Items tagged with Teardown

If a part goes bad in your PC, you whip off the side panel door, yank out the defective component, and replace it with a working one. But should something inside your tablet give up the ghost, you better cross your fingers it's still under warranty, because in most cases, do-it-yourself (DIY) is going to be difficult. That's true of many slates, including Apple's recently launched iPad Air 2., iFixIt's teardown analysis reveals. Taking center stage on the teardown table this time around is the gold colored iPad Air 2 (gold is best!). Like previous versions of Apple's popular tablet, the iPad Air... Read more...
Apple has a history of trying to prevent owners of its products from mucking around inside its devices, and in case you thought the company turned over a new leaf with its Mac Mini system, think again. Though the previous model was relatively easy to service at home -- it scored an 8 out of 10 on iFixIt's teardown analysis -- the recently announced late 2014 model is an entirely different story. "Sometimes we just don't understand what goes on in hardware designers' heads. Apple took one of their most-fixable, most-upgradable products and broke it," iFixIt laments. "The design didn't change at... Read more...
Apple made a splash during its press event earlier in the week by introducing a new 27-inch iMac model with a 5K "Retina" display. That's not a typo -- at a time when PC sales are still trending in the wrong direction, Apple decided the best way to spark renewed interest into its line of all-in-one systems was by skipping over 4K with a more pixelicious 5K panel. Resolution aside, is the refreshed iMac any easier to tear into than previous models? In a word, no. However, there are some upsides to the iMac's overall design that DIY repair folk (and upgraders) will appreciate. The folks at iFixIt... Read more...
Samsung took a page from Apple's design portfolio when it released the Galaxy Alpha, a handset that looks like a stretched out version of the iPhone 5s, complete with metal construction. Yes, the front and back are still made of plastic, but the metal frame gives the handset a premium look and feel that's not necessarily found on other Galaxy devices. Unfortunately for DIY repair types, this new design to the Galaxy line doesn't make the device any easier to tear into than, say, the Galaxy S5. We'll start with the good news. The folks at iFixIt confirmed that it's still super easy to access the... Read more...
You know what they say about dudes who carry around big phones, right? Indeed, they have big batteries, too! That's especially true of Apple's recently launched iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus models, both of which are bigger than any previous iPhone model. Our friends at iFixIt felt like ending the work week by slicing into these Apple devices, so we get to see just how big the batteries are in these handsets. First things first -- these are Apple devices, after all, and that means it takes some skill and patience to get inside without ruining the hardware. Once again, Apple's preference for less common... Read more...
Amazon turned the tablet market upside down with its low cost Kindle Fire family, and now it will try to do the same thing in the smartphone sector with its recently launched Fire Phone. While that plays out, the Fire Phone has already received the teardown treatment, and lucky for Amazon, passing the test with flying colors isn't a prerequisite for big sales figures. Straight to the point, the Fire Phone isn't a handset you'll have fun trying to repair on your own if something goes wrong. The folks at iFixIt found this out by doing what they always do -- busting out their tools and disassembling... Read more...
The LG G Watch (LG-W100) is notable for at least a couple of reasons, the first of which is that it's one of not very many smartwatches rocking Google's promising Android Wear platform. Tying into that tidbit, it also happens to be the first Android Wear device to get the full teardown treatment from the folks over at iFixIt. How did it fare? Better than most tablets and smartphones. A quick glance at the watch's underbelly reveals a set of familiar T5 screws with swift access to the guts with no adhesive getting in the away. This elicited a hearty, "Thanks, LG!," from the teardown team. Removing... Read more...
If there's a new gadget in the world, iFixit has probably purchase one and promptly torn it apart. Such is the case with Microsoft's new Surface Pro 3 -- the first device that the company is directly marketing as an all-out laptop replacement. Early reviews of the tablet hybrid have been quite positive, but if you're wondering what exactly is within its shell, the teardown linked here has the goods. The gurus at iFixit were pleased with just how slim the device was, but they weren't too keen on the adhesive that was used. Essentially, Microsoft added a lot of non-modular parts in order to reduce... Read more...
Google Glass costs $1,500 for the time being, but a teardown of the spectacles reveals that the total cost of the materials inside totals $79.78. That’s what you’d call a significant markup. TechInsight’s Teardown.com did the dirty work, and they found that the most expensive part was the Texas Instruments OMAP4430 processor ($13.96). Glass also has 16GB of Toshiba EGW1 64G NAND memory ($4.68), 512MB of SK Hynix mobile DDR2 SDRAM ($8.18), a 5MP camera ($5.66), and a 570mAh battery ($1.14). Source: TechInsights The full list is quite interesting, but as the teardown is brief and... Read more...
As gadgets shrink in size, it brings up the question of how feasible it is to perform repairs on your own at home. So far the answer depends on the device, as well as your level of patience and expertise. Some are a bear to repair, and others, like Samsung's Gear Fit, are a bit easier, though it's not without its challenges. The folks at iFixIt recently tore into a Gear Fit and what they discovered is that, with a little work, you can replace the battery. That's always a big plus when it comes to mobile devices, otherwise you're stuck with a hunk of unresponsive electronics once the battery gives... Read more...
Depending on who you ask, Samsung's Galaxy S5 is the best Android smartphone (or smartphone, period) on the planet (Apple and HTC would both object). At the very least, it's in the discussion, as it should be when you consider the spec sheet. Far less impressive, however, is how difficult the Galaxy S5 is to repair on your own. Samsung's Galaxy S5 was the latest device to receive iFixIt's teardown treatment. Things started off well enough -- removing the backplate turned out to be "easier than peeling a banana," with no tools needed, just an opposable thumb. Once removed, users have easy access... Read more...
If handset makers have their way, eventually we'll all be wearing smartwatches synced up to our mobile phones. The verdict is still out on whether this type of wearable has the legs to go the distance in the consumer market, but if it does, what happens when one of these pricey gadgets breaks and is out of its warranty period? Surprisingly, the DIY (do-it-yourself) repair route might not be all that difficult. The surgical sons of guns at iFixIt cleared their operating table of the standard fare -- you know, things like smartphones and tablets -- and strapped down Samsung's Gear 2 smartwatch for... Read more...
There's not a gadget in the world the folks at iFixIt can't tear into, though some are definitely easier to disassemble than others. Mobile devices like tablets and smartphones tend to be difficult to surgically operate on, and even some hybrid laptops can give users fits if there's a need to service or a replace a part. On the opposite end of the spectrum are desktop PCs and iFixIt's teardown of HP's Z820 workstation reminds us why we love this category so much. Back in December, iFixIt tore into Apple's cylindrical shaped Mac Pro, which earned an 8 out of 10 "Repairability Score" for being surprisingly... Read more...
You're not bringing home a Mac Pro for less than three large, and when spending that much on a computer, the expectation is that it will work and work well for a long time to come. Fair enough, but eventually you'll either want or need to dive in; it could be out of sheer curiosity or because a stick of RAM went bad. When that time comes, you'll be happy to know that Apple's cylinder shaped powerhouse is mostly easy to take apart. The folks at iFixIt got their hands on Apple's entry-level model priced at $2,999. This is the configuration that comes with an Intel Xeon E5 quad-core processor with... Read more...
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