
Drew Houston and Arash Ferdowsi, Founders of Dropbox
Drew Houston and Arash Ferdowsi
Founders of Dropbox


In addition to the new higher-capacity options, Dropbox also added a much-needed 500GB Pro plan, which will run users $49.99 per month/$499 per year. The 100GB plan now costs $9.99 per month/$99 per year, and the 200GB option is $19.99 per month/$199 per year.
Dropbox 500GB option
Dropbox has added a 500GB option, too

Although it’s as popular with average users as can be, Dropbox needed to make such a change. Prices for cloud storage are falling like rain in Seattle, and this new deal ensures that users stay put and new customers join up. For good measure, Pro users can share a three-month trial of Dropbox to share with that special cloud storage-less someone in their lives.
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mhenriday replied on Thu, Jul 12 2012 6:43 AM

Equally interesting to note what Dropbox hasn't chosen to do ; viz, increase the storage capacity of its free service from currently 2 GB to say, 5 or 10 GB, in order to meet competition from such services as Google Drive, which currently offers 5 GB for free. Should this be interpreted to mean that Dropbox doesn't regard competitors as a threat ? Unlikely, for in that case the firm would hardly have doubled the capacity on its for-pay services without a corresponding price increase. My guess is that Dropbox feels that 2 GB remains sufficient to entice ordinary users to test the service, while businesses are going to move directly to the for-pay services....

Henri

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