Items tagged with NASDAQ: GOOG

It's pretty much guaranteed that any April Fools' day is going to make you chuckle or at least smile at a joke, but for many Gmail users yesterday, April Fools' was no laughing matter at all. Before most people could even see Google's April Fools' gag "Mic Drop", we wrote about the company's decision to take it down. The idea behind Mic Drop is simple, and could in fact be useful to some if it were a real feature. Google temporarily added it as a way to effectively end a thread, even if it persists without you. It should be fair to say that most people like to get the "last word" in, and that's... Read more...
This April Fools day and like all others before it there's no shortage of good gags floating around the Web. As always, some jokes are obvious from a mile away, while others are subtle and require critical thinking. With whatever April Fools' will bring, one thing is a certainty: Google's going to have a chuckle or two up its sleeve. This year, the company announced "Mic Drop", a humorous feature in Gmail that lets you have the last word in an email chain - and then never see it again. Admittedly, this is the kind of feature that many people would actually want, even if it's not going to be entirely... Read more...
Last week, we learned about the company teaming up with others, such as Microsoft and Yahoo, to make SMTP 'Strict Transport Security' a reality, a protocol that would make it even harder for malicious users to gain access to our email. In a new blog post, the company draws our attention to SMTP STS as well as a couple of other recent (and not so recent) ways the company has improved our security. On Safer Internet Day, which happened a month-and-a-half ago, the company introduced a new Gmail feature that highlights when email is received or being sent to a domain... Read more...
With agencies like the NSA and FBI wanting to peer into our personal communications at will, we have to be proactive about keeping ourselves safe. But what if there's a fault we can't work around and simply have to live with? Unless you're a skilled developer, you have to rely on other to come up with an improved solution. All of us want to stay a step ahead of those who want to intrude on our digital lives, and thankfully, many major companies do too. The latest example is with an improvement of SMTP, an extremely popular email protocol that lets you interact with your email in real-time, unlike... Read more...
Google has been heavily invested in its self-driving car program since 2009, and has made great strides in improving the technology it has racked up over a million miles of real world testing. The self-driving fleet, which includes various Toyota Prius, Lexus RX 450h and Audi TT models, until recently has a spotless driving record. Thanks to Google’s transparency with regards to its self-driving fleet, we were quickly alerted to the first at-fault accident involving an RX 450h in its test fleet. But in the grand scheme of things, the fact we've seen only one accident - a minor one, at that - really... Read more...
It has been just over six months since YouTube Gaming was launched, and now, the company has decided to take its Twitch competitor service to the next level (pun intended, of course). At the forefront, YouTube has opened up its app availability to gamers in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland, which YouTube says are homes to popular game content creators jacksepticeye, Vanoss, and TypicalGamer. In addition to enhanced availability, YouTube has rolled out a number of changes to its app worth noting. With the Android version, live playback now has the option to stream at 60 FPS, and you can... Read more...
The amount of research that goes on inside of Google's walls (and out) at any given time is nothing short of amazing. You can be sure much of that research revolves around the mobile market, as its Android operating system didn't reach super stardom through sheer luck. With its latest move, however, Google is really taking its mobile research to heart. In fact, Google employees will soon be boarding a company van and taking a six-week trip across the United States in an attempt to lure folks in to provide their valuable insight and feedback on Google products. On the side of this van is a... Read more...
Even for mainstream users, it's not hard to tell the differences between using a PC that has its OS installed on a solid-state drive versus a mechanical hard drive. With an SSD, the OS will start up faster, while apps and multi-tasking won't bring certain processes to an absolute crawl. With SSD pricing where it is right now, it's easy to justify including one in a brand-new build (even a modest one) for the obvious speed boost.OCZ's Trion 150 SSD actually uses TLC NAND - Read Our Full Review If we can see benefits as end-users, you can imagine the benefit that flash-based storage offers companies... Read more...
If you're a fan of travel, you're probably going to love what Google has been up to lately. As we've covered many times, Google is no stranger to machine-learning and developing complex and powerful neural networks of computer resources. Now, the company has decided to focus on geography as well as testing you, not only its own neural network. Google's Tobias Weyand, with the help of other engineers, has developed a neutral network that helps pinpoint exactly where in the world a photograph was taken. For things like landmarks, this wouldn't be too complicated. But what about inside someone's... Read more...
It's not often that people feel compelled to side with Google on the topic of privacy, but the company's newest CEO, Sundar Pinchai, gives us a great reason to. As Brandon covered in great detail yesterday, Apple has been ordered by U.S. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym to provide the FBI access to an iPhone 5c that was used by the terrorists in December's San Bernardino shootings - but, there are a couple of problems with that. Apple insists that the backdoor the U.S. government wants doesn't exist, and CEO Tim Cook rages against the idea that his company should build one for any of its products. If... Read more...
Users of the Chrome beta for Android are in for a bit of a treat, as the latest version has added support for "Physical Web" beacons. Don't worry if you've never heard of these, because most haven't. Google did talk about it a bit last summer, and it seems like a feature that could be incredibly useful at times. The logic behind the name of "Physical Web" is that data is distributed locally; not over the Internet. The goal is to relay information to those nearby that would prove useful. Say, for example, you're in a restaurant, and as you wait for a seat, a beacon beams the menu to your phone so... Read more...
It seems certain that we've all managed to wind up on a website at some point in time that had misleading elements, such as fake download buttons. While piracy is going to be the first thing that springs to many minds when this kind of sketchiness is brought up, it's hardly exclusive to that area. Some websites that host completely legitimate software still have misleading advertising, and let's face it: we've been dealing with it for way too long. Well, if Google has its way, we're not going to have to worry about such misleading advertising in the future. Back in November, the company released... Read more...
This past fall, we reported on a development with Google's Project Loon, which aims to deliver Internet via balloons to underserved countries. At some point in 2016, a bunch of balloons will take flight over Indonesia, and once that happens, it could very well spearhead what could become a common sight in Internet-deprived countries. The internal group that handles Project Loon is called Google Access, and alongside Loon, this segment of Google has also been working on a different, but similar project: Project Skybender. Like Loon, Skybender involves sending objects into the sky, but unlike the... Read more...
As we've talked about a number of times in the past, Google is very keen on taking good advantage of deep-learning to help accomplish some amazing things. Its latest venture could affect us in a very direct way: by making it easier to search for specific photos in our collection. Object identification is already a big part of Google's business; it's why the company's search engine is so eerily accurate at times. It knows the difference between "small" and "large", different types of very similar objects, colors, and so forth. With a partnership with Movidius, which is headquartered in San Mateo,... Read more...
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