Items tagged with watson

Watson made a name for itself when IBM paraded the artificially intelligent computer system on Jeopardy and pitted it against the game show's two biggest winners of all-time -- Ken Jennings, who holds the record for the longest winning streak, and Brad Rutter, the all-time money winner. The supercomputer vanquished its human and flesh opponents, but more importantly, it introduced the world to IBM's impressive technology. Oh, and by the way, you can tap into that big brain of Watson's, for a price. IBM announced that Watson Analystics, a breakthrough natural language-based cognitive service that... Read more...
We often joke about the machines that humans build coming back to rule the planet, but you have to wonder if IBM's Watson isn't scheming in a way that mere mortals can only hope to comprehend. IBM's Watson group has acquired a new company this week, which will enable Watson to become even smarter than it already is. The new acquisition is Cognea, which is said to be an artificial intelligence outfit focusing on "cognitive computing and conversational AI." To date, Cognea has partnered with HP, NASA, and others for virtual assistant program. Specifically, Cognea offers "virtual assistants that relate... Read more...
When you're a computer capable of beating some of the world's greatest chess players, why keep all of that knowledge to yourself? That's a question that IBM is posing to its wildly intelligent supercomputer, Watson, and it appears that Watson has an answer. This week, IBM announced that, for the first time, it will make its IBM Watson technology available as a development platform in the cloud, to enable a worldwide community of software application providers to build a new generation of apps infused with Watson's cognitive computing intelligence. Why make such a move? According to IBM, the move... Read more...
When IBM’s Watson supercomputer proved that the meatsack we call a human brain was inferior to its robot intellect on TV’s Jeopardy, it was an entertaining parlor trick-style PR stunt to show that Watson was capable of “learning”. Now, IBM is putting Watson to use in real life by deploying it in the medical field. According to a Forbes report, IBM has partnered with Memorial Sloan-Kettering and WellPoint to employ Watson to help doctors treat lung cancer patients. Hospitals can access Watson via the cloud or with their own small (not nearly the size of the beast we all saw... Read more...
Well... I'm sure this isn't what the designers behind IBM's Watson supercomputer had in mind when it came to human interaction. As it turns out, Watson, as smart as it is, cannot tell the difference between English words that are appropriate, and then not-so-appropriate. You might immediately realize when a word is derogatory - even if you've never heard it before - but no such luck with Watson. It's a mere computer, after all. The discovery of the issue came about when Watson took on the task of memorizing the entirety of UrbanDictionary - the online human-edited slang dictionary. If... Read more...
IBM's Watson is soon to hit a major milestone: it'll begin to deal with real patients. You might recall that this is one of the major goals IBM laid out for Watson back at its inception. As a "learning" computer, Watson has the ability to peruse information, understand it to the best of its ability, and then develop algorithms based on the information it's learned to help produce some (hopefully) accurate guidance to the patients it deals with. While the ultimate plan is to have Watson-based computers replace doctors to a small degree, it's never going to be the final answer in a serious diagnosis.... Read more...
IBM's Watson supercomputing platform gets around. Its most famous appearance was on Jeopardy, where it trounced the two greatest Jeopardy players of all time by correctly (most of the time) answering questions about history and a number of other subjects. Watson wasn't designed for game shows, however, and has gone on to do number crunching chores for Citigroup and assist WellGroup with providing doctors with treatment options based on mountains of data. The next version of Watson could end up on your smartphone. "The power it takes to make Watson work is dropping down like a stone," Bernie Meyerson,... Read more...
Colossus (from the film "Colossus: The Forbin Project") and Skynet would be proud. IBM's Watson bested its human competition on Jeopardy easily, as it won the second game of the two game, three day event, adding to its total from its earlier game one win to take home the grand prize of $1 million. Watson finished with $77,147, with Ken Jennings coming in second with $24,000 and Brad Rutter last with $21,600. Ken Jennings holds the record for most consecutive Jeopardy wins (74). Meanwhile, Rutter holds the record for the most money won on Jeopardy, $3.25 million. Neither of the humans was able to... Read more...
Sorry humans, but it's time to welcome your new robot overlords. After last night's airing of Jeopardy, it's only a matter of time before our gadgets turn against us, perhaps led by Watson or some other equally intelligent creation. You see, Watson is the name given to IBM's supercomputer, which proved both faster and smarter than the two most decorated Jeopardy champions of all time. Watson, which is much too large to fit behind a podium, was represented by an avatar and fed the questions via text. This occurred at the same time Jeopardy host Alex Trebek read the questions out loud to Ken Jennings,... Read more...
Wow, it's actually happening. If you'll recall, reports were flying last year that IBM's supercomputer, a guy by the name of Watson, would one day appear on one of the most famed game shows in the history of television: Jeopardy!. After two years of development and another year of tweaking, Watson is now starring in a Jeopardy! competition video on the world's most famous video viewing portal. What is YouTube? IBM has pit their supercomputers against humans before. Deep Blue has been known to play chess against some of the world's greatest players, but playing a game with a finite number of moves... Read more...
We know it's cliché, but really, what will they think up next? Just last month, researchers at IBM developed a supercomputer that could track some of the oldest English words to ever be uttered, and now another powerful machine will be tasked with taking on some of the quickest minds this planet has to offer... on one of America's most adored game shows.Yep, sometime in the future an IBM machine will be competing with valedictorians and Quiz Bowl champions of yesteryear on Jeopardy! The system, which has been coined 'Watson,' has taken some two years to develop, with the sophisticated Question... Read more...