Items tagged with Teardown

The LG G Watch (LG-W100) is notable for at least a couple of reasons, the first of which is that it's one of not very many smartwatches rocking Google's promising Android Wear platform. Tying into that tidbit, it also happens to be the first Android Wear device to get the full teardown treatment from the folks over at iFixIt. How did it fare? Better than most tablets and smartphones. A quick glance at the watch's underbelly reveals a set of familiar T5 screws with swift access to the guts with no adhesive getting in the away. This elicited a hearty, "Thanks, LG!," from the teardown team. Removing... Read more...
If there's a new gadget in the world, iFixit has probably purchase one and promptly torn it apart. Such is the case with Microsoft's new Surface Pro 3 -- the first device that the company is directly marketing as an all-out laptop replacement. Early reviews of the tablet hybrid have been quite positive, but if you're wondering what exactly is within its shell, the teardown linked here has the goods. The gurus at iFixit were pleased with just how slim the device was, but they weren't too keen on the adhesive that was used. Essentially, Microsoft added a lot of non-modular parts in order to reduce... Read more...
Google Glass costs $1,500 for the time being, but a teardown of the spectacles reveals that the total cost of the materials inside totals $79.78. That’s what you’d call a significant markup. TechInsight’s Teardown.com did the dirty work, and they found that the most expensive part was the Texas Instruments OMAP4430 processor ($13.96). Glass also has 16GB of Toshiba EGW1 64G NAND memory ($4.68), 512MB of SK Hynix mobile DDR2 SDRAM ($8.18), a 5MP camera ($5.66), and a 570mAh battery ($1.14). Source: TechInsights The full list is quite interesting, but as the teardown is brief and... Read more...
As gadgets shrink in size, it brings up the question of how feasible it is to perform repairs on your own at home. So far the answer depends on the device, as well as your level of patience and expertise. Some are a bear to repair, and others, like Samsung's Gear Fit, are a bit easier, though it's not without its challenges. The folks at iFixIt recently tore into a Gear Fit and what they discovered is that, with a little work, you can replace the battery. That's always a big plus when it comes to mobile devices, otherwise you're stuck with a hunk of unresponsive electronics once the battery gives... Read more...
Depending on who you ask, Samsung's Galaxy S5 is the best Android smartphone (or smartphone, period) on the planet (Apple and HTC would both object). At the very least, it's in the discussion, as it should be when you consider the spec sheet. Far less impressive, however, is how difficult the Galaxy S5 is to repair on your own. Samsung's Galaxy S5 was the latest device to receive iFixIt's teardown treatment. Things started off well enough -- removing the backplate turned out to be "easier than peeling a banana," with no tools needed, just an opposable thumb. Once removed, users have easy access... Read more...
If handset makers have their way, eventually we'll all be wearing smartwatches synced up to our mobile phones. The verdict is still out on whether this type of wearable has the legs to go the distance in the consumer market, but if it does, what happens when one of these pricey gadgets breaks and is out of its warranty period? Surprisingly, the DIY (do-it-yourself) repair route might not be all that difficult. The surgical sons of guns at iFixIt cleared their operating table of the standard fare -- you know, things like smartphones and tablets -- and strapped down Samsung's Gear 2 smartwatch for... Read more...
There's not a gadget in the world the folks at iFixIt can't tear into, though some are definitely easier to disassemble than others. Mobile devices like tablets and smartphones tend to be difficult to surgically operate on, and even some hybrid laptops can give users fits if there's a need to service or a replace a part. On the opposite end of the spectrum are desktop PCs and iFixIt's teardown of HP's Z820 workstation reminds us why we love this category so much. Back in December, iFixIt tore into Apple's cylindrical shaped Mac Pro, which earned an 8 out of 10 "Repairability Score" for being surprisingly... Read more...
You're not bringing home a Mac Pro for less than three large, and when spending that much on a computer, the expectation is that it will work and work well for a long time to come. Fair enough, but eventually you'll either want or need to dive in; it could be out of sheer curiosity or because a stick of RAM went bad. When that time comes, you'll be happy to know that Apple's cylinder shaped powerhouse is mostly easy to take apart. The folks at iFixIt got their hands on Apple's entry-level model priced at $2,999. This is the configuration that comes with an Intel Xeon E5 quad-core processor with... Read more...
After reading the title, you might be thinking, "OMG why does HotHardware hate tablets?!?!" Don't get us wrong, we think tablets are great for what they're designed to do, but when it comes to servicing and/or upgrading parts on your own, they don't hold a candle next to a traditional PC. Teardown after teardown reveals liberal use of adhesive and other challenging factors, as tablets just aren't built to be cracked open like a desktop. Underscoring this point is iFixIt's teardown analysis of Valve's prototype Steam Machine, a full-fledged PC in a console-like shell. If the Steam Machine design... Read more...
This is a big month for console gamers. Sony last week launched its PlayStation 4 to retail, and tonight at the stroke of midnight, stores like Best Buy will begin selling Microsoft's Xbox One. That means the next-generation console wars will be in full swing, and while gamers debate exclusive titles and which has the superior mix of hardware, one question we can answer is which one is easier to repair. According to iFixIt's teardown analysis of the Xbox One, both it and the PlayStation 4 are equally easy to service at home. The PS4 received the teardown treatment a week ago and earned an 8/10... Read more...
After seven long years, Sony today finally launched to retail another flagship game console. We're of course talking about the PlayStation 4, a $399 system with a x86 foundation that further blurs the lines between what constitutes a console for a PC (we're not saying they're one-in-the-same, just more similar than ever before). To underscore the point, we now have two detailed teardowns of the PS4 that show how easy it is to service at home. The first teardown came courtesy of Sony. In a surprise move, Sony posted a video showing the PS4 disassembled from top to bottom, in part because the hardware... Read more...
Apple may have chosen to quietly launch its second generation iPad mini tablet with an upgraded "Retina" class display, but that didn't stop the folks at iFixIt from snagging a sample for their operating tablet. They made quick work of tearing into the newest iPad mini, which sports a panel that still measures 7.9 inches like before, but with a tastier 2048x1536 resolution at 326 ppi. Does the upgraded panel make a difference in terms of how difficult it is to service these devices? Short and sweet, the answer is "no." The newest iPad mini mustered a rather pathetic "Repairability Score" of just... Read more...
Other than the fact that demand is currently outstripping supply, there's not a whole lot to dislike about Google's Nexus 5, at least on paper. Spec for spec, it's a better version of the Nexus 4, and there are many happy Nexus 4 owners in the wild, You might be one of them. Of course, it would take a hands-on evaluation and formal review to really cover the phone's high and low points, but in the meantime, there's proof outside of a spec sheet that Google has something special on its hands. The gadget nerds (a term we use affectionately) over at iFixIt snagged themselves a newly minted Nexus 5... Read more...
Based on a new report by J.D. Power, there's a good chance you'll be satisfied with the iPad Air, should you decide to grab one. Samsung ranks highest in customer satisfaction among tablet owners, but Apple isn't far behind. However, should something break out of warranty and you find yourself tempted to perform an autopsy, well, best of luck. The folks at iFixIt grabbed themselves an iPad Air and went straight to work disassembling the device in its latest teardown analysis. The unfortunate reality is that most slates aren't real great about promoting DIY repair, and the iPad Air isn't an exception.... Read more...
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