DirectX10 and 11 on Linux

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3vi1 Posted: Tue, Sep 21 2010 9:26 AM

Luca Barbieri just committed a DirectX state tracker to Gallium3D.

http://cgit.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/commit/?id=92617aeac109481258f0c3863d09c1b8903d438b

This means that programs on Linux can pass DirectX 10, 10.1 and 11 calls directly, without the overhead of converting them to OpenGL first.

The question that immediately comes to my mind is, will Wine ever use it?  I don't think Gallium's available for the Mac, and they've been completely against implementing anything that wouldn't be 100% cross-platform.  I'm not sure it would even help gaming much anyway, as most games are DX9, and that's already supported pretty well in Wine's current OpenGL conversion code.

 

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

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acarzt replied on Sun, Sep 26 2010 5:05 PM

I think the next time I reimage my system... I am gonna dual boot linux and try some of this stuff out.

Plus it would realy help to have linux experience on my resume :-P

Any suggested version of Linux for a Linux newb like myself?

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Inspector replied on Sun, Sep 26 2010 5:22 PM

i have ubuntu linux on dual boot with windows 7 pro. I was going to install centos but had trouble getting it to dual boot.

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3vi1 replied on Sun, Sep 26 2010 6:28 PM

acarzt:
Any suggested version of Linux for a Linux newb like myself?

I'd be glad to!  I have two options for you:

The first is Linux Mint Debian.  I tried Linux Mint  a couple of days ago and found it to be a very nice distribution.  Mint is a fork of Ubuntu, so they have a lot in common (including software repositories).  I think Mint's Gnome interface is setup so that it would be more intuitive for someone coming from Windows to use than the default setup that ships with Ubuntu. 

If you're a little more confident and want a more powerful desktop, I'd check out Kubuntu.   That's an Ubuntu derivative that uses the KDE desktop (you can actually install the Gnome desktop too, and the LXDE desktop, and XFCE, and any other desktop and choose which to use from the login menu).  The latest beta build (the final will be released 10/10/10) of Kubuntu 10.10 can always be found here (you most likely want the AMD64 iso).  Don't worry about upgrading to the final version if you install the beta now - the Linux package manager will keep you up to date on changes and smoothly promote you to the final version (and allow you to upgrade to any future alpha/beta/final versions) without ever needing to re-install.

Also, You don't need to re-image your system before installing Linux.  Both of the above distros use the ubiquity installer, which will allow you to resize your Windows partition and install Linux in the free space.  I did it on this system that came with Windows 7 and haven't had any issues.  Just back up everything first just in case.  It will also install the Grub bootloader, which will give you the option to boot Linux or Windows at startup.

I had been considering writing up a guide that runs through general Linux info a new user might want to know.  Maybe you could help me:  If you have any questions, like "what's the difference between Gnome and KDE" or "what's up with all these file system format options" feel free to send them my way or just ask them here.  It's been a while since I first started using Linux, so it's hard to remember all the kinds of questions I had at the start.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

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acarzt replied on Sun, Sep 26 2010 11:32 PM

Well I plan to eventually upgrade to Win7 and I might swap my SSDs for something faster, and with trim lol

Plus i've got other hard drives that I can install linux on now, if I so choose.

Got any reading material you would recommend to me? Or something useful to help me learm some command line linux as well?

On A side note, I think learning command line linux will start to really mess me up, I already sometimes try to run cisco commands in dos and vice versa lol

I really should learn more VB Script too lol I just can't pull myself away from batch script lol

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3vi1 replied on Mon, Sep 27 2010 9:56 AM

acarzt:
Well I plan to eventually upgrade to Win7

Ah.  Yes:  If you're going to upgrade Windows, a clean install is the best policy.  Incidentally, you'll find it's not necessary on the Linux side of the world - because there's no registry to fill up with crud.  All application user settings are stored in hidden directories beginning with a '.' in the users home directory, and all system-wide settings live inside of /etc.  This makes it incredibly easy to backup and restore them.  You can even change entire Linux distros and still carry over your settings.

acarzt:
Got any reading material you would recommend to me? Or something useful to help me learm some command line linux as well?

