Items tagged with NASDAQ: GOOG

If you're a fan of travel, you're probably going to love what Google has been up to lately. As we've covered many times, Google is no stranger to machine-learning and developing complex and powerful neural networks of computer resources. Now, the company has decided to focus on geography as well as testing you, not only its own neural network. Google's Tobias Weyand, with the help of other engineers, has developed a neutral network that helps pinpoint exactly where in the world a photograph was taken. For things like landmarks, this wouldn't be too complicated. But what about inside someone's... Read more...
It's not often that people feel compelled to side with Google on the topic of privacy, but the company's newest CEO, Sundar Pinchai, gives us a great reason to. As Brandon covered in great detail yesterday, Apple has been ordered by U.S. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym to provide the FBI access to an iPhone 5c that was used by the terrorists in December's San Bernardino shootings - but, there are a couple of problems with that. Apple insists that the backdoor the U.S. government wants doesn't exist, and CEO Tim Cook rages against the idea that his company should build one for any of its products. If... Read more...
Users of the Chrome beta for Android are in for a bit of a treat, as the latest version has added support for "Physical Web" beacons. Don't worry if you've never heard of these, because most haven't. Google did talk about it a bit last summer, and it seems like a feature that could be incredibly useful at times. The logic behind the name of "Physical Web" is that data is distributed locally; not over the Internet. The goal is to relay information to those nearby that would prove useful. Say, for example, you're in a restaurant, and as you wait for a seat, a beacon beams the menu to your phone so... Read more...
It seems certain that we've all managed to wind up on a website at some point in time that had misleading elements, such as fake download buttons. While piracy is going to be the first thing that springs to many minds when this kind of sketchiness is brought up, it's hardly exclusive to that area. Some websites that host completely legitimate software still have misleading advertising, and let's face it: we've been dealing with it for way too long. Well, if Google has its way, we're not going to have to worry about such misleading advertising in the future. Back in November, the company released... Read more...
This past fall, we reported on a development with Google's Project Loon, which aims to deliver Internet via balloons to underserved countries. At some point in 2016, a bunch of balloons will take flight over Indonesia, and once that happens, it could very well spearhead what could become a common sight in Internet-deprived countries. The internal group that handles Project Loon is called Google Access, and alongside Loon, this segment of Google has also been working on a different, but similar project: Project Skybender. Like Loon, Skybender involves sending objects into the sky, but unlike the... Read more...
As we've talked about a number of times in the past, Google is very keen on taking good advantage of deep-learning to help accomplish some amazing things. Its latest venture could affect us in a very direct way: by making it easier to search for specific photos in our collection. Object identification is already a big part of Google's business; it's why the company's search engine is so eerily accurate at times. It knows the difference between "small" and "large", different types of very similar objects, colors, and so forth. With a partnership with Movidius, which is headquartered in San Mateo,... Read more...
We've been talking about Apple's secret automotive project for what feels like forever, and despite all that's been reported up to this point, the company has stuck to its guns and remains quiet on the matter. At this point, though, we must imagine that Apple has just about given up on trying to keep things a secret, as it seems we can't go a single day without seeing more proof of it. The latest bit of "proof" comes from Daimler's CEO Dieter Zetsche who recently paid a visit to Silicon Valley with other senior management members. In talking to German weekly Welt am Sonntag, Zetsche said that during... Read more...
We've talked a lot about "machine-learning" over the past couple of years, and it's for one good reason: small and large companies alike are taking it very seriously. Just a couple of weeks ago, we reported that Yahoo released a huge 13.5TB trove of data to be used for machine-learning, and at the same time, we recounted a couple of other good recent examples as well, such as Microsoft teaching computers to have a sense of humor and improved emotion detection. If you're new to the machine-learning world and don't completely understand what it actually is, the simplest description is "teaching computers... Read more...
It should strike no one as a surprise that digital video has become big business. Let be more accurate; it's a huge business. When Google purchased YouTube almost ten years ago, there were few people who truly understood what it'd become. Today it's one of the most popular websites on the planet, ranking 3rd globally (behind Google.com and Facebook.com). It's also no doubt responsible for a lot more bandwidth than most other sites out there, so it's of little surprise then that the company's Chief Business Officer sees a bright future. At CES, Robert Kyncl reiterated a couple of predictions... Read more...
For some, one of the most useful updates to hit Android 5.0 'Lollipop' was the notification tweaker. With it, you can block different types of communications when you don't want to be disturbed, but still let important stuff through. Making this feature even more useful is the ability to lift the blocks automatically at a certain time, such as in the early AM when you are getting ready for your day. This "Set until next alarm" feature is undoubtedly useful, and perhaps even important, for many. So you can imagine the faces of those who need it when they load up the notification pane and see that... Read more...
Well, this isn't something we see too often. Hot on the heels of the release of Android 6.0 Marshmallow for its Moto X Pure 2015, Motorola has decided to release the smartphone's kernel sources to the wild. As you might imagine, this isn't a move that's going to affect end-users right now. Instead, access to these sources is ideal for developers looking to do a variety of different things, including adjusting the OS, optimizing it, or overhauling the ROM entirely. With sources simply handed out like this, it makes a developer's job a bit easier. In time, this release can affect end-users once developers... Read more...
Google is no stranger to accusations of invading user privacy, but the latest one comes from Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and relates to a highly sensitive market: education. Google would like to see its Chromebooks in the hands of as many people as possible, especially in education, so it's crafted a program that helps educators integrate the devices into the curriculum, and makes their jobs easier once devices are deployed. This includes a head administrator being able to login to an interface and adjust certain settings that will affect the entire fleet en masse. This is all... Read more...
If you're a current Project Fi subscriber, you may soon be in for a little bit of a surprise. According to a slew of users on Google+, Google has begun sending out a small gift to subscribers as a way to say thanks for putting faith in its carrier business. Inside the box is an instructional booklet that says, "Thanks for your support. Let's build on this.", and once you spot the pile of LEGO inside, you'll soon get the subtle joke. Inspired by Project Fi's own colors, this LEGO can be used to build a stand that lets you set your phone down sideways while it charges. According to some users, the... Read more...
It's no secret that a countless number of mobile apps indulge in a bit more of our data than we'd like, and many even handshake with external servers, causing us to wonder what on Earth they're doing. Well, as some researchers at MIT have found out, a huge number of the top 500 apps on Google's Play Store send data back and forth that has absolutely nothing to do with the functionality of the app. Cue the eerie music. The researchers like to call this kind of communication "covert", as the fact that it's happening is completely invisible to the user. While it's easy to jump to conclusions about... Read more...
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