What performance expectations can we make about APU's in the future?

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DWhite Posted: Fri, Mar 25 2011 2:16 AM

Ok, so APU's or Accelerated Processing Units are the future of computing. It replaces/ integrates the CPU and GPU all in one chip. How powerful do you think these will be in 5 years, and do you think they will be able to play Crysis at a decent setting? Examples of current APU's: Intel Core 2nd generation (Sandy Bridge); AMD Fusion

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Maybe, but its hard to say. The one real advantage of them begin separated you can upgrade them independently. I believe SB can actually run crysis on med settings. 

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DWhite replied on Fri, Mar 25 2011 10:53 PM

Really?! That's insane I will have to look more into that. I thought that the fact that they are integrated, is you can make an instant upgrade by just buying a newer APU, then you wouldn't have to worry about upgrading the GPU and CPU.

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AKwyn replied on Fri, Mar 25 2011 11:38 PM

DWhite:

Really?! That's insane I will have to look more into that. I thought that the fact that they are integrated, is you can make an instant upgrade by just buying a newer APU, then you wouldn't have to worry about upgrading the GPU and CPU.

I tent to disagree. The CPU can be overclocked to reach equivalent performance to the higher performing CPU's, hell I've got mine running at 4.0GHz right now.

Also the graphical powers of an APU are not up to par with a high-end GPU if you decide to upgrade, I still feel like GPU's have a lot of graphical potential that the APU's will take a long time to harness. Just because it's integrated does not mean it's a wise upgrading decision, if the APU can reach the levels GPU's like the GTX 580 are at now then... yeah, I will think of APU's as powerful but then again we're nowhere near shrinking a GPU like the GTX 580 and integrating it inside of a CPU.

I'm guessing in 5 years, the APU's will be able to run Crysis at high settings, not very high, but high.

 

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DWhite replied on Sun, Mar 27 2011 1:25 AM

Interesting. So where would I put an APU on my motherboard if I was to order one? where the CPU goes, or does it need a new dedicated spot on newer motherboards?

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AKwyn replied on Sun, Mar 27 2011 4:33 PM

I'm guessing the APU would be integrated into the CPU itself, kinda like how Sandy Bridge is integrating the GPU into the CPU.

 

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DWhite replied on Mon, Mar 28 2011 1:52 AM

No, I mean would the APU go in the CPU spot?

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DScheive replied on Mon, Mar 28 2011 5:27 AM

yes the APU goes where the CPU is... because the GPU's normally are in card slots and CPU's are in sockets... the are obviously going to shove the GPU into the faster location on the motherboard :)

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acarzt replied on Mon, Mar 28 2011 12:56 PM

And APU is built into the process and it is very specific in what it does.

For example in Fusion the APU is meant to be a graphics accelerator. In Sandy bridge it speeds up video encoding/decoding. Etc.

An APU is not and will not ever be a CPU replacement, and it would be pointless to have it as a seperate peice of hardware to tack onto the motherboard.

That would be overly complicated, counter productive and just utterly pointless.

The CPU is the Central Processing Unit. It does everything. You tack on an APU, to make it better at 1 thing. I'd rather have a high end CPU and a very programmable high end GPU, than 50 APUs to each do 1 thing.

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acarzt replied on Mon, Mar 28 2011 12:59 PM

New ISA's are the near future for computing.

Quantum Computing is way out in the future and it will drasticly change everything.

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AKwyn replied on Mon, Mar 28 2011 3:07 PM

DScheive:

because the GPU's normally are in card slots and CPU's are in sockets...

I think you meant to say that most GPU's are PCI-Express cards that you install into PCI-Express slots, though there are quite a few integrated into the motherboards, not the level of a GTX 580 though.

 

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acarzt replied on Mon, Mar 28 2011 4:48 PM

Integrated graphics are GPUs... what you mean is integrated graphics are not at the level of a discrete graphics card solutions.

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wuliheron replied on Wed, Sep 21 2011 7:39 PM

Those who forget history are destined to repeat it. The whole point of the first integrated circuit was to squeeze more parts into a smaller package. Ever since the whole motherboard has slowly been migrating onto a single chip with increased functionality for added value. The latest rumors are that Intel has already managed to piggy pack 1GB of vram onto an Ivy Bridge for roughly the bandwidth of a radeon 5770. That's the immediate future, everything but system ram and long term storage on a single chip.

For upgrading, merely plug a second chip into a second socket in crossfire/sli. Lower power requirements, smaller package, less cooling required. No more fancy motherboards with lots of little do-dads and capacitors. Cheap disposable technology that eventually will lead to the same trends we see today in things like stereos. When I was a kid people used to build their own stereos as a way to save money, but these days an ipod can produce better sound then anything we could build.

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Nice. So where would I put an APU on my motherboard if I was to order one? where the CPU goes, or does it need a new dedicated spot on newer motherboards?

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