To tell you the truth, you don't really have to do anything from the command line nowadays in Linux, unless you really want to as a speed optimization thing.

If you do want to use the command line for something, there are two commands you should know:  apropos, and man.  They will allow you to figure out just about everything else.

For instance, if you want to know commands related to renaming:

evil@saturn:~$ apropos rename
dpkg-name (1)        - rename Debian packages to full package names
git-mv (1)           - Move or rename a file, a directory, or a symlink
ldap_rename (3)      - Renames the specified entry.
ldap_rename_s (3)    - Renames the specified entry.
mmove (1)            - move or rename an MSDOS file or subdirectory
mren (1)             - rename an existing MSDOS file
mv (1)               - move (rename) files
prename (1)          - renames multiple files
rename (1)           - renames multiple files
rename (2)           - change the name or location of a file
rename.ul (1)        - Rename files
renameat (2)         - rename a file relative to directory file descriptors
XStoreName (3)       - set or read a window's WM_NAME property
XStoreNamedColor (3) - set colors
zipnote (1)          - write the comments in zipfile to stdout, edit comments and rename files in zipfile

You could then use the man command to find out more about exactly how to use the 'mv' command:

evil@saturn:~$ man mv

NAME
       mv - move (rename) files

SYNOPSIS
       mv [OPTION]... [-T] SOURCE DEST
       mv [OPTION]... SOURCE... DIRECTORY
       mv [OPTION]... -t DIRECTORY SOURCE...

DESCRIPTION
       Rename SOURCE to DEST, or move SOURCE(s) to DIRECTORY.

       Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.

       --backup[=CONTROL]
              make a backup of each existing destination file

       -b     like --backup but does not accept an argument

       -f, --force
              do not prompt before overwriting

       -i, --interactive
              prompt before overwrite

       -n, --no-clobber
              do not overwrite an existing file

       If you specify more than one of -i, -f, -n, only the final one takes effect.

       --strip-trailing-slashes

Every command/app has a man (manual) page, and many of them go on for pages and pages.

Other quick commands:

ll:  Long List (like a 'dir' where you see file details).  You might need to use 'ls -l' if the distro you use doesn't have an alias set up.  You can add your own alias via editing your .bashrc file.

nano: A popular text editor that you can use from a console window.  If you ever break your system, you'll probably use this to edit a config file.  When your system is un-broken, you'll most likely prefer the graphical gedit or kate instead.

sudo:  Run a command as a different user (root by default).  This one comes in handy when you need to edit a system config file or install software from the command line.

apt-get:  Allows you to download and install packages from the command line (for systems that use APT repositories; other distros may use RPM or yum).  Ex.:  'sudo apt-get install kstreamripper' to install a (graphical) application that allows you to rip songs from streaming Internet radio stations.

I'm not familiar with any books from a user-perspective, but I would recommend Wrox's "Beginning Linux Programming" if you want to learn everything from writing simple shell scripts to writing full-blown graphical C apps.  It's amazing the breadth of topics Linux books can cover when all the compilers and tools are free and easily installed (if not already on the system).

acarzt:
On A side note, I think learning command line linux will start to really mess me up, I already sometimes try to run cisco commands in dos and vice versa lol

Hehe... I do work in Cisco devices almost every day too, so I know what you mean.  It's not so bad though.  Just keep using the tab-completion feature for your commands (I was so happy when they finally added that to Windows too).

acarzt:
I really should learn more VB Script too lol I just can't pull myself away from batch script lol

I'd say javascript would be a better choice. :)   If you ever get to building ASP.Net pages, or any other web development, any code in VBScript is only going to work in IE, whereas the javascript will work cross-platform/browser.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

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realneil replied on Mon, Sep 27 2010 8:04 PM

acarzt:
Any suggested version of Linux for a Linux newb like myself?

Google for these two: PC Linux Enlightenment E-17,........ just got it and it's OK.

And as always: Ubuntu 10.10 BETA is easy to learn too.

