Items tagged with Malware

Purchasing a new laptop can sometimes be a chore. For starters, simply finding one that's "right for you" takes time and effort, and once you do find it, you know that the "chore" part isn't over. Once you get that baby home, you'll have to begin mentally preparing yourself for the inevitable bloatware removal. Bloatware is nothing new, and by this point, it's a given. Our notebooks could be more expensive if not for bundled apps, so for some, taking a few minutes to uninstall whatever's included might not seem like a bit deal. However, it's been discovered that Lenovo has been pushing boundaries... Read more...
When anti-virus / anti-malware mobile apps began hitting the market a handful of years ago, I couldn't have imagined wanting to install one. After all, who wants to install anything that will use up some of their phone's precious resources? Well, times have changed, as I'm starting to believe that those who download many apps - especially from unknown developers - should consider grabbing a protection app. If you need a good reason, we can use Avast's brand-new example. The security firm recently investigated an issue involving a trio of apps that were available via the Google Play Store. Normally,... Read more...
When engaged in war, it's of utmost importance to keep plans and secrets secure. On the other side of the coin, it's likewise important to do what you can to gather intelligence on the opposition -- something quite difficult given the obvious fact that the opposition is also doing its best to keep its secrets, secret. But lest we forget that there are sometimes much easier ways to get information you need. Sometimes it can involve social engineering of the most modest levels, because after all, the bearers of this important information are still human. Hackers targeting the Syrian opposition (an... Read more...
One of the more interesting stops on our recent trip to Amsterdam was at The Hague Security Delta. For those of you who might not be aware, The Hague is the name of the government seat of the Netherlands (and yes, the article is capitalized). The Hague Security Delta (HSD) is the official title of a collaborative effort between Netherlands businesses, the government, and multiple research institutions to identify emerging security threats, share best practices, and foster collaboration between industry, governments, and universities. One of the most interesting topics that came up during our visit... Read more...
It would seem that the ones responsible for hacking Sony Pictures Entertainment in a massive ransomware attack weren't just a bunch of script kiddies hiding out in a basement somewhere. That wasn't really a prevailing theory anyway, but lest there's any doubt about the seriousness of the security breach, the FBI is now warning businesses in the U.S. to be on high alert for signs of the same malicious software. The warning came by way of a five-page, confidential document provided to businesses late last night. It contained technical details about the newest malware threat, along with tips on how... Read more...
If you have Flash Player installed, and chances are pretty overwhelming that you do, you'll want to make sure that you're equipped with the latest and greatest version. Last month, Adobe issued a Flash update that blocked certain exploit kits from being able to take advantage of a user's PC, but as it turns out, that update wasn't enough to prevent against new related exploits in the future. This update, as you'd expect, helps take care of that. Adobe lists these versions as vulnerable: Adobe Flash Player 15.0.0.223 and earlier versions Adobe Flash Player 13.0.0.252 and earlier 13.x versions... Read more...
Symantec made the unsettling announcement today that it has discovered sophisticated malware that has been operating successfully on and off since 2008. Named Regin, the malware launches in a series of stages and is designed to avoid detection at each stage. Symantec hasn’t identified the organization that created Regin, but says that its sophistication, its targets, and the amount of time that would be needed to create it suggest that a nation state is responsible. Image Credit: SymantecRegin’s first stage is a Trojan. Once launched, the malware goes through several stages, each of which is encrypted.... Read more...
A recently discovered vulnerability in iOS set off panic alarms due to the nasty nature of it. Security researchers warned that malicious apps installed using enterprise/ad-hoc provisioning would be able to replace legitimate apps on a user's iOS device. Dubbed "Masque Attack," it prompted a warning from the U.S. government, setting off even more alarms. Apple's response? Chill out. We're paraphrasing, of course. Apple's official response is a bit more lengthy and boils down to advising iOS users to only download apps from trusted sources like the App Store. The Cupertino outfit also advised paying... Read more...
Are you sure that app on your iPhone is legitimate? If you've been careful not to fall for phishing scams, then chances are you're right. However, there's a new malware targeting iOS that's capable of spoofing and even overwriting legitimate apps you've downloaded from Apple's App Store, such as Gmail, for example. How on the heels of the nasty WireLurker malware that's been infesting iOS devices, mobile security researchers at FireEye say they've discovered that an iOS app installed using enterprise/ad-hoc provisioning could replace genuine apps installed on your phone, so long as both apps used... Read more...
When people think about Internet security, they still think of the various bugs, flaws, and malware that pervade the online world as a Windows problem. Macs have long enjoyed special status thanks to limited market share, while smartphones aren't generally considered to be an attack vector, no matter which OS you prefer. That's clearly changing -- a new report from Palo Alto Networks illustrates how a new Trojan they call WireLurker doesn't just infect iOS devices -- it relies on Mac OS X vulnerabilities to do so. WireLurker contains a bevy of firsts and achievements. It's the largest malware to... Read more...
In the summer, we learned of a severe issue that plagues a countless number of USB devices, tying into an exploit later called "BadUSB". Thanks to the efforts of Karsten Nohl, chief scientist at SR Labs, it was exposed that the firmware on many USB devices could easily be reprogrammed; the level of security on them turns out to be minimal, or non-existent. Firmware is effectively the brain of a USB device, so if it can be reprogrammed, it doesn't take much imagination to understand what could happen. While Nohl has an exploit that demonstrates the issue, he's refused to release it to the public,... Read more...
Avast, makers of the self-titled free antivirus software (along with paid Internet security suites), has discovered that the "Tinba Banker" Trojan is back in circulation, and this time it's targeting more than two dozen financial institutions in the United States. There are some big names among them, including Bank of America, HSBC, TD Bank, Chase, Wells Fargo, PNC, and more. This nasty piece of malware sneaks its way onto customer PCs through the Rig Exploit kit, which takes advantage of Flash or Silverlight exploits. Unfortunately for the victim, he or she can fall prey to the Trojan simply by... Read more...
Some Steam users are waking up to an unpleasant surprise after falling for a scam on Amazon's Twitch streaming service. According to the security gurus at F-Secure, there's an insidious piece of malware going around that involves a Twitch-bot bombarding the service's chat channels with invites to participate in a weekly raffle. The supposed raffle offers users a chance to win various prizes, such as Counter Strike: Global Offensive weapons. However, it's not a legitimate raffle. The link provided by the Twitch-bot loads up a malicious Java program that asks for the user's name, email address, and... Read more...
We reported a week ago today that Home Depot is the latest retailer to be struck by a security breach, and at the time, it seemed certain that the attack was similar to the one cast on Target last year. As it turns out, that happens to be the case, with the point-of-sale malware "BlackPOS" at the root of it all. According to KrebsOnSecurity, which broke the news last week, modified BlackPOS malware infected some Home Depot stores. This malware is designed to siphon information from the credit card after it's swiped, and it supposedly only affects POS machines running Windows. What's worrying is... Read more...
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