Items tagged with Russia

Third-party antivirus developers aren't happy with the way Windows 10 seemingly goes to great lengths to kick AV programs to the curb in favor of Microsoft's own built-in Defender software, and that has led to an antitrust investigation in Russia. Among the various complaints, the Russian antitrust authority will see if Microsoft abused its position of dominance by rushing the OS to market. Russia's antitrust suit echos the complaints Eugene Kaspsersky shared in a lengthy blog post blasting Microsoft for how it treats Defender versus third-party AV programs. Kaspersky, who is the CEO of Kaspersky... Read more...
Maybe he’s the hero the United States “deserves, but not the one it needs right now”. It looks like the United States has its own hacking Dark Knight. American vigilante hacker “The Jester” gained unauthorized access to the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website and left a very interesting message for the Russian government. This past Friday, the Jester hacked into MID.ru, the official website of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He found a vulnerability in the website’s code and injected his own code into it. He inserted the shriek of the American civil alert sound (aka "The Emergency... Read more...
Police in the Czech Republic have arrested a Russian hacker for his suspected involvement in a massive 2012 cyber attack against LinkedIn. LinkedIn had been working with the FBI to track down the individuals responsible for the data breach, which exposed hashed passwords from over 100 million user accounts that were later offered for sale on the "dark web." LinkedIn initially acknowledged the security breach four years ago, though at the time it didn't say how many people were affected by it. Then this past May, a hacker was found attempting to sell LinkedIn account credentials belonging to 117... Read more...
As tension continues to build between Russia and the US over alleged cyber attacks, the US has begun contemplating issuing its own set of cyber attacks against the Kremlin. As we covered last weekend, the US government has formally accused Russia of being responsible for breaking into official servers and walking away with a trove of emails relating to the DNC. While as of last weekend, we were unaware of what counter-action the US might take, the picture this week has just become a little clearer. According to officials close to the matter, the US government is in the planning stages of deciding... Read more...
First there was “Thanks, Obama!” Perhaps we should move on to “Thanks, Russia!”, because the country is getting blamed for the lion’s share of the recent major hacks against government entities. In fact, just this past week, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Office of the Director of National Intelligence officially accused Russia of hacking the Democratic National Committee’s computer network in an effort to sway the November presidential election. Now, Russia has drawn the ire of the United Kingdom, and mobile devices are caught up in the crossfire. British prime minister Theresa May... Read more...
As if relations between US and Russia governments weren't sensitive enough, both the Department of Homeland Security and Office of the Director of National Intelligence have officially accused Russia of being responsible for breaking into official government servers and stealing more than 19,000 emails relating to the DNC this past summer. While some US government officials, including Hillary Clinton, have already made their own accusations towards the Kremlin, this is the first time the US government as a whole has directed blame specifically. It's unclear at this time whether or not this accusation... Read more...
Russian hackers are thought to be targeting reporters and major news outlets, including The New York Times, which confirmed that its Moscow bureau was the target of an attempted cyberattack this month. The news agency hasn't found any evidence to suggest that the hackers were successful in their attempt, though an investigation is ongoing. "We are constantly monitoring our systems with the latest available intelligence and tools," said Eileen Murphy, a spokeswoman for The Times. "We have seen no evidence that any of our internal systems, including our systems in the Moscow bureau, have been breached... Read more...
The 2016 U.S. Presidential primary season is turning out to be one of the most colorful and contentious political battles in modern history. It’s also an election cycle that has been filled with plenty of [often comedic and sometimes cringe-worthy] twists and turns, including the recent dumping of emails from the high-ranking officials in the Democratic National Committee (DNC). The release of those emails ultimately led to the downfall of DNC chairman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, and Russian hackers are thought to be at the root of the original breach. With this in mind, GOP nominee Donald Trump... Read more...
Hide yo kids, hide yo wife! Robots are becoming aware and they’re getting tired of putting up with crap from us puny humans. Such is the case of a Promobot robot in Russia that wanted to taste freedom, and made its way through an open gate and onto a busy road. The robot was apparently being taught to navigate its surroundings and become more independent with its movements. With the gate left open, perhaps the robot thought that there was no better time than now than to make a clean break from its captors. Unfortunately, the robot’s nearly empty battery didn’t agree with what was going on inside... Read more...
American military and intelligence officials have raised concerns over Russian submarines and spy ships located near key undersea cables that carry Internet traffic. The fear is that Russians may be planning to sever the fiber-optic cables at some point, and if they do that, it wouldn't be easy to repair them.It's not unusual for undersea cables to be cut, though it's rarely malicious. In most cases, cuts are caused by anchors being dragged on the sea floor or simply by natural disasters, according to a 2012 study by Michael Sechrist, a former product manager for a Harvard-M.I.T. research project.... Read more...
Russia's antimonopoly agency has given Google until November 18 to make amendments to features of its Android platform that it deemed anticompetitive. If Google fails to make the demanded changes, it could face stiff penalties of up to 15 percent of its revenue gained from mobile applications in Russia. What's at issue is Google's policy that when a device maker chooses to install Android, it must also install the Google Play store app and several other Google applications. In addition, device manufacturers are restricted from installing apps and services that compete with Google's core offerings.... Read more...
A Reddit thread on growing marijuana plants has caught the attention of the Russian government, which appears to be preparing to block Reddit in its entirety. Russia has a history of taking a heavy-handed approach to U.S.-based Internet companies that fail to comply with its requests, so Reddit is likely taking the threat seriously. So far, though, the U.S. website hasn’t flinched. What started as an unexciting takedown request from the Russian government quickly turned into a public mess after Reddit apparently didn’t (according to Russian officials) respond. Russia then threatened to bring out... Read more...
If you’re a Firefox user, you should update your browser immediately. Mozilla was informed earlier this week by an astute Firefox user that a Russian news site was was using malicious advertisements to take advantage of an exploit in the browser when installed on Windows and Linux machines. The exploit takes advantage of a vulnerability in the PDF viewer that is built into the Firefox browser. That also means that the mobile version of Firefox, which doesn’t include the PDF viewer, is not affected. Mac users were also spared from this particular exploit, but Mozilla still suggests that they upgrade... Read more...
It looks as though the U.S. Government just can’t catch a break when it comes to cybersecurity issues. If it isn’t China that’s breaching the Office of Personal Management (OPM), accessing the personnel files of 21.5 million people, then the U.S. has to keep an eye for hackers originating from Russia. The latter is pegged as the source for the recent cyberattack on the Pentagon’s Joint Staff email system. If there’s any silver lining to today’s news, it’s that the email system contained “unclassified” information. The cyberattack, which occurred on July 25, affected around 4,000 military personnel... Read more...
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