Items tagged with supercomputer

Did you know that there's an actual place in the world called the San Diego Supercomputer Center? Let's just say you just found your next place of employment, huh? It sounds like a pretty awesome venue, and they just announced the launch of what is believed to be the largest academic-based cloud storage system in the U.S., specifically designed for researchers, students, academics, and industry users who require stable, secure, and cost-effective storage and sharing of digital information, including extremely large data sets. Michael Norman, director of SDSC, had this to say: "We believe that the... Read more...
The Chinese have been climbing up the supercomputing staircase for some years; the country's upgraded Tianhe-I system is currently in the lead out of the TOP500. Despite Tianhe-I's success, it may be the last supercomputer China builds using both Intel and NVIDIA parts. (The Tianhe-I originally used 2,560 Radeon 4870 X2 cards, these were later swapped out for NV Tesla M2050 boards.) According to Hu Wei, lead designer at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the country's next TOP500 contender (the Dawning will run mostly, if not entirely, on Chinese-designed microprocessors. Chinese developers have... Read more...
Sorry humans, but it's time to welcome your new robot overlords. After last night's airing of Jeopardy, it's only a matter of time before our gadgets turn against us, perhaps led by Watson or some other equally intelligent creation. You see, Watson is the name given to IBM's supercomputer, which proved both faster and smarter than the two most decorated Jeopardy champions of all time. Watson, which is much too large to fit behind a podium, was represented by an avatar and fed the questions via text. This occurred at the same time Jeopardy host Alex Trebek read the questions out loud to Ken Jennings,... Read more...
It's sort of funny to think about how IBM has changed over the years. Remember when you either had an "IBM-compatible" PC or an Apple? Remember when ThinkPad meant IBM? The company has transformed a lot over the decades, and lately, they've really been on a supercomputer kick. IBM's Watson supercomputer will be on Jeopardy later in the month, representing a huge leap forward in artificial intelligence and speech technology. And now, IBM has landed a deal with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory to use IBM's next-generation Blue Gene supercomputer to "enable significant... Read more...
A game show with two award winners, a famed host, and a supercomputer as a contestant. What is Jeopardy? That's actually correct. Next month, Jeopardy will air a series of episodes with just two human contestants, and one human host. Brad Rutter, Alex Trebek and Ken Jennings will be joined by a rather unusual opponent and guest, an IBM-built supercomputer named Watson. Jennings and Rutter are two of Jeopardy's most winning players ever, while Watson has never actually played on-air before. How will the machine do? Will it embarrass itself? Or will it dominate the humans much like supercomputers... Read more...
NVIDIA isn't just a graphics company. Many only think of the company's GPU line, which is certainly their most forward segment in the industry. But they're also a software company, and they also make all sorts of other hardware (like the 3D Vision kit for example). They also operate in the high performance computing space.  Recently, the Tesla Personal Supercomputer made its debut, and clearly the company has a mind to create even more robust supercomputer systems. DARPA, the U.S. Defense Department's research and development arm, just granted NVIDIA with a huge gift, and a huge responsibility.... Read more...
Supercomputers are everywhere, but they hardly get the attention that they deserve. Hundreds of these huge machines churn out all sorts of data and analysis that many humans use in their everyday life, but most take it for granted. By and large, supercomputers have been "stale" and "boring" to average consumers. After all, you can't exactly buy and use your own supercomputer (at least not without tons of cash and a really good application), but Virginia Tech's new supercomputer is different. As the worlds of the CPU and GPU have collided over the years, the same thing now seems to be happening... Read more...
Supercomputers and mainframes can get somewhat overwhelming to the average consumer, but IBM's latest at least have a video to go along with them. The new contraption is called the zEnterprise mainframe server, which is a new systems design that allows workloads on mainframe, POWER7 and System x servers to share resources and be managed as a single, virtualized system. It's not only the most powerful and energy-efficient mainframe ever, but it could lead to interesting new usage models for consumer PCs. The new systems design combines IBM's new zEnterprise mainframe server with new technology--the... Read more...
Wow, it's actually happening. If you'll recall, reports were flying last year that IBM's supercomputer, a guy by the name of Watson, would one day appear on one of the most famed game shows in the history of television: Jeopardy!. After two years of development and another year of tweaking, Watson is now starring in a Jeopardy! competition video on the world's most famous video viewing portal. What is YouTube? IBM has pit their supercomputers against humans before. Deep Blue has been known to play chess against some of the world's greatest players, but playing a game with a finite number of moves... Read more...
We're sensing a trend here, and Maingear is helping to substantiate our assumptions. Right after NVIDIA announced their new GeForce GTX 470 and 480 GPUs, Maingear has arrived with new high performance gaming PCs that have none other than NVIDIA's Fermi graphics cards in them. Of course, the SHIFT "personal supercomputer" is the first to arrive on the scene, with "a dedicated 3D engine designed from the ground up for DX11 tesselation, 2 times the CUDA cores for raw computing power, a dedicated 3D engine that supports realtime ray tracing for dynamic realism, and enhanced depth of field and image... Read more...
IBM and supercomputers go together like beans and rice (or CPUs and motherboards, for the non-chefs out there), but the company's latest is one of its most impressive to date. Hailed as the most powerful computing system in all of Rhode Island, the multimillion-dollar supercomputer at Brown's Center for Computation and Visualization is a real token of pride for both the institution and IBM as a company. It was built to be used by researchers statewide to tackle "grand challenges" affecting Ocean State residents in climate change, education, energy and health. Both entities will be working with... Read more...
Another one bites the dust, as they say. Though we can only imagine the demand for supercomputers is on the rise as more and more companies, institutions and universities look to crunch massive quantities of data, there's apparently no room for SiCortex. The company, which angled itself as a different kind of supercomputer creator, has reportedly halted operations over the weekend according to an executive at the company. Further details aren't being provided right now, but it's widely assumed that the company simply ran out of cash.Unlike most of its rivals, SiCortex was in the business of making... Read more...
We know it's cliché, but really, what will they think up next? Just last month, researchers at IBM developed a supercomputer that could track some of the oldest English words to ever be uttered, and now another powerful machine will be tasked with taking on some of the quickest minds this planet has to offer... on one of America's most adored game shows.Yep, sometime in the future an IBM machine will be competing with valedictorians and Quiz Bowl champions of yesteryear on Jeopardy! The system, which has been coined 'Watson,' has taken some two years to develop, with the sophisticated Question... Read more...
Who said supercomputers were only good for powering governmental facilities and handling the dirty work for NASA? At the University of Reading in the UK, scientists have been able to utilize an immensely powerful IBM ThamesBlue supercomputer in order to find the oldest words in the English language. According to a release pushed out by IBM on the subject, it took "an average of six weeks to perform a computational task such as comparing two sets of words in different languages," and once its brawny machine stepped in, that time was cut down to "a few hours." Evolutionary language scientists at... Read more...
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