Items tagged with telecom

Led by outspoken CEO John Legere, T-Mobile hasn't been subtle in its aggressive attempts to win over customers from competing wireless customers, and that's still the case in a new promotion designed to lure Verizon subscribers. It's called the "Never Settle Trial" and is a sarcastic spoof on Verizon's "Never Settle" ad campaign. The Never Settle Trial is exclusively offered to Verizon customers who are willing to test T-Mobile's service against their current carrier. It's a risk free affair -- Verizon customers port their number to a new T-Mobile smartphone while retaining their old Verizon phone... Read more...
Nokia just announced a huge acquisition today, confirming that it is purchasing one of its closest competitors in the network equipment market: Alcatel-Lucent. The purchase price was a hefty $16.6 billion in an all-stock transaction. The acquisition will allow Nokia to better compete with Chinese players like Huawei, which have flooded the market with low-cost networking equipment. According to Bernstein Research, the combined companies will take over the second place spot in the mobile network hardware market with a 35 percent share. Ericsson will maintain its first place position with a 40 percent... Read more...
Earlier this month, Masayoshi Son, CEO of Sprint's parent firm SoftBank Corp., said the wireless carrier would adopt its "street fighter" tactics behind the leadership of newly appointed chief Marcelo Claure. It was also reported that Sprint was testing out new pricing plans as it prepares to battle T-Mobile, AT&T, and Verizon. Apparently pleased with the results, Claure is ready to roll out what he calls "very disruptive" rates next week. During a town hall call on Thursday, Claure identified his three priorities for reshaping Sprint. In order of importance, his priorities are to cut back... Read more...
Much to T-Mobile's chagrin, Sprint is no longer interested in acquiring the nation's fourth largest wireless carrier, and the decision to ditch any potential deal the two may have been negotiating could spark a price war. That's just fine by Sprint, which is testing out new pricing plans as it prepares itself for what could be a fierce fight in wireless. Masayoshi Son, CEO of Sprint's parent firm SoftBank Corp, said his company will infuse the nation's third largest wireless carrier with its "street fighter" tactics through new leadership. Indeed, Sprint already hired a new CEO of its own, replacing... Read more...
Possessing the gift of gab is one thing, but only a handful of CEOs in charge of major companies are willing to speak candidly, even when it means offending rival firms. T-Mobile chief John Legere is one of them and now that Sprint has backed out of merger talks, the spunky CEO is right back at it with a string of silly (albeit amusing) taunts. "Is Sprint a melting ice cube? Looks like it to me. Join the cool brand now!," Legere posted to Twitter. In yet another post, he keeps the taunts coming -- "Join T-Mobile now and jump off the Sprint bus before it crashes." You get the vibe that Legere feels... Read more...
History may look back at this time period and consider it the era of consolidation, especially in the technology sector. Hence, we're not shocked to learn that Sprint has agreed to buy T-Mobile for roughly $32 billion, though there are some significant hoops and obstacles to maneuver if a deal like this is to go through. The first one is coming to agreement on all of the little details. According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, the two wireless carriers both feel the price is right -- Sprint would pay about $40 per share for T-Mobile. However, a formal contract hasn't yet been drawn up.... Read more...
Ever since terrestrial broadcasters shut down their stations and went off the air, the FCC has been mulling what to do with sections of spectrum and how that wireless space should be allocated between wireless broadcasters and other types of use. It's a complicated issue, in that much of the frequency in question is in the valuable 1GHz band. Verizon and AT&T have both expressed a great deal of interest in sucking that bandwidth down -- but given the strength and reach of the two carriers, the FCC is evaluating rules that would limit their spectrum purchases in order to encourage competition.... Read more...
Two events in the telecommunications and cable world this week have highlighted why, exactly, we need net neutrality and stronger protections for consumer rights. First, on the cable side of the business, Time Warner Cable, Cox, Eagle Communications, and Comcast have collectively introduced a bill into the Kansas legislature that prevents any city from rolling out any broadband infrastructure unless said area is completely cut off from the grid. Critically, the bill also claims that a municipality is "providing a video, telecommunications or broadband service" if it works through intermediaries,... Read more...
In a desperate bid to save a sinking ship, Alcatel-Lucent, a global mobile phone manufacturer and telecommunications equipment company, is planning to reduce its workforce by around 10,000 employees by the end of 2015, the firm announced today. The job cuts are part of what Alcatel-Lucent is calling "The Shift Plan," which is an attempt to transform the company by repositioning it as a specialist in the next-generation technologies of IP networking, cloud, and ultra-broadband access. "Everyone knows this plan is the last chance. The company is in a very serious situation," Michael Combes, Chief... Read more...
Wireless carrier T-Mobile USA added 61,000 new customers in the fourth quarter, a vast improvement over the 526,000 subscriber losses it recorded a year prior. Unfortunately for T-Mobile, all those new customers didn't translate into positive revenue growth for the full year. On the contrary, T-Mobile earned $4.9 billion, a decrease of 5.2 percent compared to the same quarter one year prior, though it did mark the second consecutive quarter of sequential growth. "T-Mobile finished 2012 on a strong note, providing a foundation for executing even bigger game-changing moves in 2013," said John Legere,... Read more...
Verizon this week issued a strong challenge to the U.S. Congress to update the nation's antiquated and anti-competitive telecom rules (Verizon's words, not ours), saying that Congress must act now to address telecommunications policies that are broken. "The grinding you hear are the gears churning as policymakers try to fit fast-changing technologies and competitive markets into regulatory boxes built for analog technologies and monopoly markets," said Tom Tauke, Verizon's executive vice president of public affairs, policy and communications, in discussing the Federal Communications Commission's... Read more...
France Telecom-owned Orange is planning to make high definition telephone calls available to British customers sometime this year. The HD voice service will require customers to buy new handsets. In return for upgrading to HD voice service, customers will enjoy clearer mobile phone calls that are said to make you feel as if you're in the same room with the person on the other end of the call. Orange is the first mobile phone company to announce a British HD voice service. The company hopes the service will help encourage a new standard throughout the industry. "HD Voice really does inject a level... Read more...
Telecommuting makes a lot of sense. Having information workers gathered into cubicle farms in a central location is so 1960s. The ability to quickly exchange information from remote locations, coupled with the high cost in time and energy to commute to the old office park, makes it increasingly popular now, and probably the de facto standard in the not too distant future. There's one problem in the short term: Your ISP doesn't care if you exist. ...good luck trying to use your virtual private network, or VPN, while sending e-mail and surfing the Web. According to a Forrester Research study released... Read more...
A massive volume of telecommunications data flows through undersea cables.  We've seen the havoc that's created when one of them is severed, and it looks like the middle-east and western Asia are now experiencing the trouble created when 4 of them are damaged in a little less than a week.Having one cable damaged is unusual, 2 or more in the same time period is very odd, but 4 is virtually unprecedented.“Most telecommunications experts and cable operators say that sabotage seems unlikely, but no one knows what damaged the cables or whether the incidents were related.One theory - that a wayward... Read more...
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