Tweet Your Way to Losing a Job Offer

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News Posted: Tue, Mar 24 2009 12:42 AM

Only a few weeks after a teenager lost a job because of a Facebook update saying her job was boring, a person with "foot in the mouth" disease may have tweeted his way out of a job offer. His update on Twitter:
Cisco just offered me a job! Now I have to weigh the utility of a fatty paycheck against the daily commute to San Jose and hating the work.
A fat paycheck, but work he hates and a rotten commute, eh? He may not get a chance to decide if he wants the offer, as Tim Levad at Cisco tweeted back:
Who is the hiring manager. I’m sure they would love to know that you will hate the work. We here at Cisco are versed in the web.
Oops. It just goes to show you that you need to be careful what you publicly broadcast on Twitter or Facebook (or MySpace, or ...).



theconnor has since protected his status updates, but it's waaaaaay too late. Someone even spent the time and effort to create a site mocking him, CiscoFatty.com.



However, theconnor has put up a blog of his own, at which the first post addresses this whole issue. His post sounds like he may have turned down the Cisco job (his first paragraph says he turned down some job) before even sending that tweet, and that the tweet was meant for his followers, no one else.



Of course, that doesn't excuse the flippancy, but as he says:
Should Tim Levad have backed off? Not necessarily; it was crass of me to say what I did and I take full responsibility for the stupidity of my action. Instead of blaming him, let me use him to illustrate what I have learned: Tim Levad and @timmylevad are two different people. @timmylevad is defined entirely by the number of people listening to it. But whatever @timmylevad says is backed up by the subtle persuasive knowledge that somewhere back there, Tim Levad the person is pulling the strings.
Twitter isn't something we use. Facebook on the other hand, we do. Which leads to other questions. A bigwig at a new company we work for sends us an invite. We really don't want him watching my updates. But if we don't accept we may upset him. So we accepted and limited his access to our status updates.



It's something to worry about in these days of the Web. Watch what you post, or you may be unemployed, or worse.



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dizowned replied on Tue, Mar 24 2009 8:04 AM

I can understand this story/argument, but there really has got to be a breaking point. I mean when does personal space stay personal space? I thought this was supposed to be the land of the free, not the land of the PC (no-pun intended). I mean really people in all honesty who really loves, loves there job to the point where if you were offered a life of comfort to include never having to work again, who wouldnt take it? Responding with a "Thats okay I love my job and publicly traded company that can pretty much drop me at the sign of an "Econmic Downturn" becuase the profit margain isnt allowing our execs to enjoy the finner things in life ...". The reason (or at least from my POV) blogs and "Community" websites were created were to give everyone a place that they could essentially be themselves, and if you have to start censoring yourself for fear of reprecution irl, then whats the point? Bottom Line: The web needs to stay free - its the last bastion of hope.

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Drago replied on Tue, Mar 24 2009 10:03 AM

Its called, dont use the stupid social networking sites for bashing others, or your job. Why people have to use these things and even care about others status's is beyond me. Still any savvy business person will use anything to learn more about a prospective or current employee. Information is powerful, and for those that just tell the world about their stuff, well they should know what they are getting themselves into.

Sure some things are private, but the cease to be private when you put them on the internet as that is a public domain. You can get sued for slander if you say something defamatory in a public place, and the internet is no exception.

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shanewu replied on Tue, Mar 24 2009 4:55 PM

Exactly, drago...the Internet is not "personal space." Free and private are not the same thing, dizowned. Every day in life, many successful people censor themselves and choose tact over rudeness. Why should we not expect the same from people when they go online? Why do people have to get all brave and think the world won't know who they are just because it's the WWW?

Be smart and assume anonymity doesn't exist, and assume anything you say or do could end up on the nightly news. That would stop a LOT of BS from happening in this world.

The Internet is not meant to be a shield people hide behind so they can be pricks, plain and simple. And we really don't care about your status updates, what you're eating, what movie you're going to, etc. Cease with the ego-tripping.

