Items tagged with Sceptre

Well, well, here comes Sceptre yet again to do battle with the big outfits like Vizio, Samsung, Sony and LG. The company has just released a swivel capable 42-inch LCD HDTV in a stylish glossy finish, and it has a 1080p panel, curved front frame and a rapid 5 ms response time to handle fast-action content. There's also a SPDIF digital audio output, an all in one ATSC/NTSC/QAM tuner and 3 HDMI ports for added functionality. If you aren't up to speed with HDMI, a VGA port is also around back. Other specifications include a 4000:1 contrast ratio, Energy Star 3.0 label, a headphone jack and 10Wx2 speaker... Read more...
Sceptre may not have a prescence like Sony, Vizio or Samsung, but if you need a new HDTV for your bedroom or office, they definitely have an option to think about. The company has just revealed a new 37" 1080p HDTV, with a glossy black bezel, a rounded stand, silver trim and a 6.5ms response time. Of course, the panel has a native 1080p resolution, and it can swivel up to 30 degrees. It has a unique Equalizer setting for users to adjust and control the tone/volume of the audio, as well as three HDMI ports, a 4000:1 contrast ratio, a built-in USB port, 10-watt x 2 speakers, a SPDIF digital audio... Read more...
Here's a name you haven't heard in awhile: Sceptre. The company has been making LCDs, TVs and other monitors for years now, but it has definitely been awhile since it was able to product something to take on the offerings out now from Dell, Samsung, Sharp and the rest of the gang. Making a play for business in the "my current LCD is too tiny" sector, Sceptre has introduced a new 27" high-def LCD monitor with a 60,000:1 contrast ratio and an ultra-fast 2ms response time.The display has a Full HD (1080p, or 1920x1080) resolution, along with an Energy Star 5.0 certification, 400cd/m2 brightness, 50000... Read more...
When LCD screens were first introduced they were plagued by many problems, but they also had some advantages over CRT monitors. LCD's were lighter, thinner, and used less power.  And so they caught on and the technology incrementally improved. Early generations were limited to lower resolutions, tight viewing angles, really slow response times, and they carried a hefty price tag. The screen size was also limited because of the early production technology. The main market for them at that point was laptop screens, as the LCD technology offered exactly what was needed in that space. Later on... Read more...