Items tagged with Teardown

Dell's new XPS 13 has been compared to Apple's MacBook Air because of its thin stature and overall aesthetic design. However, it's not just the operating system and spec sheet that separates these two laptops, there's also a big divide when it comes to in-home repair. Getting at the guts of a MacBook Air is more challenging than it should be, while the XPS 13 is decidedly easier to open and operate on, according to the latest teardown analysis by iFixIt. There are several different configurations to choose from when ordering the XPS 13, all of them based on Intel's Broadwell-U platform. We recently... Read more...
There have been a lot tablets and smartphones to receive the teardown treatment, so it's nice to see a different kind of product get taken apart. This time it's the Amazon Echo in-home personal assistant thingamabob -- essentially a know-it-all smart speaker that acts like Siri but comes in the shape of a tube with a 2.5-inc woofer, 2-inch tweeter, 7-microphone array, and light ring volume adjustments. Cool stuff, but is it easy to repair?In a word, yes. The nimble fingered folks at iFixIt said there's just a little bit of stickiness holding the bottom rubber lid in place, which is easy to peel... Read more...
We've said it a thousand times before, but to make it a thousand and one, the big trend in mobile design these days appears to be adhesive, and lots of it. Whether it's a smartphone or tablet device, manufacturers seem obsessed with lathering the chassis with glue to seal the front and back panels together. Breaking the trend, Motorola opted for a fistful of screws when designing the Nexus 6 handset for Google.That's not to say there isn't any glue, it's just not as prominent as on other devices. The folks at iFixIt described the use of adhesive securing the cover as "relatively mild," which made... Read more...
We're in the midst of a bad run for mobile devices when it comes to evaluating the level of difficulty in repairing or replacing defective components. Teardown after teardown has shown that mobile device makers are infatuated with adhesive, though there's one portable product that finally bucks the trend -- Amazon's Kindle Voyage. The teardown specialists at iFixIt got their eager mittens on Amazon's latest dedicated e-reader device, and unlike the crop of tablets and smartphones that have landed on the operating table before it, the Kindle Voyage isn't overflowing with glue at every turn (though... Read more...
Editor's Update: 11:26AM EST - Though it may not exist in the original iFixIt article, to be clear, the "glue and hackery" comment was made in an email communication to us. And, to be fair, as an informed redditor pointed out, tablets are tough and the iPad Air 2 scored low as well. Still, it begs the question, could another partner have done better than HTC? ASUS or LG, perhaps? After all, the Nexus 7 (2013) did score a 7 out of 10. If there's one thing that's becoming increasingly evident with each new gadget teardown, it's that tablet makers have an obsession for glue. Now before anyone gets... Read more...
If there's ever a shortage of glue, you can be pretty sure that Apple is partially to blame. When it comes to Apple products, teardown after teardown reveals that the glue-happy company isn't afraid to lather its mobile products with adhesive. We saw it recently with the iPad Air 2, and here again with the recently released iPad mini 3. It took the experienced folks at iFixIt half an hour just to pry their way through the glue that holds the glass digitizer assembly in place. "The iPad Mini continues Apple's repair-impeding practice of keeping iPads together with copious amounts of adhesive. This... Read more...
If a part goes bad in your PC, you whip off the side panel door, yank out the defective component, and replace it with a working one. But should something inside your tablet give up the ghost, you better cross your fingers it's still under warranty, because in most cases, do-it-yourself (DIY) is going to be difficult. That's true of many slates, including Apple's recently launched iPad Air 2., iFixIt's teardown analysis reveals. Taking center stage on the teardown table this time around is the gold colored iPad Air 2 (gold is best!). Like previous versions of Apple's popular tablet, the iPad Air... Read more...
Apple has a history of trying to prevent owners of its products from mucking around inside its devices, and in case you thought the company turned over a new leaf with its Mac Mini system, think again. Though the previous model was relatively easy to service at home -- it scored an 8 out of 10 on iFixIt's teardown analysis -- the recently announced late 2014 model is an entirely different story. "Sometimes we just don't understand what goes on in hardware designers' heads. Apple took one of their most-fixable, most-upgradable products and broke it," iFixIt laments. "The design didn't change at... Read more...
Apple made a splash during its press event earlier in the week by introducing a new 27-inch iMac model with a 5K "Retina" display. That's not a typo -- at a time when PC sales are still trending in the wrong direction, Apple decided the best way to spark renewed interest into its line of all-in-one systems was by skipping over 4K with a more pixelicious 5K panel. Resolution aside, is the refreshed iMac any easier to tear into than previous models? In a word, no. However, there are some upsides to the iMac's overall design that DIY repair folk (and upgraders) will appreciate. The folks at iFixIt... Read more...
Samsung took a page from Apple's design portfolio when it released the Galaxy Alpha, a handset that looks like a stretched out version of the iPhone 5s, complete with metal construction. Yes, the front and back are still made of plastic, but the metal frame gives the handset a premium look and feel that's not necessarily found on other Galaxy devices. Unfortunately for DIY repair types, this new design to the Galaxy line doesn't make the device any easier to tear into than, say, the Galaxy S5. We'll start with the good news. The folks at iFixIt confirmed that it's still super easy to access the... Read more...
You know what they say about dudes who carry around big phones, right? Indeed, they have big batteries, too! That's especially true of Apple's recently launched iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus models, both of which are bigger than any previous iPhone model. Our friends at iFixIt felt like ending the work week by slicing into these Apple devices, so we get to see just how big the batteries are in these handsets. First things first -- these are Apple devices, after all, and that means it takes some skill and patience to get inside without ruining the hardware. Once again, Apple's preference for less common... Read more...
Amazon turned the tablet market upside down with its low cost Kindle Fire family, and now it will try to do the same thing in the smartphone sector with its recently launched Fire Phone. While that plays out, the Fire Phone has already received the teardown treatment, and lucky for Amazon, passing the test with flying colors isn't a prerequisite for big sales figures. Straight to the point, the Fire Phone isn't a handset you'll have fun trying to repair on your own if something goes wrong. The folks at iFixIt found this out by doing what they always do -- busting out their tools and disassembling... Read more...
The LG G Watch (LG-W100) is notable for at least a couple of reasons, the first of which is that it's one of not very many smartwatches rocking Google's promising Android Wear platform. Tying into that tidbit, it also happens to be the first Android Wear device to get the full teardown treatment from the folks over at iFixIt. How did it fare? Better than most tablets and smartphones. A quick glance at the watch's underbelly reveals a set of familiar T5 screws with swift access to the guts with no adhesive getting in the away. This elicited a hearty, "Thanks, LG!," from the teardown team. Removing... Read more...
If there's a new gadget in the world, iFixit has probably purchase one and promptly torn it apart. Such is the case with Microsoft's new Surface Pro 3 -- the first device that the company is directly marketing as an all-out laptop replacement. Early reviews of the tablet hybrid have been quite positive, but if you're wondering what exactly is within its shell, the teardown linked here has the goods. The gurus at iFixit were pleased with just how slim the device was, but they weren't too keen on the adhesive that was used. Essentially, Microsoft added a lot of non-modular parts in order to reduce... Read more...
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