Items tagged with Malware

Despite Google's best efforts to protect its users who download apps from its Play Store, some malware inevitably slips through the cracks. While it might be easy to assume that most of that malware is found in obscure software that people shouldn't be downloading anyway, this latest case is proof that if malware does manage to get through, it could impact millions of people. Research firm Zscaler, and its threat-hunting team ThreatLabz, recently discovered an app on the Play Store that included the Android spyware SMSVova. Looking at the image below, it's hard to imagine why anyone would fall... Read more...
The latest bombshell to come out of WikiLeaks’ Vault7 series of leaks from the CIA, exposes a tool codenamed “Grasshopper”, which allows operatives to deploy persistent surveillance and hacking payloads on target Windows-based computer systems and remain undetected from popular anti-malware and anti-virus tools.WikiLeaks has an array of documentation on-line, including an in-depth user’s guide for Grasshopper. The user’s guide explains that Grasshopper is “a software tool used to build custom installers for target computers running Microsoft Windows operating systems”, which seems straightforward... Read more...
There are lots of obvious examples of how IoT (Internet of Things) connected and smart devices can enrich our lives. However, as we've noted numerous times over the past year, there are a number of caveats that can also come with them. The glaring issue of course has to do with security, or the lack of it really. And perhaps the absolute lack of ownership certain manufacturers take with it and their products. Research firm Radware once helps underscore the glaring need for better IoT security with some hard proof about what we're dealing with. Employing a "honeypot" approach... Read more...
It is pretty well known that Android devices are often the target of malware outbreaks due to the open nature of the software platform and also because it is by far the most prolific mobile operating system in use around the globe. In most cases, this malware finds its way onto a device after it is in the hands of its new owner, but a new report suggests that some Android smartphones are making their way to customers with dangerous software packages already installed. Researchers at Check Point have discovered that malware has been found on 38 different Android models that were owned by a “large... Read more...
It’s no secret the Epic founder Tim Sweeney hates Microsoft’s Universal Windows Platform (UWP), which he has made clear on many occasions. UWP, which in essence is a replacement for the venerable Win32 API, is increasingly being used for Windows games, and is the only way to distribute gamers through the Windows Store. The unified codebase allows for game developers to consolidate resources, making it easier to create titles that can run equally well on Windows 10 PCs and the Xbox One gaming console. However, Sweeney isn’t buying into what Microsoft is selling. “Microsoft has launched new PC Windows... Read more...
A full-blown Skynet situation might be the thing of science fiction (we hope, anyway), but that doesn't mean bizarre things involving machines can't happen. As proof of this, Verizon teased an entry in its upcoming 2017 Data Breach Digest that describes a recent DDoS attack on an unnamed university involving vending machines, light bulbs, and 5,000 Internet of Things (IoT) devices. As with many DDoS attacks involving IoT devices, this one is the result of system administrators being a little too lax with security on these seemingly benign devices. The university in question dismissed complaints... Read more...
For what we're sure are obvious reasons, Google has long blocked certain types of attachments from being sent through its Gmail service. Those include .bat (Windows Batch), .exe (Windows executable), and .msc (Microsoft Management Console). Soon, .js (JavaScript) will be joining the prohibited ranks. This is the kind of feature update that's needed, although it's not one that's going to please those who need to legitimately send JavaScript files, such as developers or IT staff. However, given the kind of damage any sort of scripts can cause, it's hard to disagree with Google's decision here. If... Read more...
It appears that the first Mac malware discovery of 2017 belongs to "Quimitchin", a strange little find that targets, of all things, scientific research. The "strange" part of the malware comes from the fact that it features system calls that have long been deprecated, or at least haven't been relevant for quite some time. It's also not designed to wreak havoc, but rather act as an effective spy. Quimitchin was discovered by an IT admin who noticed that one particular Mac had more than the usual amount of network activity. Thanks to the help of Malwarebytes, the culprit was found, and its nickname... Read more...
As if hackers do not already have an easy enough time duping Internet users into forking over personal information, it turns out that browser autofill profiles may be helping them out when they're supposed to be making things more convenient for the person who inputted his information. By implementing hidden fields on a website, an attacker can turn an autofill profile against the user, in a manner of speaking.Here is the deal with autofill profiles, they're a relatively new feature of today's browsers that allow users to input information about themselves that are commonly of interest to legitimate... Read more...
With a name like 'KillDisk', it's not hard to imagine what the malware it represents sets out to accomplish. Add on a good helping of ransomware, and KillDisk becomes the kind of malware that can give people nightmares, and not to mention a lot of undue stress. In the past, KillDisk malware has infected computers in the industrial sector, with the goal of rendering servers or desktops essentially unbootable. This was accomplished not only by deleting files, but renaming others. In effect, it's designed to create a very bad day for the person who has to deal with the mess. Recently, it's been discovered... Read more...
Malware writers continue to find ways to make themselves out to be bigger scumbags than they already are. The latest dirty trick by the worst the web has to offer is a new twist on ransomware. Instead of simply encrypting the files on an infected PC and demanding a ransom in order to decrypt them, a variant called Popcorn Time encourages victims to infect others by offering a free key if they can get spread the ransomware to two other people.I wouldn't rank this as a new low in malware and its authors—that distinction belongs to the soulless jerks who injected a script into the Epilepsy Foundation's... Read more...
If you currently are in possession of a Google account (and who isn’t these days), you might want to pay close attention to the findings of researchers at Check Point. According to Check Point, new malware is making the rounds under the name Gooligan. Gooligan’s main attack vector is through Android-based smartphones, attacking users that have downloaded infected apps. Once Gooligan finds its way onto an Android smartphone or tablet, it proceeds to root the device and then downloads additional payloads to compromise email accounts and steal authentication tokens. But that’s not all, the malware... Read more...
It's been quite some time since malware-laden images have been a major security issue, but the risk is still out there. The attack vector has been exploited recently through a couple of leading social networks: Facebook and LinkedIn. The attack, named "ImageGate" by researchers at Check Point, takes advantage of misconfiguration in these two social networks to make it so that when an image is loaded into a browser, it'll automatically download to the machine. This is similar to going to a download page where after 5 seconds, the download will begin. The difference here is that the downloaded file... Read more...
A cloud security outfit is warning that a new ransomware strain called Stampado has emerged from the underground market and is wreaking havoc on systems. What makes Stampado stand out from the crowd is that it is available on the dark web for only $39 with a full lifetime license. That makes it one of the least expensive and most accessible ransomware strains out there.Don't be fooled by Stampado's low price tag, the ransomware strain is capable of doing big time damage. As is often the case with malware, Stamapado typically arrives on system through spam emails or drive by downloads. It installs... Read more...
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