Components

Based on its features, specs and power consumption claims, Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon 835 SoC (or Mobile Platform, as Qualcomm is referring to it now) was already looking like a notable improvement over the Snapdragon 820 and 821. The Snapdragon 835 is expected to provide up to 11 hours of 4K video playback and more than a day of talk time on next-gen smartphones with a single charge, for starters. However, it will also serve up hours of VR gaming and claimed general performance lifts of up to 25 percent in both CPU and graphics/gaming workloads. Regardless, until now, we could only speculate... Read more...
NVIDIA’s Pascal architecture has been wildly successful in the consumer space. The various GPUs that power the GeForce GTX 10 series are all highly competitive at their respective price points, and the higher-end variants are currently unmatched by any single competing GPU. That may change when AMD launches GPUs based on its next-generation Vega architecture, but that won’t happen for a few more months, so cards like the GeForce GTX 1080 and TITAN X will continue to dominate benchmark charts at least for a little while longer. NVIDIA has since retooled Pascal for the professional workstation market... Read more...
Professional system builders are usually obsessed with silence and cooling. Custom cooling solutions are some of the biggest differentiators in pre-built systems. And one of the chief selling points of aftermarket cooling gear for enthusiasts is noise output, usually listed in decibels. There are even companies, like "be quiet!" for example, that focus on noise output as a main selling point for entire line-ups of cases, power supplies, and heat sinks. CPUs and GPUs are typically what get the most attention when it comes to aftermarket cooling.  Stock coolers on GPUs usually do an adequate... Read more...
Last week, we took a trip to San Diego to meet with Qualcomm and discuss the company's cutting edge 20nm radios and upcoming Snapdragon processors. Unlike the already-launched Snapdragon 801 and 805, these are fundamentally new chips with updated CPU cores as well as Qualcomm's new Adreno 400-class GPU. Qualcomm is announcing two new chips today -- the Snapdragon 808 and the Snapdragon 810. The 810 will be the highest-end solution, with a quad-core ARM Cortex-A57 paired alongside four Cortex-53 CPUs. We've discussed ARM's big.Little implementations before -- unlike the designs we saw debut in 2012,... Read more...
To coincide with the release of Intel's current flagship Sandy Bridge-E processor and companion X79 chipset, a number of Intel’s memory partners released new quad-channel memory kits optimized for the platform. Previous Intel platforms were designed to offer optimal performance with two or three-channel memory configurations; Sandy Bridge-E and the X79 Express, however, perform best with a quad-channel setup. Around the same time, Intel had also defined a new Extreme Memory Profile (XMP 1.3) specification, for easy optimization and overclocking. As such, we thought it... Read more...
It's been several weeks since Asus announced that certain socket AM3 motherboards would support AMD's upcoming Bulldozer processors. Since then, we've turned up additional rumors on the nature of such support. MSI has also announced its own plans to retrofit some existing AM3 boards with Bulldozer compatibility. What follows is the general shape of the situation as we currently understand it. Will AMD Officially Support Bulldozer On The AM3 Platform? No. The recent announcements from Asus and MSI make it clear that some AM3 boards will function with a Bulldozer-class processor installed. With... Read more...
QNAP, purveyor of Network Attached Storage devices large and small, has just recently introduced what it's calling the world's most affordable NAS server with iSCSI. The device they speak of is the single-bay TS-119 Turbo Pro, which we've taken into our labs and scoped out across the pages to come. The device itself is just marginally larger than a typical external hard drive, and at first glance, that's exactly what it looks like. The array of LED-backlit words down the front panel and the port selection around back give away its true nature, though, as this thing is built for networks from the... Read more...
This past weekend marked the twelfth anniversary of a gaming event started by a group of die hard Quake players in suburban Dallas, Texas. Evolving and growing rapidly since its grass roots founding, Quakecon has become the largest LAN gaming event in the United States, with over 3000 gamers attending, some from places as far as Japan, Iraq, and Finland. Put on by id Software with their main sponsor NVIDIA, this year’s Quakecon was filled with gaming tournaments, vendor exhibitors, and new gaming announcements, but the heart of the event was the bring-your-own-computer area, or the BYOC.... Read more...
Home users and Small Business owners can often benefit from technologies that are normally out of reach for some general consumers. Home users may benefit from having a file server for sharing media, transferring large files between PCs, or even remote access while away. Small Office users can utilize the same features as well, while also benefiting from automated backup capabilities, centralized printer management, or even hosting a domain. The problem is, many of these things often require a level of understanding or experience that many home or SOHO users... Read more...
Over the course of the last few years, we've managed to make our way to a countless number of events all over the country. Without question, one of the highlights of each year would have to be QuakeCon. Whereas the foundation of most events is based around a vendor showcasing their latest products, the foundation of QuakeCon is entirely different. Here, the event is based around gamers and is intended as a way to give back to the gaming community. From the LAN party consisting of a few thousand hardcore gamers to the late night parties in random hotel rooms, every aspect of QuakeCon is about having... Read more...
Quantum's Fireball CR EIDE Hard Drive ATA/66... Hot Hardware or Hype? A close look at a new ATA/66 Hard Drive from Quantum   Hard Drive technologies seem to leap frog themselves faster than any other techonolgy in the PC Hardware Arena. What is leading edge technology today will be "old hat" in a matter of months when the next level of performance or density is surpassed and brought to the marketplace. It seems as if 6 month design cycles are common place for drive makers. One of the main bottlenecks in traditional drive systems is the bus interface. SCSI has its advantages over... Read more...
  Quantum's Atlas 10K II Ultra160 SCSI Drive Taking advantage of all that bandwidth 8/27/00 - By  Dave "Davo" Altavilla Interface Speed, Spindle Speed, Access Times and Data Buffers, these are the major components driving the performance levels of any given Hard Drive technology.  Not long ago we brought you a full detailed review of the latest technology in SCSI Interfaces, Ultra160 and the Quantum AtlasV Ultra160 SCSI Drive.   The months have rolled on and so has the product development cycle for Quantum. In addition to this new found interface speed, Quantum... Read more...
  Quantum's Fireball Plus AS 40 Mainstream ATA100 performance @ 7200 RPM 3/5/01 - By  Dave Altavilla The first two Quantum drives we reviewed here at Hot Hardware, were very high end products with SCSI interfaces and targeted at the Server/Professional market.  Today we are going to look at one from Quantum's "Desktop" offering.  This drive is still targeted at the high end of the segment but with an ATA100 interface, it will most likely find its way to a system the likes of which are configured by many of you loyal Hot Hardware readers. As we all know, both spindle... Read more...
  Quantum's Atlas V Ultra160 SCSI Hard Drive SCSI One-Ups EIDE Again! 3/17/00 - By, Dave "Davo" Altavilla We've said this before and we'll say it again, your hard drive is one of the slowest parts of your computer.  Or is it?  Let's take a look at today's computer technology and the speed ratings for various types of components.  Let's see, your main system memory is rated in Nanoseconds.  Your Processor's clock frequency is rated in MHz  Your Graphics card is also measured in MHz for the processor and Nanoseconds for the memory.  Then there is the Hard... Read more...