Items tagged with Malware

Apple might have one of the most secure app stores on the planet, but as with all things secure, someone is bound to find a hole and waltz right on in. Such is the case with whomever modified Apple's official coding software Xcode to bundle malware with any app compiled with it. That sounds simple, but despite the origin being China, this malware is far-reaching. According to security firm Palo Alto Networks, a malicious version of Xcode was released to Chinese networks about six months ago. While the software is free to registered developers, some users in China took advantage of this unofficial... Read more...
Ransomware is one of the most sickening types of malware out there, and one enterprising person (or group) has managed to take things to a new level: by bringing porn into it. According to research firm Zscaler, this latest piece of malware is designed to sucker people into downloading a dedicated porn player simply called "Adult Player". We're not sure of the promises made, but I'd imagine that anyone who downloads it would hope that it would act as a portal for some free porn - or perhaps just add features that porn enthusiasts demand from a video player. Nonetheless, once the player is installed,... Read more...
If you take the plunge to root (or "jailbreak") a mobile device, it enters you into a world where software exists that wants nothing more than to ruin your day. Or perhaps even your device. On the Android side, malware has popped up on occasion, but iOS has seemingly been relatively safe. But an exception has just been made, thanks to a piece of malware dubbed "KeyRaider". As its name suggests, all your keys are belong to this malware. According to security firm Palo Alto Networks, over 225,000 iOS jailbroken iOS devices have been plagued by this malware, and while it's primarily sourced from a... Read more...
Whenever a chip maker comes out with a new processor or System-on-Chip (SoC) design, the first thing everyone wants to know is how fast it is. Clockspeeds and benchmarks underscoring raw compute power draw the most attention, though there's more to a processor than speed alone. For example, Qualcomm today revealed that its forthcoming Snapdragon 820 will real-time, on-device machine learning designed to detect zero-day malware threats. It will be the first platform to incorporate what Qualcomm is calling Snapdragon Smart Protect, which itself will be the first application to use Qualcomm Zeroth... Read more...
Kaspersky Lab is defending itself against accusations that it tricked competing antivirus services into damaging their clients’ computers. The Russian anti-malware software developer is well-known for its security software, but faces stiff competition from the likes of Avast, AVG, McAfee, Microsoft and Symantec. Anonymous sources claiming to be former Kaspersky employees went public with criticism of the company recently, alleging that Kaspersky poisoned a data pool that security companies share in an attempt to undermine their credibility with customers. Not surprisingly, Kaspersky is a bit prickly... Read more...
Adobe's Flash platform is running out of friends. You may recall that a few weeks ago Mozilla disabled Flash by default in its Firefox browser due to the discovery of multiple critical vulnerabilities, and around the same time, Facebook's chief security officer urged Adobe to set a kill date for its buggy API. Expect more of those sentiments following a recent week long attack on Yahoo's ad network. Security outfit Malwarebytes discovered the "malvertising" campaign, which kicked off on July 28. It involved hackers purchasing ads across Yahoo's various sites and then injecting them with malicious... Read more...
Windows 10 is off to a blazing fast start. The last official count had Windows 10 installed on more than 14 million devices in its first 24 hours, and unofficially there are now more than 67 million PCs and hybrids running the new OS. So naturally the bad guys are looking to capitalize on the situation, which they're doing via a nefarious ad campaign.As you know, Windows 10 is a free upgrade for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users. Since Microsoft is doling out the upgrade in phases, there are millions of eligible people still waiting their turn, and that's what the malicious email campaign is based... Read more...
You might think that given the reaction consumers had after Lenovo was found to be installing malware on customer PCs, other vendors would think twice about doing the exact same thing. Not Samsung, it seems, as it's just been discovered that the software updater tool it bundles with its notebooks takes it upon itself to keep Windows Update disabled. Windows Update is perhaps the most important tool that ships with Windows, as it's directly responsible for patching bugs directly related to the OS -- and there are a lot of them. If these bugs don't get patched, it means that the user is left vulnerable,... Read more...
Leading antivirus firm Kaspersky Lab said that it recently suffered a security breach involving at least three techniques that it had never seen before. The AV company described the attack as "one of the most sophisticated campaigns ever seen," though it believes it was able to detect the intrusion at an early stage, thereby mitigating the damage."This highly sophisticated attack used up to three zero-day exploits, which is very impressive -- the costs must have been very high," Costin Raiu, director of Kaspersky's global research and analysis team, said in a statement.The sneaky malware used... Read more...
It seems that it was just yesterday that someone had to know a thing or two about software and programming to wreak havoc on fine upstanding Internet citizens via malware incursion. Ah, the good old days. Nostalgia aside, though, one cannot help but feel rattled by the news that security researchers at McAfee have discovered new software with which the oh-so-nefarious out there can easily construct their own ransomware. And not only is such a product in the wild, but it is online software, too, accessible by anyone capable of navigating a keyboard and a TOR browser. ... Read more...
If you thought that there couldn't possibly be more unbelievable stories to stem from Edward Snowden's leaks, you're sorely mistaken. Today, we learn of a truly appalling effort that the NSA and its partners worked together on to intercept Android users' connections to install malware and soak up information. The NSA's partners in crime are part of a group called 'Five Eyes', and in addition to the US, included countries are Canada, the UK, New Zealand, and Australia. Given other revelations that have trickled out in the past, this list shouldn't come as much of a surprise. The UK's GCHQ, which... Read more...
Given the incredible modding scene that surrounded Grand Theft Auto IV, it seemed inevitable that GTA V would follow suit. So far, that seems to be the case, although it will probably take some time before some of the best mods will be seen. Nonetheless, with prospects of great mods also comes prospects of other people trying to ruin your day, by giving you something extra with that mod. At GTAForum, user aboutseven notes that their PC was recently infected with malware, and after investigating, found that the source was a popular GTA V mod called Angry Planes. Since the post was made, many others... Read more...
Security firms and anti-malware providers sure do have their work cut out for them, a fact that seems to get emphasized every day. As attackers become more creative, researchers have to dig deep in order to understand how malware manages to hide itself so well. It used to be that static scanners would be suitable enough, but that's hardly the case nowadays. Attackers are becoming even more creative, creating almost ninja-like malware. Take Rombertik, for example. This is a piece of malware that was deeply analyzed by Cisco's Talos Security Intelligence and Research Group that at the high level... Read more...
Anyone who has driven an Android smartphone any distance whatsoever has no doubt wondered whether any of the apps they use could be serving as information conduits. The relaxed vetting process that the Google Play Store has in place ('relaxed' versus the jailer-esque process in use by those minding Apple's app store) results in their stocking all but the most obviously malicious apps, after all, so a little suspicion in the mix just makes sense. So is this neat new Find Parking app that just asked for location privileges pushing data on my movements into some database somewhere? Will personal... Read more...
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