Items tagged with viacom

At this point, it's not really a question of whether the television industry will be massively disrupted, but when. Analysts have been expecting Apple to take the lead, but it has been smaller outfits such as Roku and Hulu changing things up. But, there's still no true replacement for pay-TV, at least not yet, as most channels that offer online viewing options won't allow streaming without a pay-TV subscription. But Sony may come out of nowhere and shock us all, according to a new Wall Street Journal report. The company has reportedly inked a deal with Viacom in order to carry MTV, Comedy Central... Read more...
TV is about to get a lot more social. Twitter has made no bones about its ambitions to become the go-to source when it comes to mapping out popularity of television programming, and now, Viacom + Twitter have announced a partnership to deliver social video advertising campaigns around the most popular shows and biggest events throughout Viacom's network portfolio. That portfolio is mighty robust, including MTV, VH1, CMT, Nickelodeon, COMEDY CENTRAL, TV Land, Spike and more. Viacom is the latest media company to join the Twitter Amplify program. The partnership will launch with the 2013 MTV Video... Read more...
Amazon is serious about shoring up its catalog of streaming titles, so much so that it went and cut its biggest check ever for a subscription-streaming license. The Prime video provider struck a deal with Viacom, forking over more than $200 million to secure the rights to hundreds of kids' shows, including the wildly popular Spongebob Squarepants and Dora the Explorer franchises. Citing a "person familiar with the deal," Reuters says the deal is good for more than two years and includes a deeper library of titles than what Netflix previously had access to. Speaking of which, the timing of the deal... Read more...
Intel is getting into the TV business, that much we already knew. But how soon? That's a question that's seemingly close to being answered. According to a new Bloomberg report, Intel -- the chip-making giant -- is "making progress in talks with Time Warner, NBC Universal and Viacom to obtain TV shows and films for a first-of-its-kind pay-TV service." Of course, these reports aren't being confirmed nor denied by Intel, but it's awfully likely to be true. After all, Intel wouldn't announce that it would be trying its hand at TV distribution without some deals being within reach. It sounds as if money... Read more...
Good news for DirecTV customers who have been paying for over two dozen blacked-out channels for the last week or so (seriously DirectTV, can we get some money back on our next bill for that mess?): Viacom and DirecTV have settled their dispute, and Viacom has restored 17 of the 26 channels it blocked when a distribution deal between the two companies expired and new terms couldn’t be reached. It’s not clear what the financials of the new deal are--neither company disclosed them--but a Bloomberg report has it pegged at $600 million. Previously, DirecTV said that Viacom wanted a cool... Read more...
Usually, when industry titans do battle, it’s a good thing for consumers (patent wars notwithstanding). Companies scramble to outdo each other, one-upping the competition’s latest product and forcing down prices, and begging for our loyalty and money. In the TV world, unfortunately, the sniping and quarreling only serve to tick everyone off and suck in innocent bystanders, like an ugly divorce where each partner tries to enlist the support of the kids by bad-mouthing the other. The latest scrum is between DirecTV and Viacom over an expiring distribution agreement; apparently, the two... Read more...
Taxpayers in the United States could soon be stuck footing the bill for some very costly copyright infringement enforcement. For those that don't know, the PROTECT IP Act (Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011 or Senate Bill S.968) is a piece of controversial legislation introduced on May 12, 2011 intended to force private ISPs, search engines and other parties to censor websites accused of facilitating copyright infringement. The bill is supported by a large number of infamous IP-protective agencies, including the MPAA, Viacom, SAG,... Read more...
After some six weeks on the auction block, beleagured Blockbuster has found a buyer. The Dish Network has agreed to purchase its erstwhile competitor. The company won the auction with a bid of some $320 million and expects to pay ~$228 million once other transaction adjustments are completed. The purchase process will reportedly be finished by the end of the current quarter. "With its more than 1,700 store locations, a highly recognizable brand and multiple methods of delivery, Blockbuster will complement our existing video offerings while presenting cross-marketing and service extension opportunities... Read more...
Hulu has struck a content deal with Viacom that returns "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" and "The Colbert Report" to Hulu.com and brings shows from other networks to the subscription service, Hulu Plus. At the same time, Hulu's CEO hinted that the days of fully free access to the service might be numbered. The agreement covers shows on Comedy Central, MTV, BET, VH1, Spike TV and TV Land. As of February 2, current, full episodes, of "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" and "The Colbert Report" became available on the free Hulu.com service as well as Hulu Plus. Now, if... Read more...
YouTube has won the lawsuit filed against it by Viacom, over copyright infringement. That said, Viacom has promised to appeal. YouTube had used the "safe harbor" provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) as its defense, and U.S. District Court Judge Louis Stanton agreed. Those provisions protect sites and ISPs against any copyright infringement by their end users. Meanwhile, Viacom contended that copyright-infringing content was so abundant on YouTube, that suggesting that YouTube didn't know they existed on the site was ludicrous. Stanton disagreed, nothing that once notified of... Read more...
We don't enjoy saying that the first ball has dropped here, but it sure seems that way. Hulu, which was called by NBC an "evil plan to destroy the world," might just be destroying NBC's hope of raking in any serious profits. The site delivers all sorts of television programs to online viewers at no cost, only requiring them to watch ads along the way. For many, it has been seen as something that was "too good to be true." But still, Hulu was making money from ads, and viewers were tuning in in greater numbers due to the flexibility of being able to watch their favorite shows whenever they pleased.... Read more...
Earlier we reported a court decision that handed over all YouTube user data to Viacom. As we know Viacom and YouTube are enmeshed in a lawsuit over copyrighted material uploaded to YouTube. The information was to assist Viacom in its case, but it was unclear why they needed user data to prove the amount of copyrighted material uploaded or viewed.It seems (perhaps?) common sense prevailed, or maybe it was The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) chiming in (thank you), indicating that this was a clear violation of the federal Video Privacy Protection Act (VPPA).Either way, Viacom and YouTube have... Read more...
Google has been ordered to turn over their logs of user activity on their YouTube site to Viacom. Viacom is suing Google over copyright infringement, and wishes to see how many YouTube users actually look at Viacom copyrighted material on the video service, then compare it to the amount of traffic any given non-copyrighted video might garner, in order to prove that Google is making money off Viacom's Intellectual Property, and assess potential damages. As you might expect, privacy mavens are up in arms over a judge ordering that usernames, IP addresses and logs of videos viewed for everyone who's... Read more...
Viacom filed suit against YouTube last year, alleging that YouTube wasn't taking sufficient measures to ensure that copyrighted material wasn't being freely distributed by the YouTube community.  YouTube seems to have taken complaints from Viacom and others seriously, and has developed an anti-piracy technology that requires copyright holders to submit source material to be compared to existing media found on YouTube.Viacom doesn't exactly seem thrilled with this new measure:Appearing at the Web 2.0 Summit Thursday, Viacom CEO Phillipe Dauman said Video Identification falls short of what is... Read more...
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