Items tagged with wearable-technology

As wearable tech concepts go, the idea of a "smart helmet' — a motorcycle helmet equipped to deliver usable information to its wearer via heads-up visuals projected onto the visor, such as GPS data — really is quite smart, allowing riders to keep their eyes on the road. And even smarter? Configuring said helmet to respond to voice commands, allowing riders to keep their hands firmly on the handlebars. So all of this considered, the LiveMap helmet is indeed one wicked smart piece of wearable tech. The brainchild of a group of Russian engineers, the lightweight Android-based LiveMap helmet is fitted... Read more...
ASUS has big plans for the coming year. At this year’s CES in January, ASUS is going to make a splash with new smartphones, and handsets are going to become a major focus for the company. “We remain optimistic about the desktop and laptop market, but our priority is to make the company’s smartphone business turn a profit next year,” said ASUS CFO David Chang to investors at a conference. ASUS expects to grow its smartphone sales by a factor of five, from one million units this year to five million in 2014, and it expects the growth to come in part from more retail stores... Read more...
Not that it’s much of a surprise, but Samsung is developing a device of its own to compete with Google Glass. According to images pulled from a patent filing in Korea, the so-called “sports glasses”, or smart glasses, look quite a bit like Google Glass, right down to the HMD, side buttons (which could be touchpads), and transparent lenses. The specs will reportedly have integrated earphones, and users will be able to listen to music, field phone calls, and more. There’s also an odd plug system with wires extending from both sides of the earpieces and connecting in the middle.... Read more...
Everyone perceives warmth or coldness a bit differently; for proof, just stroll through any cubicle farm and note that while one person is wrapped in a blanket, someone a few doors down is loosening his tie and holding a tiny fan to cool down. Wearable technology may be part of the solution to that problem. A team of four engineering students at MIT developed a thermoelectric bracelet that’s powered by a lithium polymer battery and is designed to keep individual wearers at their preferred temperature. The device monitors both skin and air temperature and sends small pulses of warm or cool... Read more...