Items tagged with SEC

RadioShack is fast approaching a major hurdle in its long-running turnaround effort: it’s woefully short on cash. The company has been fighting declining sales with strategies that have left critics scratching their heads and was warned by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in July that its stock price was putting the company in danger of being delisted.  In a public release today, RadioShack sounded the alarm: while it believes sales are trending up, it needs more cash for its long-term plans. RadioShack is working to turn itself around but needs cash. At least one analyst... Read more...
If you picture an HP executive as a straight-laced person in a conservative suit, it’s time to shake up that image, because three HP subsidiaries--in Russia, Poland, and Mexico--have spent years bribing government officials in those respective countries to snag lucrative contracts. "Hewlett-Packard subsidiaries created a slush fund for bribe payments...employed two sets of books to track bribe recipients, and used anonymous email accounts and prepaid mobile telephones to arrange covert meetings to hand over bags of cash," said Deputy Assistant Attorney General Bruce Swartz in a statement.... Read more...
It's been 10 years since Microsoft and Nvidia colaborated on a console development project, but a clause in the agreement between the two companies could still have ramifications for the GPU manufacturer. The company's recent FY 2011 report with the SEC states: On March 5, 2000, we entered into an agreement with Microsoft in which we agreed to develop and sell graphics chips and to license certain technology to Microsoft and its licensees for use in the Xbox. Under the agreement, if an individual or corporation makes an offer to purchase shares equal to or greater than 30% of the outstanding... Read more...
The collapse of Wall Street a few years back and the so-called Great Recession that followed were, it's generally agreed, pretty bad things. As investment banks began to fail and the Dow fell, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) found itself in the uncomfortable position of having to explain how this had happened on its watch. It seems logical to think the top brass at the federal watchdog would have spent their time furiously searching for an explanation as to what had happened, while simultaneously trying to explain how they missed it. As it turns out, that's not quite true. The SEC... Read more...
Malware writers sobbed Tuesday as Microsoft announced that it will cease sales of its security product, Windows Live OneCare, as of June 30th, 2009. Instead, Microsoft announced that it would begin shipping a free product, codenamed "Morro," in the second half of 2009. The new offering will be less of a resource hog, according to the press release, which would obviously enable Microsoft to protect PCs in developing nations more effectively. In other words, they want to make sure they have some sort of product covering all the security holes in their OSes. But seriously, let's face it, the product... Read more...
The enterprising lads over at iFixit sure like to take stuff apart. Then again, that's at the heart of their bread-and-butter--they take the risks with potentially broken parts and lost screws so that they can assemble comprehensive DIY guides for instructing you how you can repair your own Apple products, such as MacBooks and iPods. If you don't know how to take it apart, how are you going to know to put it back together?Their latest disassembly was of the new "unibody" MacBook Pro that was unveiled only two days ago.  Here are some highlight of what they discovered during their dissection:  The... Read more...
Traditional antivirus (AV) testing, such as that done by organizations such as AV-test.org and AV-comparatives.org, uses collections of malware to demonstrate the capabilities of security products. Secunia, on the other hand, focuses on exploits. For example, it has a scanner at its site that will search your system for unpatched vulnerabilities in products such as Microsoft Windows, Internet Explorer, or Firefox. As Secunia's focus is on exploits, you might expect them to try to put AV solutjions to the test with exploits, rather than just already published malware, and that's what they did. They... Read more...
Data breaches are becoming increasingly common and more sophisticated, putting consumers' personal information and financials at risk. Not only can these data breaches lead to identity theft, but some can even lead to money being siphoned out of bank accounts and illegal purchases made on credit cards. The responsibility for preventing these breaches falls on many shoulders, including merchants, consumers, and even Internet service providers (ISPs). Once such ISP, Verizon, recently analyzed "four years of data from over 500 cases worked by the Verizon Business Investigative Response team," to produce... Read more...
WD SHIPS SECOND-GENERATION GREEN HARD DRIVES WITH SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVED POWER EFFICIENCY AND PERFORMANCE WD’s Best Selling Eco-friendly WD Caviar Green Drive Continues to be the Most Power-Efficient, Coolest and Quietest 3.5-inch Hard Drive in the Market LAKE FOREST, Calif. - Oct. 1, 2008 - WD (NYSE: WDC) today announced the second-generation of its highly popular and environmentally friendly WD Caviar Green desktop hard drives, which feature the company’s GreenPower technology to significantly reduce power consumption, compared with standard hard drives. The new platform is based on... Read more...
It's one thing to see, say, banking information to show up on a hard drive on eBay.  But to see top secret information show up on a digital camera (likely on an SD card) sold on eBay, that's a whole 'nother ball of wax.According to The Sun, an unsuspecting 28-year-old Brit spent a pretty reasonable $31 for a Nikon Coolpix camera, and got waaaaaay more than he bargained for.  Not only did he get some top secret info, after he reported it to the police, he got a visit from Special Branch.Among the items on the camera --- which he noticed after he downloaded the pictures from a vacation... Read more...
The security vulnerabilities already discovered in Chrome appear to have been patched by Google. Of course, Google (much like Apple) hasn't provided any release notes, so discovering what's been fixed isn't that easy. Google said, in a group post: We're planning to do release notes. 149.29 is a security update and we released it as fast as we could. We would've liked more time to prepare things, but some of the vulnerabilities were made public without giving us a chance to respond, update, and protect our users first. Thanks for being patient as we work out the kinks in all of our processes, Mark... Read more...
Not satisfied with Firefox 3.0.1?  Want to see if Firefox 3.1 is really faster than Chrome, as Mozilla claims (though it's arguable)?  Well, last night Mozille released the second alpha for Firefox 3.1.  Note the word "alpha.:"  Beta is buggy enough, but Alpha starts to stretch the limits a little.Shiretoko Alpha 2 is an early developer milestone for the next version of Firefox that is being built on top of Mozilla's Gecko 1.9.1 layout engine, Shiretoko Alpha 2 is being made available for testing purposes only, and is intended for web application developers and our testing community.... Read more...
If you use a computer on a regular basis, chances are you are running some sort of anti-malware application. If you aren't then you really should be, as recent studies show that malware is becoming more pervasive and more sophisticated. No operating system (OS) is immune from malware attacks, but Microsoft Windows is the most frequently targeted OS. In an effort to help guide Windows users as to what are the better anti-malware options available, AV-Test just released performance results from 34 of the most recently-available versions of security suites--including a number of 2009 and beta versions... Read more...
Apparently, Linux kernel creator, Linus Torvalds has no problem expressing his opinion, and did so vehemently via back-and-forth e-mails with the editors of Network World this week. What got Torvalds so heated is his perception of how security vulnerabilities are so incredibly over-hyped to the extent that he calls it a "security circus." What started this whole tirade, was a post Torvalds made to the Linux kernel developer newsgroup four weeks ago where he lobbed his opinions of how the "security circus... glorifies and... encourages the wrong behavior," and where he saved his cruelest and most... Read more...
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