Items tagged with Word

The next time you are taking money out at the ATM, be wary of anyone lurking nearby with an antenna sticking out of their pants. They might be stealing your PIN wirelessly. A pair of Ph.D. students at the Security and Cryptography Laboratory (LASEC) of Switzerland's Ecole publique Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), recently demonstrated a number of techniques for listening in on the electromagnetic emanations coming from wired keyboards and interpreting that information into the actual keystrokes pressed. The two researchers, Martin Vuagnoux and Sylvain Pasini, tested four different versions... Read more...
HotHardware told you yesterday about the Associated Press' hardline approach to linking to their news service stories and excerpting their copy. AP seems a little sketchy about the way in which the doctrine of Fair Use is generally understood on the Internet. As if in an attempt to double down on what is fast becoming a public relations debacle for the news service, AP has a web form for bloggers to use when referring to AP news stories, and it's comedy gold. AP wants to charge you $12.50 to excerpt five words from their articles. The New York Times, an AP member organization, refers to this as... Read more...
OpenID is an service which allows users to log on to many different web sites using a single username / password. This eliminates the need to create and remember a strong username / password for each site. The assumption, of course, is you create a strong OpenID.Of course, if that information is lost or stolen, you're in big trouble.  What if there was another level of authentication, however.The new system, CallVerifID, uses your mobile phone to perform an extra security measure before it will authenticate you on its service. It works like this: When you want to authenticate a site using... Read more...
If you thought your own passwords were secure, then you haven’t seen anything yet.   There is an interesting bug in Windows 2000 SP1 and Advanced Server that occasionally produces (and enforces!) the following error:“Your password must be at least 18770 characters and cannot repeat any of your previous 30689 passwords.  Please type a different password. Type a password that meets these requirements in both text boxes.”Luckily there is already a fix in place, but this one is certainly worth a laugh. If you happen to know anyone out there running either of these products, you can give them a heart... Read more...
The tax rebates that are supposed to inject a stimulus into the U.S. economy, as we hope you realize, will only come to those who file taxes this year. And the IRS wants to make sure you know about it. So they've taken an unprecedented step. They have posted a video on YouTube (below) advertising it. Our only comment: when is the last time you trolled YouTube for something from the IRS?... Read more...
No question about this, this is one heck of a bug.A woman was stunned and a software company apologetic after an offensive word showed up on a computerized typing test. Monica Loadholdt was using Perfect Typing Pro, a software program made by Cosmi, when the 'N word' showed up in one of the typing exercises."I just stopped," Monica remembers. "I said, 'What did I just type here?'"Let's make sure we type this carefully: O-O-P-S.... Read more...
We're not referring to just any keyword ad. But 1-800-Contacts is suing Lensworld for buying search link advertising using the keyword: 1-800-Contacts. The downstream effect of a win for 1-800-Contacts would essentially make buying keyword ads that feature things like your competitor's name or trademarks illegal. Google, call your lawyers. In one of best-publicized cases dealing with trademarks in online ads, Google prevailed over insurance giant Geico after trial in 2004. A federal district court judge in that case ruled that Geico hadn't proven that consumers were confused when they were shown... Read more...
Gamers that we are, we suppose we should feel good that "w00t" pwned all other nominees for 2007 Word of the Year.  Or maybe we should be thinking ... eh?Merriam-Webster's president, John Morse, said "w00t" was an ideal choice because it blends whimsy and new technology."It shows a really interesting thing that's going on in language. It's a term that's arrived only because we're now communicating electronically with each other," Morse said.Gamers commonly substitute numbers and symbols for the letters they resemble, Morse says, creating what they call "l33t speak" that's "leet" when spoken,... Read more...
You break into the blog of a security team -  worthy of crowing to your friends.  But they break your password back - using Google.You shouldn't, in theory, be able to extract the original text from an MD5 hash. That would take millions, or at least thousands, of computers running all the time.But Steven Murdoch began thinking. Who is there out there who has thousands of computers running all the time? Um, everyone. And some might be generating MD5 hashes and putting them on the web...He took the hash - 20f1aeb7819d7858684c898d1e98c1bb - from the database and stuck it into Google. Lo... Read more...
Some have suggested that the terms and conditions in the EULA for Google Docs & Spreadsheets imply that Google actually "owns" the words "held" within those documents.  Looking at the clause in question carefully, it looks like the sentence simply needs rewording for clarity.The controversy centers on Google's use of the word "public" in its terms and conditions for Google Docs. One clause states, "By submitting, posting or displaying Content on or through Google services which are intended to be available to the members of the public, you grant Google a worldwide, nonexclusive,... Read more...
The world of doing your word processing on the 'net is officially here, no doubt about it. But how do developers make the programs that people are using these days? While the traditional CD or DVD based (or even large download) software is often written with some variant of the tried and true C programming language, this approach may not be the most suitable to bringing web-based applications to life. So what did Buzzword developer, Virtual Ubiquity, chose? Flash of course. Adobe themselves have been expanding into web-based apps, and it so it would seem very likely that future versions of... Read more...
You knew it wouldn't be long before someone pulled this off.  Wonder if there's a blood-thirsty lawyer or three at Nintendo that might have issues with this small "mod"? "The idea was to take one industrial robot, add a laptop talking to a WiiMote, strap on a tennis racket, have it follow the swings that the user makes, and do it all in a few hours on a Saturday so we could get back to our busy schedules. Of course we had to put on a sword too, and if there was time, maybe an Airsoft gun. Also, we wanted it to fight people, but you can't have everything." Check the vid... Read more...
Bruce Schneier got his hands on a listing of MySpace user passwords that were the result of a phishing attack. He analyzed them for difficulty in cracking them. Guess what? Kids really are dumb. Just not as dumb as you, me, or the average corporate user when it comes to choosing a password: I'm impressed that less than 4 percent were dictionary words and that the great majority were at least alphanumeric. Writing in 1989, Daniel Klein was able to crack 24 percent of his sample passwords with a small dictionary of just 63,000 words, and found that the average password was 6.4 characters long. And... Read more...
A very serious security flaw in Firefox Password Manager has been discovered. It may also be a problem, though less severe, in Internet Explorer. Dubbed a reverse cross-site request, or RCSR, vulnerability by its discoverer, Robert Chapin, the flaw lets hackers compromise users' passwords and usernames by presenting them with a fake login form. Firefox Password Manager will automatically enter any saved passwords and usernames into the form. The data is then automatically sent to an attacker's computer without the user's knowledge, according to... Read more...
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