Items tagged with Password

The parade of banks, insurance companies and retailers that have suffered data breaches has caused many people to store their passwords with sites like LastPass. The security company creates a unique password for each of the user’s logins and provides access to those passwords via a single, master password.Now, LastPass is admitting that at least some of its data has been comprised. The company believes that its customers are not vulnerable, but it concedes that email addresses and authentication hashes are among the data affected. Password reminders and server per user salts were also comprised.... Read more...
At this point, the resetting of a mobile phone to a from-the-factory state is something we have all done, perhaps simply to get a fresh start with a device that has become sluggish and over-burdened with years of downloaded flotsam. But more likely, we do it for the purpose of selling the phone or passing it along to a friend or family member. We rely on such a reset to completely wipe the phone of any trace of our having used it, all settings and sensitive data. The results of a study performed in the UK by University of Cambridge researchers entitled Security Analysis of Android... Read more...
The chip business has been good to Intel, but it's not the only product in the Santa Clara semiconductor firm’s portfolio. Among other things, Intel is also entrenched in the security market. The company spent billions of dollars acquiring McAfee several years ago and this week scooped up PasswordBox, a relative newcomer to the security scene that makes a self-titled password manager somewhat similar to LastPass. PasswordBox launched to the public only 18 months ago and during that time has grown from a skeleton crew of just eight full-time employees to a modest workforce of 44 individuals today.... Read more...
Here's something you're probably aware of: privacy is a major issue, and it's becoming bigger by the day. Just this week, Kickstarter's servers were infiltrated, just months after Target suffered one of the world's most serious data exploits. Companies are flowing out of the blue with a myriad methods to solve all of this and to keep your data buttoned up. SlickLogin was one of those companies, and going forward, it'll be housed under the Google umbrella. The premise of SlickLogin is actually pretty slick, as the title implies: users looking to login to a site on their PC would have their PC emit... Read more...
If you’ve been avoiding signing up for Google’s two-token authentication system because you thought the inconvenience outweighed the extra security for your Google account, you’re probably feeling pretty smug about now. An update today for the Google Authenticator iPhone app wiped out user data for two-token authentication, prompting some angst on Twitter. Google quickly pulled the app from the iTunes so it can fix the issue without it affecting additional users.  Because the app can be used to provide security for other online services, some users who installed the update... Read more...
Security is a hot topic these days, and with breaches happening left and right, we certainly get it. For consumers, things can usually boil down to implementing two-factor authentication. But what about enterprises? Zoho has just launched Zoho Vault, an online password manager for businesses far and wide. Zoho Vault establishes a central repository that offers unmatched security and complete data privacy for companies that want to store, organize, manage and safely share their passwords, online credentials, financial records and other sensitive information. The Zoho Vault iPhone app lets users... Read more...
Imagine a world without passwords. Scary, right? There's no doubt that passwords are an integral part of computing, because they allow us the easiest form of security when accessing our online accounts. But, as has been evidenced time and time again, passwords are far from bulletproof, especially if you generally don't care about them or get lazy about them. Anytime a password database gets leaked, check out how many of them are the same - as hard as it is to believe, some people still use "password" as a password. On the opposite end of the spectrum, you might have complex passwords - as... Read more...
If there's one thing that goes hand-in-hand with technology, it's security flaws. Rarely, though, are such flaws actual features, such as one Apple just had to rush to patch up. Late last week, the company rolled-out two-step verification, where a pin code sent to your mobile phone could be used in conjunction with a regular password to amp-up the level of security on your account. This is a great move, and one that I'd like to see more companies adopt. However, with this new feature came a ridiculous oversight. If you knew someone who had an Apple account, and also happened to know their e-mail... Read more...
Another day, another security breach. This time it’s Evernote, the popular cloud-based “remember everything” service whose product offerings have increased substantially recently to include business-oriented tools. According to a post on Evernote’s website, the company spotted some suspicious activity: “Evernote's Operations & Security team has discovered and blocked suspicious activity on the Evernote network that appears to have been a coordinated attempt to access secure areas of the Evernote Service.” Because of the breach, the company recommends that... Read more...
Companies that aren't extra careful with their social media accounts can end up with egg on their faces, and sometimes it just boils down to having a strong enough password. This is a point Twitter wants to drive home with its users following a couple of high profile hacker attacks on Burger King, which was hijacked and overrun with McDonalds content, and Chrysler, which saw its Jeep Twitter feed hacked by prankster who posted the brand had been sold to Cadillac. Maybe Burger King's password was Whopper123 and maybe it wasn't, but either way, Twitter felt now was a good time to talk about password... Read more...
There sure has been a lot of hacking going on in recent weeks. Even major news outlets like The New York Times have joined the U.S. government in suspecting the Chinese military of attempting to solicit digital information, and this week, Facebook announced that it too has been the target of an attack. In a post erected to the company's Security portal, it confessed that while it invests heavily in protecting users and proactively preventing such attacks, one managed to slip by last month. In Jan. 2013, Facebook Security noticed that its systems had been targeted in a sophisticated attack. Reportedly,... Read more...
Concerned that hacking is on the rise? You've every right to be worried. Following recent reports from The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times surrounding intrusion from outside forces into their news systems and e-mail databases, Twitter has now affirmed a security puncture of its own. The company released a blog post noting that it "detected unusual access patterns that led to us identifying unauthorized access attempts to Twitter user data." In that discovery process, Twitter found one live attack and neutralized it, but some damage was already done. The investigation has thus far indicated... Read more...
If you woke up to find that your Twitter password wasn’t working, you’re not alone. Twitter accidentally reset the passwords for many of its users yesterday. If your account is one of those affected by the mass reset, you should have received an email alerting you to the situation and giving you an opportunity to change your password back to your dog’s birthday.   Twitter CEO Dick Costolo. Twitter was hunting for accounts that have been hijacked for nefarious purposes. It reset the passwords on those accounts – and then some. Twitter accidentally reset plenty... Read more...
Social networking site LinkedIn reportedly faces a $5 million class action lawsuit over a recent security breach that compromised the passwords of millions of members. The suit was filed by Katie Szpyrka in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of California. Szpyrka says LinkedIn "failed to properly safeguard its users' digitally stored personally identifiable information, including email addresses, passwords, and login credentials," ZDNet reports. As a result, she wants LinkedIn to cough up $5 million in damages, which works out to less than a dollar for each of the 6.46 million passwords... Read more...
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