Items tagged with supercomputer

The supercomputer race has only just begun. Japan is currently planning to build the world’s fastest supercomputer. The machine, nicknamed AI Bridging Cloud Infrastructure (ABCI), would ideally be able to process 130 quadrillion calculations per second or 130 petaflops. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has called for scientists, companies, and bureaucrats to work together in order to dominate robotics, renewable energy, and other up and coming industries. The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry will spend 19.5 billion yen ($173 million) on the supercomputer project and should commence in... Read more...
Artificial intelligence is at the center of several evolving and next-generation products and services, everything from video games and smartphones (virtual digital assistants and messaging) to self-driving cars and web searchers. It has the attention of companies small and large, including NVIDIA and Microsoft, the two of which are partnering to push AI technologies more aggressively into the enterprise. What this essentially boils down to is pairing NVIDIA's DGX-1 supercomputer with Microsoft's Azure cloud platform. The idea is to "help companies join the AI revolution" and this partnership means... Read more...
There is one constant in the world of supercomputers: no one is going to be 'fastest' for long. In fact, some supercomputers can seem downright slow after only a couple of years, as hardware continues to become faster and more dense. Take for example Oak Ridge's TITAN supercomputer. Launched in 2013, this supercomputer managed to push about 20 petaFLOPs of throughput (17.59 pFLOPs LINPACK; 27 pFLOPs theoretical). At the time, that was downright mind-blowing. But consider TaihuLight, China's latest supercomputer, coming in at 93 petaFLOPs. For those who don't want to grab a calculator or exercise... Read more...
There’s a new system sitting at the top of the charts of the TOP500 list, which lays out the world’s highest performing supercomputers for all to see. The Sunway TaihuLight Chinese supercomputer has taken over the No. 1 position, achieving an amazing 93 petaflop/s using the LINPACK performance metric. The TaihuLight, which was developed by National Research Center of Parallel Computer Engineering & Technology (NRCPC) and resides at the National Supercomputing Center in Wuxi, is most remarkable for the fact that it's truly a homegrown supercomputer. It uses Chinese-developed ShenWei 26010 (SW26010)... Read more...
The supercomputing segment is set to get a big boost from new silicon announced today at Intel. That silicon is a new version of Xeon Phi, otherwise known as Knight's Landing. Whatever you want to call it, the pre-production chip is a 72-core coprocessor solution manufactured on a 14nm process with 3D Tri-Gate transistors. These aren't CPUs like the kind you drop into your motherboard. They're coprocessors built around Intel's MIC (Many Integrated Core) architecture that, just like it sounds, combines a whole bunch of cores into a single chip, which itself is part of a larger PCI-E add-in card... Read more...
The U.S. isn't a slouch in the supercomputer game, but it's just made it clear that it doesn't just want to be powerful in this arena, but be the leader. In a post made on the official Whitehouse homepage, an Executive Order from President Obama is discussed, which involves plans to unveil a supercomputer in the next decade that hits the much-sought-after performance of 1 exaflop. We've been hearing about exascale computing for a while, so it might seem like we're on the verge of it becoming a reality. But when you consider the sheer amount of performance required to hit that target, it's easy... Read more...
We've heard of benchmarking scandals before, but usually they involve gaming benchmarks and tweaked drivers that run afoul of the rules to gain a competitive advantage. This time, however, it's Chinese search engine Baidu that's in hot water after it was discovered that its supercomputer cheated in a major artificial intelligence competition.Prior to being caught, Dr. Ren Wu, head of the Baidu Heterogeneous Computing team, had boasted that his company was the top dog in computer intelligence. "We have great power in our hands -- much greater than our competitors," Dr. Wu said. The competitors he... Read more...
The cyberwar and war of words between the United States and China is never-ending. When we last visited the tense relationship between the U.S. and China, President Barack Obama was crying foul over draft anti-terrorism legislation that would negatively affect American companies conducting business in China. More to the point, Obama took direct issue with language in the bill that would require American companies operating within China to deliver encryption keys to the Chinese government, install security backdoors, and keep all user data on Chinese soil. "Those kinds of restrictive practices I... Read more...
Watson made a name for itself when IBM paraded the artificially intelligent computer system on Jeopardy and pitted it against the game show's two biggest winners of all-time -- Ken Jennings, who holds the record for the longest winning streak, and Brad Rutter, the all-time money winner. The supercomputer vanquished its human and flesh opponents, but more importantly, it introduced the world to IBM's impressive technology. Oh, and by the way, you can tap into that big brain of Watson's, for a price. IBM announced that Watson Analystics, a breakthrough natural language-based cognitive service that... Read more...
When you're a computer capable of beating some of the world's greatest chess players, why keep all of that knowledge to yourself? That's a question that IBM is posing to its wildly intelligent supercomputer, Watson, and it appears that Watson has an answer. This week, IBM announced that, for the first time, it will make its IBM Watson technology available as a development platform in the cloud, to enable a worldwide community of software application providers to build a new generation of apps infused with Watson's cognitive computing intelligence. Why make such a move? According to IBM, the move... Read more...
A team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), in collaboration with researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have taken a step forward in HIV research by running simulations on the Blue Waters Supercomputer, which is comprised of 32 Cray XK7 supercomputer cabinets and is powered by 3,000 NVIDIA Tesla K20X GPU accelerators. The researchers used computer simulations to uncover the chemical structure of the HIV capsid, which according to the press release both protects a virus’ genetic material and also acts as a sort of virus delivery... Read more...
Desktops may be losing steam as the segment gives way in some part to more mobile machines, but oddly, the largest desktops of all are seeing a huge uptick in attention. Supercomputers far and wide are becoming all the rage at institutions and educational facilities, as the world looks to plow more into science and computational black holes by using giant, always-on computers to handle the dirty work. Today, the Blue Waters supercomputer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign entered production, meaning the behemoth capable of performing quadrillions of calculations every second and... Read more...
The Titan supercomputer buildout at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was a much-publicized upgrade of the older Jaguar supercomputer that already existed on-site. Nvidia and AMD heavily publicized the facility's decision to combine Opteron processors with Nvidia's new K20/K20X-based graphics cards. When it launched the GTX Titan last month, Nvidia told us that one reason it settled on that name was because of the association with the Titan project. That deployment, it turns out, isn't working like it should. Stability problems have kept the supercomputer from passing final stability tests. The system... Read more...
Well... I'm sure this isn't what the designers behind IBM's Watson supercomputer had in mind when it came to human interaction. As it turns out, Watson, as smart as it is, cannot tell the difference between English words that are appropriate, and then not-so-appropriate. You might immediately realize when a word is derogatory - even if you've never heard it before - but no such luck with Watson. It's a mere computer, after all. The discovery of the issue came about when Watson took on the task of memorizing the entirety of UrbanDictionary - the online human-edited slang dictionary. If... Read more...
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