You can D/L them as an ISO file and burn them to a CD. Then boot to them so you can run them without installation to see if you like it or not. When it's in CD mode, the system is a little bit slower because it's not on a speedy hard disk drive.

Dogs are great judges of character, and if your dog doesn't like somebody being around, you shouldn't trust them.

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realneil replied on Mon, Sep 27 2010 8:06 PM

3vi1:
To tell you the truth, you don't really have to do anything from the command line nowadays in Linux

And that's how I use Linux. I don't mess with commands, I just point and click and it works great too.

Dogs are great judges of character, and if your dog doesn't like somebody being around, you shouldn't trust them.

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3vi1 replied on Mon, Sep 27 2010 9:24 PM

realneil:

PC Linux Enlightenment E-17,........ just got it and it's OK.

I'm not that crazy about the Enlightenment desktop (It was the first thing I replaced back when I was using Yellow Dog Linux on the PS3).  I'd definitely recommend going with a Gnome or KDE based desktop instead.  Gnome and KDE are going to have better support for compositing (particularly KDE, where it's built into KWin).

I'm also not so sure that PCLinuxOS has the most stable future given what's been happening in the Mandriva camp lately.

I totally agree on the Ubuntu/Kubuntu beta though.  They even have graphical utilities to allow you to install the closed-source binary video driver blobs.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

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realneil replied on Tue, Sep 28 2010 8:39 AM

3vi1:
I'm not that crazy about the Enlightenment desktop (It was the first thing I replaced back when I was using Yellow Dog Linux on the PS3).  I'd definitely recommend going with a Gnome or KDE based desktop instead.  Gnome and KDE are going to have better support for compositing (particularly KDE, where it's built into KWin).

I'm also not so sure that PCLinuxOS has the most stable future given what's been happening in the Mandriva camp lately.

_________________

I'm just D/L'ing them and checking them out. I'm grading the interfaces as to whether or not they're doable, or not, for me. I know nothing of the politics that may be going on behind the scenes either.

Ubuntu remains my favorite distribution because it's full flavored, stable, and easy as Heck to operate.

Dogs are great judges of character, and if your dog doesn't like somebody being around, you shouldn't trust them.

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I've been playing with a few different distros over the past few weeks. On my desktop I'm running my tried and true fav Ubuntu with KDE installed I'm really trying to like KDE 4 because it's awesome I have been using Gnome since before Ubuntu was around so I think I am just stuck on what I know.

On my netbook I installed the new Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook install and I really didn't like Unity. It was really slow and even with just the web browser it was all but totally unresponsive.

I actually installed Linux Mint after that. Like 3vi1 said it is a great distro based off Ubuntu. It was really nice to have all the usual codex installed along with things like Flash and Java. Ran really well. The only thing that bugs me is they way the change the search in firefox. They change it into a custom Google search with ads at the top. I understand that you need to make money and all, but it takes away the links for image search and all the other stuff usually on the left hand side. If you use Opera or Chrome it's not a issue.  It's just that with such a nice elegant OS that seems to do everything right it is such a glaring inconvenience, at least for how often I use the google search bar. I'm bashing, but everything else on the OS seemed really solid and well put together. And again it's not hard to get around that and it is a way for the owner of the distro to make money so maybe I'm just being a cry baby about it. The networking tools in particular are really really nice in Mint.

Right now on my netbook I'm running Lubuntu which is your basic Ubuntu install with LXDE instead of Gnome or KDE. It's my first time using LXDE and it feels like a light weight Gnome. Over all for the moment I am pretty happy with this install. Nothing really exciting.

As far as guides and reading info I used to always use ubuntuguide.org when setting up my install, however I feel like I have learned much more since I stopped as I usually just ended up copy/pasting thing into the terminal instead of actually learning how to do things or what I was pasting actually did. You can totally run Ubuntu without ever touching the Terminal. They have graphical tools for almost anything you would ever need. I still use it from time to time because it's quicker to do some things that it is to open the GUI tool. Then again I still use the cmd prompt in Windows 7 all the time so I'm not your average user.

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