Items tagged with (NASDAQ:CMCSA)

It was with good intentions that Comcast took to Twitter to promote Comcast Cares Day, an annual event in which thousands of its employees go out and volunteer in their communities. What Comcast didn't take into account is the snarky nature of Twitter and backlash it would receive on the social network. Comcast created its own hashtag to draw attention to its philanthropic outreach effort—#ComcastCaresDay—but instead of good vibes and high fives, it attracted a mountain of mockery. Some if it came from ticked off Comcast subscribers who were taken aback by what they viewed as obvious irony, while... Read more...
Comcast has sparked the ire of customers across the country with its restrictive broadband data caps. Earlier this week, we reported that during the first half of 2015, Comcast received 863 complaints about its data caps. However, for the second half of the year, those complaints skyrocketed to nearly 8,000 as it expanded its data cap “trials” to additional markets. And it’s not just customers that are fed up with data caps; the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has also let it be known that it won’t tolerate such nonsense. In fact, the FCC stipulated that in order for Charter to win approval... Read more...
Cable ISP customers aren't real keen on Comcast's broadband data caps and they're letting the Federal Communications Commission know about it in rising numbers. In the second half of 2015, there were 7,904 complaints about data caps, up from 863 complaints in the first half of the year. As of April in this year, the total was 1,463. Comcast, one of just two outfits to earn Consumerist's "Worst Company in America" title on more than one occasion (2010 and 2014), knows it needs to do a better job satisfying customers. That's why the ISP went on a hiring spree in March of last year, at the time noting... Read more...
Comcast is now offering its gigabit Internet service in the Atlanta area to compete with Google Fiber, but in reality, it’s unfortunately not really much competition at all. For starters, Comcast is offering the service at $70 per month, which matches the Internet-only Google Fiber package, but you must signup for a restrictive three-year contract to secure that pricing. But the hits don’t stop there — if you forgo the three-year contract, you’ll pay a more princely $139.95 per month AND face monthly 300GB data caps. We hate to say it, but gigabit Internet service with a relatively low 300GB... Read more...
Following a successful trial to a single customer's home in Philadelphia, Comcast is confident that it's ready to begin deploying the world's first DOCSIS 3.1-powered gigabit Internet service to several U.S. cities. The first of these will be Atlanta and Nashville, which will receive the upgrade in early 2016, followed by Chicago, Detroit, and Miami in the second half of the year. Gigabit Internet, though relatively scarce, is far from new—companies like Google and AT&T have been expanding their fiber optic networks to offer business and residential customers 1Gbps downloads and uploads. But... Read more...
Let the confetti fly, Comcast has served up a 1Gbps Internet connection to a single home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania! Okay, maybe that isn't cause for balloons and streamers, though it's a notable achievement because the connection is the first to use a DOCSIS 3.1 modem on a customer-facing network. The significant of using a DOCSIS 3.1 modem in a customer's home is that it paves the way for 1Gbps Internet on Comcast's existing network infrastructure. It's not like competing 1Gbps (and higher) broadband roll outs that require extensive network upgrades -- all Comcast needed in this case was a... Read more...
Several Internet service providers (ISPs) have drawn the attention of the Federal Communications Commission with so-called "zero-rating" offerings, which is the practice of exempting certain services from counting against a customer's data cap. What FCC chairman Tom Wheeler wants to figure out is whether or not zero-rating services run afoul of net neutrality rules. This is a relatively new thing on the part of mobile operators. T-Mobile made waves when it introduced Binge On, which allows customers to stream an unlimited amount of video from over 20 services, including Netflix, HBO Now, Hulu,... Read more...
Comcast CEO Brian Roberts is making good on the company’s ‘Comcast Cares’ policy. For many, however, it appears that Comcast Cares more about its bottom line than about its customers. Roberts made that clear at Business Insider’s Ignition conference after he was asked point blank by the publication’s EIC, Henry Blodget, to respond to customer complaints about data caps. Roberts first tried to dance around the use of the term data caps, stating, “But they’re not a cap. We don’t want anybody to ever not want to stay connected on our network.” In other words, since Comcast doesn’t simply turn of the... Read more...
Comcast doesn’t exactly have a sterling reputation when it comes to customer service or its business practices, and its latest stunt isn’t likely to win it to win it much praise either. Comcast doesn’t take too kindly to its customers pilfering copyrighted media content, so it has taken matters into its own hands by using unencrypted browser sessions to dish out its own brand of Internet justice. If one of its customers is found to be downloading or sharing content that has been flagged as infringing on copyrighted material, Comcast uses a man-the-middle attack to inject a “popup” warning message... Read more...
Over the past week, we’ve detailed Comcast’s continued efforts to spread data caps to more of its markets in the United States. Starting December 1st, nine additional markets in the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee and Virginia, will be hit with 300GB monthly data caps. But of course, these same customers have the option of opting for unlimited data, but they will have to pay an additional $35 per month. The assumption was that Comcast was making this move because of “data hogs” that were slowing the network down for others — you know, “The needs of the man outweigh the needs of the few.”... Read more...
Comcast sure knows how to rile up its customers. As if the company didn’t have enough issues dealing atrocious customer service, it also hits seemingly random markets with pesky data caps. While some Comcast customers are able to surf the Internet unencumbered, others — like customers in Atlanta, Miami and Nashville — are strangled by 300GB data caps and overage fees if they blow past that limit. After monitoring Internet usage and listening to customer feedback in these three markets, Comcast thinks that it has the solution for customers that routinely use more than 300GB of data per month — charge... Read more...
Comcast earlier this summer announced that some of its Xfinity customers living in the Northeast would see a bump in their broadband Internet speeds at no additional cost, and we can confirm that to be true. As promised, Comcast turned the dial from 105Mbps to 150Mbps at our headquarters in Massachusetts. "We continue to increase our speeds because we know faster Internet and Wi-Fi means you can do more, enjoy more and move along with your day with a bit more ease. So, go ahead – reboot your modem to enjoy your new Blast! Internet with downstream speeds up to 150Mbps," Comcast stated in an email... Read more...
Over the past few months, Comcast has been ramping up its deployments of Gigabit Pro in select markets around the United States. Gigabit Pro, which was first announced in Atlanta earlier this year, offers customers symmetrical 2Gbps speeds, making it twice as fast as Google Fiber. However, Gigabit Pro isn’t for everyone. In addition to hefty startup costs that total $1,000 ($500 installation, $500 activation), Gigabit Pro will set you back a princely sum of $299.95 per month. With that being said, Comcast is looking to bring fiber to the masses and hopefully at a cost that’s more in line with Google... Read more...
NBC-owned and operated (O&O) stations in San Diego, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. are refusing to air an advertisement for Sling TV that paints a poor picture of the traditional pay-TV model. In response, the Dish Network-owned Internet TV provider slammed Comcast, which in turn owns NBC, in a blog post waxing angry over its censorship. "Here's the irony. The refusal to air our campaign endorses the ads' central truth: there are traditional pay TV-players that just don't get it," said Roger Lynch, CEO of Sling TV. "And what is it that they dn't get? Innovation benefits customers. Sling... Read more...
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