Items tagged with (NASDAQ:INTC)

Qualcomm has faced legal hurdles in recent years for its licensing practices in both Europe and in Asia. Now, the company is coming under fire right here in the United States, and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is leading the charge. The FTC alleges that Qualcomm used its dominant position as the world’s premier supplier of mobile baseband chips to force “onerous and anticompetitive supply and licensing terms” upon smartphone manufacturers. These actions were also reportedly meant to stifle Qualcomm’s competitors in the baseband field in order to maintain its position as the top supplier. Qualcomm... Read more...
Not only is New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady the greatest of all time (GOAT) at his position—and no, that is not up for debate—he might also have a future in acting. We're not finished watching him pick apart opponents just yet, though the four-time Super Bowl champion did find time in his busy schedule to team up with Intel to create a 30-second ad spot showcasing the company's 360 Replay technology. If you're a sports fan, you may have seen this technology before, especially in basketball games. You certainly will if you tune into Super Bowl LI. The magic of presenting 360-degree replays... Read more...
Okay, so Intel's Kaby Lake lineup does not leave equivalent Skylake processors in the dust. That is a fair enough statement, though for budget buyers, there are some intriguing upgrades that Kaby Lake brings to the table. One of them is Hyper-Threading support for Pentium CPUs based on Intel's newest architecture. That is a rare amenity in the budget Pentium line, and one that was quietly introduced here.While Intel has chosen not to make a lot of noise over the including of Hyper-Threading on its lower end Pentium processors based on Kaby Lake, the Internet took notice. Intel's ARK website lists... Read more...
The annual Consumer Electronics Show – CES – is typically chock full of bleeding-edge technology. Numerous companies take advantage of CES as the backdrop to launch or announce new products, and this year's CES 2017 was no exception. But for every killer piece of technology shown off at CES, there are a dozens of chintzy unmentionables that fill the millions of square feet that comprise the show's multiple venues. The Las Vegas Convention center and virtually all of the surrounding upscale hotels and resorts are packed to gills with CES-related tech products every year. It can be tough... Read more...
A pair of researchers from Positive Technologies claim that Intel's newest generation processors are susceptible to a USB port debugging vulnerability that could allow an attacker to take over full control of a system. Starting with Skylake (and presumably Kaby Lake, though the researchers do not specifically mention Intel's 7th generation Core CPUs), Intel  U-series chips have a debugging interface that is accessible via USB 3.0 ports, and that is where the potential problem lies. The researchers say that attackers could exploit the debugging interface to bypass any security measures in place... Read more...
If you thought Intel's line of Next Unit of Computing (NUC) mini PCs or its HDMI Compute Stick were impressive feats of engineering, wait until you check out its Compute Card, a new modular compute platform that can fit a fully configured Kaby Lake PC on a slab that is about the size of credit card. This has the potential to reshape computing in many segments, both because of its small and thin size and due to its modular design. The Intel Compute Card has all the elements of a standalone PC. It features a System-on-Chip (SoC), memory, storage, and wireless connectivity, along with flexible I/O... Read more...
Samsung is no stranger to the laptop category, having served nearly every product category from Chromebooks for education on up to premium thin and light systems for professionals and mainstream users alike. But what about gaming laptops? That has been one the segment to elude Samsung, at least until now. Samsung today unveiled the Odyssey, its first notebook line for gamers There are two versions of the Odyssey, one with a 17.3-inch display with 300 nits brightness and the other with a 15.6-inch panel rated at 280 nits. Both feature a Full HD 1080p (1,920x1,080) resolution with supposedly wide... Read more...
  The reaction to Intel’s latest Kaby Lake processors from the press and enthusiast community have been somewhat mixed (to put it lightly). While overclocking abilities of the architecture are quite apparent and there’s support for technologies like Intel Optane Memory, there’s little clock-for-clock performance differentiation between Kaby Lake and its immediate predecessor, Skylake. Needless to say, some enthusiasts are sitting out this round when it comes to upgrades and are instead looking forward to the next big leap from Intel: Cannon Lake. Cannon Lake is based on a 10nm process, meaning... Read more...
Gone are the days when you needed a massive desktop tower for high end performance, especially gaming (though we still have an affinity for large systems). For those who prefer power in a compact setup, there are lots of options out there, including the new VivoPC X from ASUS. Powered by one of Intel's just-announced desktop Kaby Lake processors and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 10 series GPU, the VivoPC X packs a mean punch in a small form factor (SFF) chassis. The aggressive looking 5-liter chassis measures 2.99 x 10.23 x 11.02 inches, which is plenty small enough to slide into a home theater arrangement... Read more...
Intel is releasing a new line of "Next Unit of Computing" (NUC) devices built around its newly launched desktop Kaby Lake processor family unveiled at CES. While not a monumental leap over Skylake, Intel's Kaby Lake architecture brings with it a handful of architecture improvements and better integrated graphics, both of which are welcome upgrades in the fast growing mini PC sector.Early generation NUCs were interesting, though not necessarily exciting due to their limitations. However, NUCs have become increasingly capable little machines as of late, and for users in need of a system that can... Read more...
Gigabyte is splashing the market with more than a half a dozen gaming grade motherboards based on Intel's Z270 chipset and designed for the chipmaker's new desktop Kaby Lake silicon. The new feature-packed boards are all being marketed under Gigabyte's Aorus division, which is its premium gaming brand that up until now has been mostly associated with gaming laptops and a spattering of accessories. As we embark into 2017, it appears that Gigabyte will leverage its Aorus division to denote hardware aimed at gamers across its full spectrum of products, including laptops, peripherals (keyboard and... Read more...
As we head into this week's CES, we're expected to learn of Intel's brand-new Kaby Lake desktop processors. That leads us to ask a big question: what's next for Intel? Kaby Lake, while undoubtedly Intel's most advanced architecture to date, is a bit of an oddball in the company's portfolio as it's neither an official "tock" (architecture update) or "tick" (die shrink), due to the fact that it's been really tough to shrink these chips down further. That's the crux of all the doubt that surrounds the future of Moore's Law. For the time-being, though, Intel hopes to proove that Moore's Law isn't dead,... Read more...
We reported early last month on some rumors of a Microsoft Surface Pro 5 launch this coming spring, and now, thanks to some gabby manufacturing partners, we're now getting confirmation of that and a few other finer details. As it turns out, we might just see Microsoft launch its next flagship convertible 2-in-1 before the end of March. According to industry tracking site Digitimes, Microsoft has tasked Pegatron with handling the manufacturing responsibilities this go-around with Surface. That bodes well for Pegatron, as Microsoft also has it building its upcoming Surface Studio all-in-one... Read more...
Intel's first generation Compute Stick turned quite a few heads, including ours, as it was a remarkable thing to consider that a fully functioning PC could be crammed onto a device roughly the size of a bloated USB flash drive. It wasn't especially powerful—Intel pairing an Atom processor based on its Bay Trail-T platform with just 2GB of single-channel RAM and 32GB of onboard storage—but for $149 with Windows pre-installed (or $99 with Ubuntu) it was an intriguing device that could turn any HDMI-equipped display into a full-fledged PC. Knowing that it was on to something, Intel updated its Compute... Read more...
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