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ice91785 replied on Tue, Mar 24 2009 8:27 PM

I usually just hang post-it notes around my apartment building saying how I hate work and its boring -- see this way its my personal space and no one really knows who did it.

Facebook updates griping about how you hate your job just seem ... juvenile? However bragging about how drunk you were the night before, that is what facebook is truly about

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I know it's mean, but I loled a little at this.

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digitaldd replied on Wed, Mar 25 2009 10:25 AM

This is the exact reason I'm not using any social networks with my real name. Google can kill your job. especially if your entire life is out there for anyone to see. And with people subscribed to social networks that have GPS waypoints of where you are/were at a specific time your boss could actually know that you took a 2 hour lunch or some other sillyness.

 

I have a co-worker who wasn't aware that the RFID cards we use for security can be used to tracks ones goings and comings to/from the office, and if correlated properly with network logins and phone use records you can pretty much pinpoint whether someone is goofing off or not. Thats without even added social network use to the equation.

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ice91785 replied on Wed, Mar 25 2009 10:46 AM

digitaldd:
I have a co-worker who wasn't aware that the RFID cards we use for security can be used to tracks ones goings and comings to/from the offic

So was he/she goofing off? Or did the topic just come up around the watercooler?

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Freeman replied on Thu, Mar 26 2009 1:43 AM

So, funny times.  I worked IT at an engineering firm over the summer, naturally.  Now everyone at this company was technology-ILLITERATE, and I mean that in the harshest sense.  My boss could hardly use his laptop properly.  Anyways, I ended up figuring out how to log all internet traffic, correlate to the computer submitting the request, and log that in excel.

I assembled a database of anyone and everyone looking at inappropriate stuff.  On the final day of my job (last week before school) I blackmailed 17 people for 60 dollars each so that I would not reveal their habits to the higher-ups at the company.

Total Salary for 3 months: 3000 dollars.

Final day payout: 1020 dollars.

Ka-ching.

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digitaldd replied on Thu, Mar 26 2009 9:03 AM

ice91785:

digitaldd:
I have a co-worker who wasn't aware that the RFID cards we use for security can be used to tracks ones goings and comings to/from the offic

So was he/she goofing off? Or did the topic just come up around the watercooler?

A higher-up was looking for them. Asked that a report get run for the last month. found out from report that person has been at least 1 hour late for 3 out of every 5 days. next came phone report which showed several long phone calls to a certain number google the #, its our main competitor's local office. Nuff said..

 

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ice91785 replied on Fri, Mar 27 2009 1:12 AM

Freeman:

Total Salary for 3 months: 3000 dollars.

Final day payout: 1020 dollars.

haha, you jerk -- i'd pry pay you but then slash your tires

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rapid1 replied on Sat, Mar 28 2009 7:08 PM

Getting kicked from consideration for a job for a flippant comment like that is quite ridiculous really. Think about it this way, Cisco's HR has already spent the money to evaluate a candidate for a job. They obviously found his info credible as well as his qualifications. So you have someone that has been evaluated (and the evaluation payed for and completed with positive results on all ends). Then you don't hire him because of a comment on a commute? I mean I agree on the evaluation of his judgment for posting this to Twitter in a way because everyone he's connected to will see it. But come on who doesn't make a light hearted comment on traffic and time on the road etc. This seems either they were looking for a reason to not hire him, or wasteful and almost childish (Jimmy said he wasn't coming to my house cause mom won't let us watch whatever). So somewhat unprofessional in the least by the supervisory person who made this judgment on these factors.

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It wasn't complaining about the commute that lost him the job, it was saying he would hate the work. As an employer you want your employees to enjoy their job so they can be more productive.

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I don't really know what qualifies as credible info as far as job candidates are concerned. i went on a few interviews last year and all they wanted to know was my linkedin, facebook, twitter, yada yada yada insert other social network here. They didn't want actual references they just assumed everything was Ok if you had lots of friends in your profile. Me being an antisocial network kind of guy probably got no consideration even though I know I have actual expeience @ that job and could rattle off what i've been doing for the last decade and how it related to their [the prospective employer's] bottom line.

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