Items tagged with Netflix

In case you hadn’t noticed, ISPs and Netflix aren’t exactly friendly right now. In addition to bowing to Comcast and paying extra fees (that surely stuck in Netflix’s craw), the video streaming provider passive-aggressively accused Verizon of delivering substandard network performance, and Verizon countered by blasting Netflix for what amounts to lying (allegedly). The situation is only going to get worse and uglier, and the FCC is stepping in to investigate what’s boiling under the surface. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler “Consumers must get what they pay for,” wrote... Read more...
Netflix and Verizon are in a bit of a spat at present. The issue is that some Netflix users on Verizon networks started seeing an error message when experiencing a laggy connection that said “The Verizon network is crowded right now” followed by a note that said Netflix was “Adjusting video for smoother playback”. It certainly seemed to be a direct shot at Verizon by Netflix, and the former was (predictably) none too pleased. In addition to a scathing blog post penned by Verizon’s David Young--”This claim [of the Verizon network being the cause of lag] is not... Read more...
Is the FCC trolling ISPs (on our behalf)? The agency is considering raising the standard minimum speed for what is considered “high-speed Internet”, which would potentially force ISPs to work faster to roll out better service to more areas. Currently, broadband Internet speed is defined as 4Mbps, but according to an anonymous FCC official that spoke to the Washington Post, the FCC might bump that number up to 10Mbps or even 25Mbps. 4Mbps is nothing; you can’t even stream Netflix in HD at that speed, and forget about having a second user gobbling up bandwidth. The new definitions... Read more...
The ability to stream movies and other content to your TV is relatively commonplace thanks to set top boxes such as the Roku 3, Apple TV, gaming consoles that support streaming, and built-in functionality that comes with many of today’s Blu-ray players and TVs. Even so, there’s always room for additional competition, right? Amazon believes there is, and recently launched its Fire TV to prove it. Amazon Fire TV provides access to a number of popular services including Netflix, Prime Instant Video, Hulu Plus, WatchESPN, Showtime Anytime, Pandora, tunein, YouTube, Vimeo, Crackle, and much... Read more...
The ability to stream movies and other content to your TV is relatively commonplace thanks to set top boxes such as the Roku 3, Apple TV, gaming consoles that support streaming, and built-in functionality that comes with many of today’s Blu-ray players and TVs. Even so, there’s always room for additional competition, right? Amazon believes there is, and recently launched its Fire TV to prove it. Amazon Fire TV provides access to a number of popular services including Netflix, Prime Instant Video, Hulu Plus, WatchESPN, Showtime Anytime, Pandora, tunein, YouTube, Vimeo, Crackle, and much... Read more...
If there was any doubt about Netflix’s huge popularity in North America, consider that according to a new report from Sandvine, the streaming video service accounts for more than one-third of all Internet traffic. Netflix was responsible for 31.6% of traffic, but with a bump to Super HD (4K) content for users, it’s already boosted that number to 34.2%. Perhaps of even greater significance is the fact that “cord cutter” types who rely on services like Netflix as opposed to traditional pay TV are responsible for a whopping 54% of all monthly network traffic. These folks consume... Read more...
The number of connected devices offering access to streaming services like Netflix and Hulu continues to grow. Heck, don't be surprised if the capability is baked into the next smart toothbrush you buy. What most of these devices have in common is they typically don't sit behind a paywall, though that isn't true of Microsoft's Xbox 360 and Xbox One consoles, both of which require an Xbox Live Gold subscription to access streaming media apps. Well, that's reportedly about to change. Citing "multiple sources within Microsoft [who] have been briefed" on the matter, ArsTechnica says an upcoming change... Read more...
This morning Netflix confirmed that it will be raising its rates for monthly streaming subscribers to $8.99 per month, which is a $1 increase over the current price. However, current customers can keep the old rate in place for two years if they don’t change their plan. Netflix said it was upping rates “in order to continue adding more movies and TV shows” and extended the two-year grace period to current Netflix users as a thank you. According to multiple reports, the $1 increase is in effect in Canada and the UK, too. Surely some users will be upset by the rate hike, but they... Read more...
Netflix is staying ahead of the curve by offering a small amount of content in 4K, readying a near future where the streaming TV and movies service can take advantage of the slew of Ultra HD 4K TVs that will be hitting the market from the likes of Samsung, Sony, LG, and Vizio. “Breaking Bad” is one program that Netflix said would be available in 4K, and now the company has confirmed that indeed, the series will be streaming in 4K as of June. The second season of Netflix’s own “House of Cards” as well as several Louie Schwarztberg nature films are already available... Read more...
The future of television is upon us. With pay-TV transforming, slowly but surely, service providers have little choice but to come to grips with the realities surrounding their business. More and more individuals are growing up on a steady entertainment diet of Netflix and YouTube, and once they grab jobs and own homes, they aren't as likely to pull the trigger on cable as their parents were. Now, a handful of smaller pay-TV companies are planning to bake Netflix into their offerings, and it could trigger a domino effect that'll sweep across the industry. Atlantic Broadband, Grande Communications... Read more...
The FCC has confirmed that it will hold a May 15 vote on a new set of policies governing net neutrality and ISP behavior -- but according to the Wall Street Journal, the commission's proposed regulation will effectively kill the idea of a level playing field. The Wall Street Journal reports that the proposed rules would prevent ISPs from blocking specific websites, but would allow them to charge services like Netflix an additional fee for better access to end users. The paper claims that all "commercially reasonable" agreements would be permitted, with deals investigated on a case-by-case basis... Read more...
It should come as no surprise that Netflix is doing well, and indeed the company’s Q1 earnings report evinces just that. Revenues are up across the board--with the lone exception of its international streaming business, which is still less in the red than ever and will turn black sometime this year--and Netflix has successfully cracked into the difficult original content business, but even so, new customers will likely see a rate hike. “Our current view is to do a one or two dollar increase, depending on the country, later this quarter for new members only,” reads the report.... Read more...
Last month, Comcast and Netflix announced a controversial deal in which Netflix would pay Comcast directly for improved service. The reason this deal is controversial in many quarters is that it's seen as triple-dipping by Comcast -- the company is already paid by companies like Level 3, which provide Internet back-haul across the country, and it collects fees from subscribers too. Nonetheless, in the wake of the court case gutting net neutrality, the deal went ahead. That deal has paid off, at least in the short term -- Comcast subscribers are now seeing vastly improved performance with an average... Read more...
It seems like everybody thinks they can make great TV shows these days. Following in the formidable footsteps of Netflix and (to a lesser extent) Amazon, both Microsoft and Yahoo are looking to get into the original programming business. Yahoo’s effort in that direction, as reported by the Wall Street Journal and its anonymous sources, will take the form of 10-episode half-hour comedies as well as potentially the sort of shows that Netflix has been making, and they’ll be helmed and created by people with experience in the traditional TV industry. No deals are in place yet, but developing... Read more...
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