Seagate BlackArmor NAS 440 NAS Device Review

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News Posted: Wed, Aug 19 2009 12:58 PM

With the growing popularity of cloud-based storage solutions, such as the Amazon S3 and Nirvanix services, many businesses--both large and small--are eschewing traditional onsite file servers, and instead opting for offsite, third-party storage solutions. But the ongoing cost of maintaining cloud-based storage as well as the often unproven reliability of it makes it a less than ideal solution for some businesses; and this leaves those businesses with the conundrum of how to store and serve files, provide safe backups, and enable remote access, without breaking the bank.

For such businesses, maintaining an onsite Network-Attached Storage (NAS) solution is often the best answer. NAS devices are much less expensive to own and maintain than traditional file servers, and are often much easier to manage--sometimes even requiring very little networking knowhow. Business-level NAS devices typically differ from consumer-level devices (which are meant for home networking environments) in that they often offer greater data reliability in the form of RAID, and they sometimes even offer data encryption options to keep your files safe from prying eyes.

One such NAS device that is geared for small-businesses is the Seagate BlackArmor NAS 440. The 440 is a four-bay NAS device that comes with four, user-serviceable, internal SATA drives, which can be configured as RAID 0, 1, 5, or 10 arrays, or as JBOD (just a bunch of disks). Depending on which RAID mode is being used, drives can be swapped out without needing to shutdown the device--commonly referred to as hot-swapping. The 440 also includes a total of four USB 2.0 ports, which can accommodate additional storage in the form of external hard drives or for attaching a USB-based printer to make the printer accessible to users over a local network. Another feature of the 440 is that it includes two Gigabit Ethernet ports for port-failover or aggregation.

Seagate BlackArmor NAS 440 NAS Device Review

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ice91785 replied on Wed, Aug 19 2009 6:34 PM

Another NAS, another device that costs WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY more than its worth....

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AMDZFan replied on Wed, Aug 19 2009 9:09 PM

And by a company that certainly knows how to keep your data reliably. Just look at all the glowing reviews on their 1TB drives on newegg :)

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jwrogers21 replied on Tue, Aug 25 2009 11:02 PM

I need a large, nice looking storage solution for a Windows Media Center..would this work and allow me to use media center on my pc under the tv and pull my movies from here?

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ice91785 replied on Wed, Aug 26 2009 2:52 PM

I don't believe this had capabilities what what you would need....its more for just raw storage that you can map to a network (I could be wrong).

Easiest for you would be a Windows-Home Server machine I am thinking :)

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Yeprem replied on Thu, Oct 29 2009 3:46 PM

I bought this unit 3 months ago. It was by far one of the worst decisions I made. No end to my headaches. Going to remove it from the client site, replace it with a Windows XP based PC, and take the hit. It is going in a corner somewhere to collect dust until new firmware is out to fix ALL the problems.

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AHeibert replied on Tue, Mar 22 2011 10:30 AM

(Aggregation provides a wider data pipe by using multiple network ports simultaneously, which--in theory--should improve data-transfer performance.)

*INCORRECT* This is NOT the purpose of link-layer aggregation. Aggregating multiple links is for fault tollerance, it is not some magical 'super speed' option.

And yes, aggregation will hit over-all performance if your network is cheezy, improperly configured or over-all not meant for aggregated devices.

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JVanZandt replied on Sun, Sep 25 2011 12:14 PM

Worst decision I have made was to purchase this device. Not only did the RAID controller corrupt my data (note - no HDD crashes), but Seagate's customer service is the worst in the industry. After reviewing my system, they tell me that my data is all there, but that they need $3-5000 to get it for me. This looks to me like a scam - store your data on this device and then charge me to retrieve it. All because of faulty RAID controller boards (firmware). And this happened twice. So - I will NEVER buy Seagate products again.

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bcc replied on Sun, Apr 22 2012 11:11 AM

This NAS is a well known Non working paperwieght:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Internet_Email/File_Sharing/Q_26632286.html

http://www.boarddigger.com/t-uL73plnSHd3/Networking-Seagate-Black-Armor-NAS-440-specified-network-name-is-no-longer-available

and their own forums, will not even update with new firmware

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