Items tagged with Malware

A full-blown Skynet situation might be the thing of science fiction (we hope, anyway), but that doesn't mean bizarre things involving machines can't happen. As proof of this, Verizon teased an entry in its upcoming 2017 Data Breach Digest that describes a recent DDoS attack on an unnamed university involving vending machines, light bulbs, and 5,000 Internet of Things (IoT) devices. As with many DDoS attacks involving IoT devices, this one is the result of system administrators being a little too lax with security on these seemingly benign devices. The university in question dismissed complaints... Read more...
For what we're sure are obvious reasons, Google has long blocked certain types of attachments from being sent through its Gmail service. Those include .bat (Windows Batch), .exe (Windows executable), and .msc (Microsoft Management Console). Soon, .js (JavaScript) will be joining the prohibited ranks. This is the kind of feature update that's needed, although it's not one that's going to please those who need to legitimately send JavaScript files, such as developers or IT staff. However, given the kind of damage any sort of scripts can cause, it's hard to disagree with Google's decision here. If... Read more...
It appears that the first Mac malware discovery of 2017 belongs to "Quimitchin", a strange little find that targets, of all things, scientific research. The "strange" part of the malware comes from the fact that it features system calls that have long been deprecated, or at least haven't been relevant for quite some time. It's also not designed to wreak havoc, but rather act as an effective spy. Quimitchin was discovered by an IT admin who noticed that one particular Mac had more than the usual amount of network activity. Thanks to the help of Malwarebytes, the culprit was found, and its nickname... Read more...
As if hackers do not already have an easy enough time duping Internet users into forking over personal information, it turns out that browser autofill profiles may be helping them out when they're supposed to be making things more convenient for the person who inputted his information. By implementing hidden fields on a website, an attacker can turn an autofill profile against the user, in a manner of speaking.Here is the deal with autofill profiles, they're a relatively new feature of today's browsers that allow users to input information about themselves that are commonly of interest to legitimate... Read more...
With a name like 'KillDisk', it's not hard to imagine what the malware it represents sets out to accomplish. Add on a good helping of ransomware, and KillDisk becomes the kind of malware that can give people nightmares, and not to mention a lot of undue stress. In the past, KillDisk malware has infected computers in the industrial sector, with the goal of rendering servers or desktops essentially unbootable. This was accomplished not only by deleting files, but renaming others. In effect, it's designed to create a very bad day for the person who has to deal with the mess. Recently, it's been discovered... Read more...
Malware writers continue to find ways to make themselves out to be bigger scumbags than they already are. The latest dirty trick by the worst the web has to offer is a new twist on ransomware. Instead of simply encrypting the files on an infected PC and demanding a ransom in order to decrypt them, a variant called Popcorn Time encourages victims to infect others by offering a free key if they can get spread the ransomware to two other people.I wouldn't rank this as a new low in malware and its authors—that distinction belongs to the soulless jerks who injected a script into the Epilepsy Foundation's... Read more...
If you currently are in possession of a Google account (and who isn’t these days), you might want to pay close attention to the findings of researchers at Check Point. According to Check Point, new malware is making the rounds under the name Gooligan. Gooligan’s main attack vector is through Android-based smartphones, attacking users that have downloaded infected apps. Once Gooligan finds its way onto an Android smartphone or tablet, it proceeds to root the device and then downloads additional payloads to compromise email accounts and steal authentication tokens. But that’s not all, the malware... Read more...
It's been quite some time since malware-laden images have been a major security issue, but the risk is still out there. The attack vector has been exploited recently through a couple of leading social networks: Facebook and LinkedIn. The attack, named "ImageGate" by researchers at Check Point, takes advantage of misconfiguration in these two social networks to make it so that when an image is loaded into a browser, it'll automatically download to the machine. This is similar to going to a download page where after 5 seconds, the download will begin. The difference here is that the downloaded file... Read more...
A cloud security outfit is warning that a new ransomware strain called Stampado has emerged from the underground market and is wreaking havoc on systems. What makes Stampado stand out from the crowd is that it is available on the dark web for only $39 with a full lifetime license. That makes it one of the least expensive and most accessible ransomware strains out there.Don't be fooled by Stampado's low price tag, the ransomware strain is capable of doing big time damage. As is often the case with malware, Stamapado typically arrives on system through spam emails or drive by downloads. It installs... Read more...
When services are provided for free, it's important to evaluate whether or not there's a major caveat that comes along with it. According to an investigation by CBS News, the free "PC Health" checkup provided by Office Depot carries a big one: you could be encouraged to shell out money to fix a nonexistent problem. If this sounds like a shady mechanic or cars salesman, it's essentially the same thing. Office Depot is accused of telling customers that there are serious issues on their PCs, such as installed malware, even when that's not the case, and can charge them upwards of $180 for the privilege... Read more...
Google has a message for webmasters serving up malware and it goes something like this: Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Going forward, Google is plugging what it calls a "gap" in its online protection scheme that allowed sites serving up malicious content to become repeat offenders without much repercussion or warning to users. In the past, sites that ran afoul of Google's "Malware, Unwanted Software, Phishing, and Social Engineering Policies" were temporarily branded with a warning to users. The brand would remain until Google could verify that the site is no longer serving... Read more...
Getting hit with ransomware, a form of malware that encrypts your files and holds them hostage until you pay the hacker responsible to decrypt them, is no laughing matter, at least if you're the victim. But for cyber crooks becoming ever more brazen, the temptation to taunt victims and security researchers is sometimes too much. That's been the case with the person responsible for the DXXD ransomware. DXXD is a nasty bit of code that's been going after servers for the past couple of weeks. Luckily there are good guys out there that act as security super heroes. One of them is Michael Gillespie,... Read more...
What do you usually find in your mailbox? Love letters? Bills? People in Victoria, Australia are finding malware-laden USB drives in their mailboxes, or “letterboxes” as they are called down under. The Victoria police warned citizens about the malicious USB drives, stating, “The USB drives are believed to be extremely harmful and members of the public are urged to avoid plugging them into their computers or other devices.” Once the USB drives are plugged into a computer, they load a fake media streaming service as and create some “serious issues” for users. It is unclear what exactly is on the... Read more...
If you operate a Web server that runs on Linux, we're here to give you a bit of a prod in case you haven't updated it in a while. A piece of ransomware called FairWare is floating around, and as you'll soon see, its name is ironic as it's anything but "fair". Reports are coming in of users who have been struck with this awful type of malware, although it doesn't seem clear at this point exactly how the infection takes place. It's also not clear if this is some sort of automated attack -- one that simply scans the internet at large and infects where it can -- or if the attacks are focused. Either... Read more...
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