Items tagged with mit

Researchers at MIT have come up with a new network design that exploits cheap, power-efficient flash memory without sacrificing the speed that supercomputing applications enjoy from Random Access Memory (RAM). What's appealing about the development is that flash memory is about ten times less expensive than RAM and consumes about a tenth as much power. The downside is that flash memory is only about a tenth as fast, though by utilizing MIT's new system, several common big data applications could use flash memory just as efficiently as conventional RAM. Not only that, the researchers presented evidence... Read more...
Developing an application isn't a cake walk, although it can seem like one if all we're talking about is getting a program up and running. Perhaps the biggest chore with developing an app is securing it tight, analyzing the code until you arrive at Eye Strain City. Security is king. It's also time-consuming. MIT knows this reality all too well, so it's decided to do something to help ease the pain. The result is a system called CodePhage, one that takes advantage of other applications to help bolster the security in its own. I wouldn't blame you if you thought that such mechanics were impossible,... Read more...
Recently, we’ve seen robots being developed that are used for security, delivering food, and even for customer service. This time around, researchers at the Biomimetic Robotics Lab of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a robot that takes its cues from the world’s fastest land animal that will hopefully be able to replace humans in dangerous operations. Called the cheetah, this robot’s form and function takes its cues from the land animal of the same name. While it can’t match the animal’s speed of 59 mph right now, the bot is capable of running at speeds of more than 10... Read more...
Well here’s one: MIT researchers are developing a way to harvest energy from, off all things, water droplets. They discovered that when water droplets spontaneously “jump” away from a superhydrophobic surface, they generate a tiny electric charge. Condensation is the real mechanism for the movement of the water, and the team figured out that by using interleaved metal plates--particularly when adjacent plates have opposite charges--they could gather that energy and send it through an external circuit, thus powering small electronic devices. This machine harvests energy from water... Read more...
Health monitoring is all the rage in the mobile market these days as evinced by giants such as Apple and Google announcing new technologies with HealthKit and Google Fit, respectively, and the growing pile of wearable devices coming to the fore. A new technology from a team at MIT could either take that trend to a whole new level--or obviate it. The CSAIL (Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory) previously developed wireless technology that can track people through a wall by emitting a low-power signal that reflects back and reveals movement, and now they’ve improved its... Read more...
As both the general public and CEOs of Internet companies seethe in the wake of NSA spying allegations, some researchers at MIT are working on a tool called Mylar that they claim would essentially spy-proof web applications. The pain point, according to the team, is the server. Every web application relies on servers for processing and storing data, but there are people with (legitimate) keys to that data as well as hackers and government snoopers. “Mylar protects data confidentiality even when an attacker gets full access to servers,” reads the researchers’ website. “Mylar... Read more...
A group of researchers at MIT have developed a proof of concept transparent display that portends a future of clear displays that are inexpensive to make and easy to acquire. The team said that some of the limitations of current transparent technologies include the inability to see projected images from more than one specific angle as well as the complexity and expense of glass equipped with built-in electronics. The technology that they’ve developed is relatively simple: they embed nanoparticles (silver, 60nm) into a plastic polymer sheet. The nanoparticles are tuned to allow all light to... Read more...
Whenever I'm passed a video and am told in advance that it's "amazing" or "unbelievable", I tend to go into it with the highest level of skepticism. Such was the case with the video of MIT's latest project, involving a shapeshifting display that you can manipulate on-the-fly, either with your hands directly or other means. To say my initial skepticism wore off quickly would be an understatement. This display, called inFORM, consists of a grid of square-tipped pillars that can shift up and down as the entire array is manipulated either by your hands or other objects thanks to the help of cameras.... Read more...
Everyone perceives warmth or coldness a bit differently; for proof, just stroll through any cubicle farm and note that while one person is wrapped in a blanket, someone a few doors down is loosening his tie and holding a tiny fan to cool down. Wearable technology may be part of the solution to that problem. A team of four engineering students at MIT developed a thermoelectric bracelet that’s powered by a lithium polymer battery and is designed to keep individual wearers at their preferred temperature. The device monitors both skin and air temperature and sends small pulses of warm or cool... Read more...
Given the revelations of the NSA’s data-gathering program coupled with the fact that if you use essentially any Internet services your data is out there and capable of being mined, more users than ever are looking for ways to thwart the prying eyes of power that be. One solution, called openPDS, has been developed by the MIT Media Lab’s Human Dynamics group and ID3, and it’s designed to allow users to “collect, store, and give fine-grained access to their data all while protecting their privacy”. The concept is to give users a Personal Data Store (PDS) where all of... Read more...
It’s deeply disconcerting, to say the least, that the NSA has been able to extract data about U.S. citizens from Internet companies using the secret (until recently) PRISM program. Because all of those companies likely handle data a little differently, it’s hard to say how much information the government is able to extract from email records, but a tool called “Immersion”, developed by MIT, shows you what your Gmail account can say about you. Immersion uses the same data that the government would have access to if it requested it from Google; it’s metadata, which includes... Read more...
Programmer/activist Aaron Swartz has been arrested for data theft in connection with an incident that occurred at MIT in late 2010. Swartz is accused of downloading nearly five million documents from JSTOR, an online, non-profit academic journal archive system. The particulars are as follows: Swartz, who has a history as a political advocate and founded the group Demand Progress, was granted access to JSTOR as part of a fellowship at Harvard University's Center for Ethics. He therefore had the undisputed right to access JSTOR content--though not, as the filing notes, the authority to download the... Read more...
For those of us with bad vision (really bad, in our case), the optometrist is an annual ritual. The researchers at the Camera Culture team at MIT's Media Lab have developed an Android application to make optometry nearly a self-diagnostic procedure. What they have developed is an app that uses a set of lines and dots that a user manipulated while looking through a $2 “eye” which was created out of the technology of a holographic barcode scanning device previously developed by MIT. Before you ask, it's Android only. What a patient does is to continue to adjust the image things comes... Read more...
A faster Internet has been a dream for many, and it has been a continually changing dream as broadband speeds got faster and faster. When 56k was the norm, just getting an ISDN line was a huge step-up. From there, ADSL or cable was another leap forward. Today, we need fiber to get things even faster, and while many universities and companies have tons of bandwidth on tap, we all yearn for something even quicker. Leave it to one of the brightest institutions in the world to find a way. A group of MIT researchers led by Vincent Chan, the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Professor of Electrical Engineering and... Read more...
1 2 3 4 5 Next