Items tagged with Thingiverse

How much would you pay for a desktop 3D scanner that let you recreate, via your 3D printer, anything that could fit on it small turntablet? MakerBot thinks you’ll be willing to cough up $1,400, plus another $150 for its MakerCare service and support program, to have a MakerBot Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner on your desk. For hobbyists, that might be stretching it too much, for makers and designers, it sounds like a bargain--at the end of the day, the machine only costs as much as a well-appointed laptop. The Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner works by using a camera and two lasers to capture a rotating... Read more...
The MakerBot Digitizer that the company teased as a prototype back at SXSW earlier this year is coming, and soon; MakerBot says that the Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner will be on sale starting the week of August 19th. That’s next week. The MakerBot Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner is designed to make it easy for the average at-home user to scan an object, create a 3D image of it, and then print it on a 3D printer. MakerBot says that the software should let users create 3D models with just two clicks and produce a digital design file in minutes. Bre Pettis demoing Digitizer 3D Scanner prototype... Read more...
3D printing is an exciting technology to track, in large part because of the implications of a mature 3D printing ecosystem wherein 3D printers are inexpensive enough for the average household to have a good one and there are enough designs out there for people to print whatever they need. Small-scale manufacturing will be revolutionized. A researcher at Michigan Technological University did a study to determine the financial feasibility of at-home 3D printing versus purchasing products online. They looked at how much it cost to make 20 different products at home using a RepRap 3D... Read more...
As guns and their associated violence dominate the current headlines in the wake of the unimaginable tragedy in Connecticut, the focus on and debate over the ability to print gun parts using 3D printing technology has intensified. Though not explicitly motivated by current events, 3D printing company MakerBot has deleted schematics for gun parts from its Thingiverse website. According to Forbes, weapons and weapon component designs had never been allowed on the site, but lax policing allowed them to remain posted, until the last days that is. Lower receiver of an AR-15 (Image from Thingiverse via... Read more...