Items tagged with Study

Let's not tread lightly here, we all know how the stereotypical video gamer is portrayed on TV, and perhaps in our own minds sometimes as well -- overweight, anti-social, hyperactive (especially on chat), lazy, living in their parents' basement, and the unflattering list goes on. Just reference the "Make Love, Not Warcraft" episode of South Park to see several of those traits played out. It's amusing (the episode, that is), but are gamers getting a bad rap? Most definitely yes, a new survey reveals. First, let's talk about age and sex (as in gender). According to a study called "The New Face of... Read more...
Unless you're willing to live out the rest of your life as a hermit, you'll notice there's a pecking order wherever you go. This is especially true among teenagers, but what might surprise you is exactly how their social statuses are determined these days. Instead of name brand clothes, which has been the case for many years, a teen's social status is largely determined by food and electronics. No joke! Piper Jaffray told the International Business Times that fashion apparel ruled the day in 2005, but "today it's food." That's a first in 13 years -- where a teen choose to dine out has a bigger... Read more...
It's said a picture is worth 1,000 words, and if that's the case, then what do selfies say? Perhaps quite a bit, actually. For the uninitiated, a "seflie" is the practice of taking your own picture, and these days it's typically done with a mobile device's front-facing camera. You've probably seen teens and adults alike make goofy faces at their cell phone -- they're probably using Snapchat or some equivalent. Selfies are certainly trending in the mobile world, and according to various experts in the field of health, it could be cause for concern. An article in the Guardian Liberty Voice tells... Read more...
A new study further debunks the idea that violent video games turn people into cold blooded killers, or whatever politicians are claiming these days. In an interesting twist, the study does link aggression and hostile behavior to games, but it's not the violent content of a title that gets a gamer's blood boiling, it's the frustration level. Whether it's trying to learn a game's complicated controls or navigating difficult levels, frustration and aggression are common side effects of all types of video games, not just violent ones. Anyone who's ever played Flappy Bird will probably find themselves... Read more...
We're all aware of the dangers of texting and driving -- it's generally not wise to take your eyes off the road when barreling down the freeway encased in a hunk of steel and glass -- but what about texting and walking? There's at least one medical professor out there who believes that walking and text messaging is even more dangerous than distracted driving. According to Dietrich Jehle, professor of emergency medicine at the University of Buffalo, texting and walking is responsible for more injuries per mile than driving and texting. "Pedestrian injuries are particularly dangerous because there's... Read more...
Not everyone needs to be a geek or even particularly tech savvy, though the latter is a trait that will certainly come in handy time and again. We get it, we all have different interests and what not. At the same time, we're a little taken aback by a new survey indicating that around 1 in 10 Americans (11 percent) think HTML is an STD. Like syphilis. In case anyone reading this is among the 11 percent, HTML is not a sexually transmitted disease. HTML (HyperText Markup Language) is a programming language used to make websites, and while it can incite anger, rage, and frustration (just like any programming... Read more...
As any mobile user can attest, there are no shortages of free games to download from the various app market places, though many of them try to attach their tentacles to your wallet or purse through in-game purchases (some are worse about it than others). These can range from weapon and armor upgrades, to gems that can be exchanged for more play time, or anything else. If a game is a hit, these in-game purchases become cash cows for the developer, but you might be surprised where the bulk of those dollars are coming from. According to Swrve, makers of an in-app marketing platform for mobile, just... Read more...
A lot can change in three years. In 2011, Google launched its own social network, Ultrabooks became a thing, Steve Ballmer was the head of Microsoft for the foreseeable future, and it looked like we'd all own a glasses-free 3D TV someday soon. That's really just a sampling of how the landscape has changed in three short years, but it begs the question, what major events are in store for 2017? Try the death of Facebook. A couple of graduate students at Princeton University published a paper claiming Facebook will lose around 80 percent of its active membership by 2017, which would virtually destroy... Read more...
It's rather annoying having to sidestep a fellow pedestrian on the sidewalk who's paying more attention to his mobile phone than his surroundings, but not only is such behavior selfishly rude, it's scientifically observed to be dangerous, too. A new study points out all kinds of flaws with trying to text message and strut at the same time. Researchers at Australia's University of Queensland used motion capture technology similar to that employed by movie studios to observe walking patterns. Test subjects wore reflective markers on the back of their heads using a head-band, as well as their back,... Read more...
Listen up kids, are your parents giving you grief about wanting to stay inside and play video games rather than venture outside in the cold weather and risk pneumonia? We've all been there, except the games 'back-in-the-day' were far less advanced and graphically polished as they are today, but that's a topic for another story. The point we're trying to pass on is that playing games has been scientifically proven to increase brain power, adding to the list of studies that suggest they're good for you. Sounds too good to be true, right? Well, this isn't a free pass to lock yourself inside during... Read more...
The typical smartphone contains a wealth of information, including contacts, photos, text messages, and more. They also serve as portals to cloud services, so you can imagine how stressful it would be to misplace one of these devices. Plus, they're expensive to replace. Be that as it may, security outfit Avast claims consumers living in the United States are the most likely to lose a smartphone. That little tidbit is based on a survey of 167,904 customers worldwide. After figuring what which nation is the most careless with their digital devices, Avast then set out to see who is affected most by... Read more...
It's easy for the majority of American adults ages 18 and older to take broadband access for granted because most adults have it at home. Not all, however, as 3 out of 10 are still without broadband at their place of residence, according to a new study by Pew Research Center. Furthermore, 2 out of 10 American adults lack both a home broadband connection and a smartphone. "The demographic factors most correlated with home broadband adoption continue to be educational attainment, age, and household income," Pew Research Center noted in its report. "Almost 9 in 10 college graduates have high-speed... Read more...
It doesn't matter if you're a saint or a frequent sinner, a sailor with a potty mouth or a monk who took a vow of silence. If you own a computer, then at some point you've belted out a line of obscenities that would make Andrew Dice Clay wince in astonishment. PCs have a way of bringing out the worst in us when things go wrong, and according to a recent nationwide survey conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of Crucial in June 2013, some even tend to get physical. Out of over 2,000 U.S. adults ages 18 and older who were surveyed, more than a third -- 36 percent -- of Americans who experienced... Read more...
No place is off limits when it comes to using to smartphones. That's one of the takeaways of a new study released and conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of Jumio, in which it was revealed that Americans who own such devices have no problem using them during sex (9 percent), in the shower (12 percent), and while at church (19 percent). Perhaps Samsung can use this information to better promote its Galaxy S4 Active. Regardless of the type of mobile phone, Americans want them by their side at all times possible. Nearly three-quarters of the 1,102 survey's respondents said they're within five... Read more...
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