Processors

Intel has been gradually rolling out its 7th generation Kaby Lake-based Core series processors for an array of computing platforms, from desktops to notebooks and 2-in-1 hybrid devices. We've shown you what Kaby Lake can do for enthusiast and gamer desktop platforms. We've even recently explored optimizing its price/performance ratio through overclocking, and of course, Kaby Lake notebooks led Intel's charge starting in the summer of last year.What we haven't gotten a chance to look at yet is Intel's lowest powered Kaby Lake variant, known as Kaby Lake-Y. Kaby Lake-Y is the the 4.5 -... Read more...
Intel's 6th Generation Skylake family of Core processors has been available for some time now. We previously gave you a look at the desktop variant that Intel initially rolled out. However, the mobile variant of Skylake is perhaps Intel's most potent incarnation of the new architecture that's power-optimized on 14nm technology and with a beefier graphics engine, for more capable thin and light notebooks. In late Q3, Intel started rolling out Skylake-U versions of the chip in a 15 Watt TDP flavor. This is the power envelope that most "ultrabooks" are built with and it's likely to be Intel's highest... Read more...
Today, for the first time since Atom first debuted, Intel is launching an updated version of the core that does more than integrate additional function blocks and lower power consumption. The tablet iteration of the new SoC is called Bay Trail, and it's aimed at the red-hot tablet and handheld market currently occupied by various chips from Apple, Qualcomm, Samsung, and NVIDIA. Our first thought?  Finally. This is what Intel's Atom architecture always aspired to. Intel Atom Z3000 Bay Trail Die - 22nm Low Power 3D Tri-Gate Technology Intel has done some impressive things with Atom, including... Read more...
In Part I of this series, we discussed ARM's business model and how it works with its various partners as compared to Intel. Today, we're diving into a specific technology that ARM believes will allow it to differentiate its products and offer superior performance to Santa Clara and the upcoming 22nm Bay Trail. big.LITTLE is ARM's solution to a particularly nasty problem: New process nodes no longer deliver the kind of overall power consumption improvements that they did prior to 2005. Prior to 90nm, semiconductor firms could count on new chips being smaller, faster, and drawing less power at a... Read more...