Items tagged with Pentium

It might "just" be a Pentium, but I consider the G3258 "Anniversary Edition" to be one of the most interesting chips Intel's released in a while. It's a well-known fact that enthusiasts love ekeing as much performance out of their parts as possible, and there's just something about doing that to a sub-$100 part that can be seriously exciting. It's like buying a modest car and turning it into one that "wows" people. While the G3258 has overclockers right in its sights, that doesn't mean that those who don't like manual overclocking can't benefit. For them, GIGABYTE's updated EasyTune, now shipping... Read more...
Last year, Intel launched two new processor cores -- the Core i7-4770K, based on the Haswell core, and the Ivy Bridge-based Core i7-4960X. Both chips were incremental updates over their predecessors; Haswell may have delivered impressive gains in mobile, but it failed to impress on the desktop where it was only slightly faster than the chip it replaced. Enthusiasts weren't terribly excited about either core, but Intel is hoping its new Devil's Canyon CPU, which launches today, will change that. The new chip is the Core i7-4790K and it packs several new features that should appeal to the enthusiast... Read more...
Intel used the backdrop of the Game Developers Conference currently taking place in San Francisco to make a handful of interesting announcements that run the gamut from low-power technologies to ultra-high-end desktop chips. In addition to outing a number of upcoming processors—from an Anniversary Edition Pentium to a monster 8-core Haswell-E—Intel also announced a new technology dubbed Ready Mode. Intel described Ready Mode as a “capability that takes advantage of new power-saving states in Intel’s 4th gen Core desktop processor, combined with software and board level optimizations,... Read more...
Nvidia isn't happy with what it sees as the free pass Intel's upcoming Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture has gotten on the software front, and it's taken to the blogosphere to challenge it. The post begins with a lengthy discussion of what Nvidia is calling its "hybrid architecture," in which a CPU and GPU get together for great fun and massive execution of properly distributed workloads. The post is conveniently timed to land just before the Texas Advanced Computing Center's (TACC) joint symposium with Intel on highly parallel computing, which kicks off next week. What Nvidia takes issue... Read more...
Intel's presentations at the International Solid State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) this year are focused on one of the biggest problems facing modern CPU designers—how to improve power efficiency without sacrificing compute performance. Intel isn't just tackling this problem through conventional process shrinks and smaller dies, however; the company detailed multiple new approaches. First up is Claremont, Intel's first chip built to run on Near Threshold Voltage (NTV) technology. The term "Near Threshold Voltage" refers to the amount of voltage required to switch a transistor from 0 to 1.... Read more...
Intel's marketing division has a long history of partnering with OEMs in order to jointly promote a product, but the company's most recent initiative could create blowback from unhappy customers. According to information unearthed this past weekend, Intel is quietly testing the concept of "upgradeable" CPUs. Instead of buying a physical CPU and going to through the hassle of installing it, customers who purchase one of these systems could optionally purchase an upgrade card (current price: $50). Right now the program appears to be confined to Best Buy and a single Gateway, the SX2841-09e. There's... Read more...
AMD announced its second-quarter earnings yesterday and the company's results, while not perfect, imply continued strong execution. The company's revenue was up 40 percent year-on-year on strong demand for server and mobile parts. Total revenue was $1.65B, up five percent from the first quarter. "Robust demand for our latest mobile platforms and solid execution drove record second quarter revenue and a healthy gross margin," said Dirk Meyer, AMD President and CEO. "Our unmatched combination of microprocessor and graphics capabilities resulted in customers launching a record number of new mobile... Read more...
Let’s go back ten years in time. Ten years ago, in 1997, Intel’s Pentium 2 processor was launched and was a big hit since it was so “fast” at the time, ranging from speeds of about 200 MHz all the way up to 400 some-odd MHz. Of course we have come a long way, and our computers have evolved into much more powerful and compact machines. Nonetheless there’s a new computer that gives us a measure of just how far we’ve actually come. Picture a fully functional computer that measures 2 inches cubed (about 5cm cubed). Yes, it’s approximately the size of a small rubik’s cube, and is over 500 times smaller... Read more...
If you thought the Pentium name was dead, think again. We've just posted a new article here at HotHardware in which we evaluate the performance, power consumption, and overclockability of Intel's brand-new Pentium E2140 dual-core processor. This chip is a derivative of the 'Conroe' core used in the Core 2 Duo family of processors, but with a smaller cache and lower FSB and core frequencies.  At under $100, it proved to be a solid value, especially after we overclocked it to almost 3GHz using the stock air-cooler. Click the link below and check it out...Intel Pentium E2140 Processor... Read more...
Intel has spent millions making their "Core" brand synonymous with high performance processing. In these days of the Core Duo, Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad, and Core 2 Extreme, it’s pretty easy to find a Core microarchitecture-based processor to match nearly any possible price point. The performance levels of the Core 2 product lineup have been so dominating that Intel really didn’t have to spend a penny if they didn’t want to, although big time marketing campaigns are good for converting those who just want the latest and greatest and don’t necessarily read enthusiast sites like ours here. Despite... Read more...
According to HKEPC, and one of their Taiwanese inside-sources, Intel plans to launch new Celeron and Pentium processors in June based on the Core microarchitecture. These new processors would differ from the Core 2 Duo in their cache sizes and bus speeds, but would still offer significant performance improvements over current Netburst-based Pentiums and Celerons. "We have been told by our source from Taiwan manufacturer that Intel would officially release Pentium E and Celeron 400 product lines on June 3. At that time of release, Core micro-architecture will then cover all range of desktop processor... Read more...
There's an interesting article posted over at MadShrimps this morning. The crew took a couple of Intel Mobile processors -- the Core Duo and Pentium M -- and tested them "shoot-out" style in a desktop platform.  If you're not familiar with Intel's mobile processors, you're going to be surprised by their performance. "The Pentium Mobile line of processors have become quite popular with hardware enthusiasts as they offer a better performance per Mhz than their desktop companions. We compare Intel's Core Duo... Read more...
If you've been shopping for a processor, you may have noticed that Intel silently launched a new Pentium D CPU recently, the dual-core 3.6GHz Pentium D 960. The gang at HardwareZone plucked one fresh from the assembly line and have posted their thoughts about its performance and value.  Not a bad chip -- it's almost a shame Conroe is right around the corner. "Quite frankly, we thought the Pentium 965 Extreme Edition from Intel was the last attempt at rivaling AMD with their existing Presler based CPUs. While we are still right that... Read more...
The HardwareZone has taken a look at Intel's current flagship Pentium Extreme Edition 955 and 965 processors. We evaluated both of these CPUs a while back as well.  You can see our take on the 955 here, and the 965 here. "Succeeding their lackluster predecessors, the new Pentium XE processors based on the Presler core sport some serious specs. With clock speeds of up to 3.73GHz, loaded with 4MB of L2 cache and taking advantage of a 1066MHz FSB, they seem to instill fear into AMD's A64 FX series; but are they that extreme?"... Read more...
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