Items tagged with (NASDAQ:MU)

Depending on the "3D" we're talking about, it could either be amazing, or "meh". 3D gaming? Awesome. 3D movies? Meh. 3D memory? Incredible. Why? Because with 3D stacked memory technology instantly gives a hearty boost to both density and bandwidth. There's a reason both AMD and NVIDIA are going to be making use of 3D memory in their respective future graphics cards. To help put things into immediate perspective, take a look at the "gumstick" SSD in the shot above (the long card). Because of their 3D memory, Micron and Intel say that hitting 3.5TB on drives of this size will be possible. Meanwhile,... Read more...
We tend to get pretty excited about new solid state drive (SSD) announcements. Why? Well, the more SSDs that flood the market, the better the chances that prices will continue to push downwards. See where we're coming from? With that in mind, Crucial took advantage of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas to out its new MX200 and BX100 SSD lines. Starting with the former, the MX200 is built for performance on a SATA 6Gbps interface, and as such, these drives boast sequential reads and writes of up to 555MB/s and 500MB/s, respectively, as well as random reads of up to 100,000 IOPS and... Read more...
Intel today made a splash at the International Supercomputing Conference in Leipzig, Germany by revealing new details about its next-generation Xeon Phi processor technology. You may better recognize Xeon Phi by its codename, Knights Landing, which we covered in some detail earlier this year. No matter what you call it, this represents a significant leap in High Performance Computing (HPC) that will deliver up to three times the performance of previous generations while consuming less power. A big part of the reason for this is the construction of a new high-speed interconnect technology called... Read more...
The DDR4 future looms increasingly large, as Crucial announced that it’s now sampling DDR4 server memory to channel partners who are working on platforms to support the latest generation of RAM. "Memory is one of the biggest limitations when it comes to enterprise server environments,” said Michael Moreland, worldwide product marketing manager, Crucial. “Many memory-dependent server applications are crucial to the day-to-day operations of a business, but they require higher densities of memory and increased performance." He added that DDR4 will help servers run faster and more... Read more...
Micron Technology, one of the world's largest makers of DRAM and based out of Boise, Idaho, has started mass producing next-generation DDR4 memory that will support server systems based on Intel's upcoming Xeon E5-2600 v3 product family. As time goes on, we'll also see DDR4 memory appear in high-end desktops. For now, Micron is touting the improved power and performance benefits of DDR4 as being critical to the growing enterprise market. These next-generation modules will deliver a power improvement of up to 35 percent compared to standard DDR3, along with 4Gb-based DDR4 modules running at 2133... Read more...
Next generation DDR4 SDRAM is right around the corner, folks. Leading the charge is Crucial, a subsidiary of Micron, which is pushing to make DDR4 memory modules available to consumers by the end of the year. That doesn't mean you should hit the panic button and sell off your recently assembled system sporting DDR3 memory slots, but it does mean the next time you build a PC, it may sport DDR4 RAM. There are several upsides to DDR4 compared to DDR3. DDR4 offers twice as much density, allowing you to get more out of a single memory module. The smaller dies translate into more gigabits per component,... Read more...
When it comes to solid state storage, or just about any type of storage technology for that matter, there are two things you can never get enough of -- capacity and speed.  SATA-based Solid State Drives offer a good balance of both currently, as NAND Flash density continues to scale, but they can't compete with PCI Express-based SSDs, when it comes to raw bandwidth. PCI-Express SSD cards offer "direct attached" storage on a native PCIe system interface, without the need for translation to and from the SATA (Serial ATA) interface.  As a result, bandwidth bottlenecks are alleviated and... Read more...