NVIDIA GeForce 3D Vision Glasses Tested

rated by 0 users
This post has 6 Replies | 1 Follower

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 26,405
Points 1,192,760
Joined: Sep 2007
ForumsAdministrator
News Posted: Thu, Jan 8 2009 9:28 AM
NVIDIA is officially taking the wraps off of their stereoscopic 3D technology, now known as GeForce 3D Vision. NVIDIA's GeForce 3D Vision product consists of a pair of wireless, rechargeable glasses, a base station / IR transmitter, and the necessary software and cables to connect the device to a PC. However, it needs some other specific hardware to function properly as well--namely a compatible monitor and graphics card.

We take you through this
new immersive technology from NVIDIA in the pages ahead, along with a video demo of it in action.

 

  • | Post Points: 95
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 5,053
Points 60,715
Joined: May 2008
Location: U.S.
Moderator
3vi1 replied on Thu, Jan 8 2009 12:42 PM

>> "taking the wraps off of their stereoscopic 3D technology"

So, the patent on the Sega Master System 3D Glasses must have finally expired, eh?

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 500 Contributor
Posts 119
Points 1,405
Joined: Oct 2008
Jeremy replied on Thu, Jan 8 2009 4:27 PM

Nope. nVidia had 3D glasses available at the time of the very first GeForce branded cards. The chief complaint about them was always that they cut the screen refresh rate in half. These do the exact same thing, but nVidia danced around it by only making it work with monitors with rather obscene refresh rates.

The old glasses worked off the Z-buffer and thus required minimal extra processing, I'm sure the new process is quite similar though I have yet to see specifics. I think the pricing and the fact that it works with very few monitors will conspire to make this a pretty low seller.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 5,053
Points 60,715
Joined: May 2008
Location: U.S.
Moderator
3vi1 replied on Thu, Jan 8 2009 11:21 PM

>> Nope. nVidia had 3D glasses available at the time of the very first GeForce branded cards.

I was jokingly pointing out that this "new immersive technology from NVIDIA" i.e. "_their_ stereoscopic 3D technology" had been in use for 20+ years.

The z-buffer doesn't really have anything to do with the 3D effect. The z-buffer is used to determine if new pixels will be drawn or if they're behind objects already in a scene. nVidia's technique probably requires 2 of them, since they're duplicating every rendering surface created by the application. The 3D effect is entirely the result of rendering the object from two slightly different camera positions.

There's beauty in the way they did this in the driver to offset the D3D camera position left and right of where the game/software says it should be on every other render, but it hardly seems like a technological breakthrough.

I'll bet if you don't get perfect framerates, the visuals go to hell with tearing super-quick. They probably have the software flip to the other view whether the current one has been completely drawn or not.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 500 Contributor
Posts 119
Points 1,405
Joined: Oct 2008
Jeremy replied on Fri, Jan 9 2009 12:17 PM

A minimum forced framerate? That'd be kinda cute, actually. It's interestig to note as well that the problem I noted with lower refresh rate monitors was always that the imaged "flickered" when using the glass since 60 mHz refresh turned into 30 with the glasses on. I wonder if it does anything to the perception of frame rates. Normally you need around 40-50fps for it to appear really smooth, would it need to be higher with the glasses?

My point with the z-buffer comment was that determining depth isn't really difficult since the video card does it anyway. Switching the perspective back and forth shouldn't result in a large amount of overhead, so there shouldn't be much of any performance hit. Certainly not the likes of enabling AA or AF anyway.

The Elsa 3D glasses were a shade over $100 back in the day IIRC. If these come down to the same price point I might have to check them out.

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Posts 2
Points 10
Joined: Feb 2010
roop452 replied on Wed, Feb 3 2010 1:34 AM

Ashu Rege is coming this February to India's first and independent annual summit for the game development ecosystem - India Game Developer Summit (http://www.gamedevelopersummit.com/) to talk about the novel uses of GPU computing for solving a variety of problems in game computing including game physics, artificial intelligence, animation, post-processing effects and others.

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Posts 1
Points 5
Joined: Jul 2012

i have Samsung LCD but its not 3D monitor, but i ll converted it with my Geforce graphis card,now i m using Discover glasses for 3d , but i wish 2 use these nvidia 3d goggle with IR Emmiter, & my graphics card shw setting for that too....., can i used my LCD moniter for 3D ( Samsung 18.5' inch, SyncMaster B1930) ..because my LCD monitor have only 2 slot, 1 for power supply & other for connection with cpu........please tell me ,hw can i use NVidia 3D vision glasses

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (7 items) | RSS