Items tagged with mit

It seems as though a new, promising battery tech that will boost the runtimes of our mobile devices is always just around the corner. Numerous companies and research labs make wide-eyed promises that seem unbelievable, and of course, they never deliver. However, one company, SolidEnergy, thinks that it has cracked the code when it comes to delivering longer-running batteries. And the company promises to market its batteries by the end of this year… if all goes according to plan. SolidEnergy is an MIT spinoff and says that its lithium-metal batteries can have up to double the energy capacity of... Read more...
Researchers at MIT have taken the concept of a temporary tattoo and launched it into the technology age. Using a process that creates conductive circuit designs that can be easily transferred to the surface of human skin, in addition to surface-mounted microcontrollers or LEDs, the researchers have developed user interfaces and simple displays that can be installed on human skin as wearable technology. The team at MIT is calling it DuoSkin. An NFC Capable DuoSkin Device There are three main steps in the process of creating a functional DuoSkin tattoo. First, graphic design software is used to sketch... Read more...
If augmented reality was an unknown to the world last month, it certainly isn't now, thanks to the insane popularity of Pokemon GO. That game has been responsible for opening many eyes to AR, and now, we've been seeing many comments floating about of how AR could prove more successful than VR. That's hard to argue, given everyone has a smartphone, but very few own a VR headset (which in itself will change once prices cater to the mainstream better). Well, hot on the heels of Pokemon GO's success comes MIT with one of the coolest AR projects we've ever seen. If not the coolest. The technology is... Read more...
It's been a long time since webpages consisted of simple text. Today's webpages are far more complex with audio, video, fancy graphics, JavaScript, and everything else that goes into making an enticing portal. Browser makers have done an overall good job of keeping up with the times, but researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) say they've come up with a way to turbo charge page load times by 34 percent. Their framework for faster load times is called "Polaris," not to be confused with AMD's forthcoming GPU architecture (they're two completely separate... Read more...
Could we soon see “Real Steel” or “Pacific Rim” come to life? It sure does at least look somewhat plausible, as MIT researchers have developed HERMES, an advanced robot that is capable of manipulating objects and environments in nearly the same way as humans do. But this isn’t just a project design of a robot only mimicking the actions of its human controller; it can also learn and make precise movements that weren’t possible with prior robots, thanks to its impressive sensor suite. The HERMES robot is controlled by a human operator who wears a remote controller exoskeleton. Movements carried out... Read more...
Researchers at MIT have come up with a new network design that exploits cheap, power-efficient flash memory without sacrificing the speed that supercomputing applications enjoy from Random Access Memory (RAM). What's appealing about the development is that flash memory is about ten times less expensive than RAM and consumes about a tenth as much power. The downside is that flash memory is only about a tenth as fast, though by utilizing MIT's new system, several common big data applications could use flash memory just as efficiently as conventional RAM. Not only that, the researchers presented evidence... Read more...
Developing an application isn't a cake walk, although it can seem like one if all we're talking about is getting a program up and running. Perhaps the biggest chore with developing an app is securing it tight, analyzing the code until you arrive at Eye Strain City. Security is king. It's also time-consuming. MIT knows this reality all too well, so it's decided to do something to help ease the pain. The result is a system called CodePhage, one that takes advantage of other applications to help bolster the security in its own. I wouldn't blame you if you thought that such mechanics were impossible,... Read more...
Recently, we’ve seen robots being developed that are used for security, delivering food, and even for customer service. This time around, researchers at the Biomimetic Robotics Lab of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a robot that takes its cues from the world’s fastest land animal that will hopefully be able to replace humans in dangerous operations. Called the cheetah, this robot’s form and function takes its cues from the land animal of the same name. While it can’t match the animal’s speed of 59 mph right now, the bot is capable of running at speeds of more than 10... Read more...
Well here’s one: MIT researchers are developing a way to harvest energy from, off all things, water droplets. They discovered that when water droplets spontaneously “jump” away from a superhydrophobic surface, they generate a tiny electric charge. Condensation is the real mechanism for the movement of the water, and the team figured out that by using interleaved metal plates--particularly when adjacent plates have opposite charges--they could gather that energy and send it through an external circuit, thus powering small electronic devices. This machine harvests energy from water... Read more...
Health monitoring is all the rage in the mobile market these days as evinced by giants such as Apple and Google announcing new technologies with HealthKit and Google Fit, respectively, and the growing pile of wearable devices coming to the fore. A new technology from a team at MIT could either take that trend to a whole new level--or obviate it. The CSAIL (Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory) previously developed wireless technology that can track people through a wall by emitting a low-power signal that reflects back and reveals movement, and now they’ve improved its... Read more...
As both the general public and CEOs of Internet companies seethe in the wake of NSA spying allegations, some researchers at MIT are working on a tool called Mylar that they claim would essentially spy-proof web applications. The pain point, according to the team, is the server. Every web application relies on servers for processing and storing data, but there are people with (legitimate) keys to that data as well as hackers and government snoopers. “Mylar protects data confidentiality even when an attacker gets full access to servers,” reads the researchers’ website. “Mylar... Read more...
A group of researchers at MIT have developed a proof of concept transparent display that portends a future of clear displays that are inexpensive to make and easy to acquire. The team said that some of the limitations of current transparent technologies include the inability to see projected images from more than one specific angle as well as the complexity and expense of glass equipped with built-in electronics. The technology that they’ve developed is relatively simple: they embed nanoparticles (silver, 60nm) into a plastic polymer sheet. The nanoparticles are tuned to allow all light to... Read more...
Whenever I'm passed a video and am told in advance that it's "amazing" or "unbelievable", I tend to go into it with the highest level of skepticism. Such was the case with the video of MIT's latest project, involving a shapeshifting display that you can manipulate on-the-fly, either with your hands directly or other means. To say my initial skepticism wore off quickly would be an understatement. This display, called inFORM, consists of a grid of square-tipped pillars that can shift up and down as the entire array is manipulated either by your hands or other objects thanks to the help of cameras.... Read more...
Everyone perceives warmth or coldness a bit differently; for proof, just stroll through any cubicle farm and note that while one person is wrapped in a blanket, someone a few doors down is loosening his tie and holding a tiny fan to cool down. Wearable technology may be part of the solution to that problem. A team of four engineering students at MIT developed a thermoelectric bracelet that’s powered by a lithium polymer battery and is designed to keep individual wearers at their preferred temperature. The device monitors both skin and air temperature and sends small pulses of warm or cool... Read more...
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