Items tagged with MakerBot

A class action lawsuit filed against Makerbot and its parent firm Stratasys alleges a "fraudulent scheme" to knowingly ship shoddy 3D printers. According to the lawsuit, Makerbot and its employees were aware that the company's 5th generation Replicator 3D printer was full of problems, but went ahead and shipped them anyway in order to maintain an artificially inflated stock price. As the allegation goes, the scheme backfired, resulting in a deluge of customer complaints, product returns, and warranty service. Sales then plummeted, and the company's stock price followed suit, leaving both investors... Read more...
Readers of HotHardware are no doubt aware of the impact that 3D printers are having on the world, as well as the fact that they're rapidly growing in popularity. The layman might not understand this, though, so when a big chain store decides to bring some units into select locations, and start selling them online, it's a pretty big deal. MakerBot's Replicator Desktop 3D Printer The focus of the latest deal is Home Depot, which has begun selling MakerBot's Replicator online, along with a number of accessories. In addition, 12 stores located in California, Illionois, and New York, will soon... Read more...
MakerBot announced a new line of 3D printers at CES that run the gamut from smallish and more affordable to large (and less affordable, for the average Joe). The latter is now shipping, and MakerBot believes that it’s more than just a big 3D printer. “This is a massive scale for a 3D printer and comparable to 3D printers that cost tens of thousands of dollars more,” said MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis in a press release. “We believe that the MakerBot Replicator Z18 is going to disrupt the industry in that it enables 3D printing of large-scale and complex prototypes and models that... Read more...
MakerBot has a whole new line of 3D printers, and the littlest sibling in the bunch, the MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D, is now shipping. “As soon as we announced the MakerBot Replicator Mini, we received calls and orders from customers who couldn’t wait to purchase this easy and affordable 3D printer,” said Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot, in a press release. “We see the MakerBot Replicator Mini as a turning point in the 3D printing industry.” Specifically, Pettis sees the Mini Compact 3D as a true home 3D printer instead of the larger devices that are better-suited... Read more...
Makerbot’s making them both big and small these days. Just weeks after beginning orders for the Replicator Mini Compact 3D printer, Makerbot announced that the big brother of its new line of 3D printers, the Z18, is available for purchase. Whereas the Mini Compact offers a petite build volume of 10x10x12.5 inches, the Z18 can handle 2,592 cubic inches of build with dimensions of 12x12x18.5 inches. The Z18 is Makerbot’s largest 3D printer to date, and it comes with an optional Makerbot Cart ($1,250) for moving it around and Makerbot Filament Case ($750) that holds XL and XXL spools to... Read more...
The smallest member of MakerBot’s 3D printing platform, announced at CES, is now available to order at MakerBot’s website or at one of the company’s three store locations in New York, Boston, and Greenwich, CT. The Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printer (the build volume is 10x10x12.5 inches) is designed to be easy to use with features such as One Touch printing, plug-and-play capabilities, a no-leveling build plate, and included free software. The printer offers a 200 micron resolution and is optimized for MakerBot PLA filament (available in 17 colors) and connects easily to Thingiverse... Read more...
MakerBot brought the noise as well as the funk, as it were, to CES this year. The company, which is now a subsidiary of Stratasys, announced a trio of new 3D printers as well as new apps and a digital online store. With its 5th generation of 3D printers, MakerBot is bringing three machines to market with the MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printer ($1,375), Replicator Desktop 3D Printer ($2,899), and Replicator Z18 3D Printer ($6,499). MakerBot 5th Generation 3D Printers All three use the new MakerBot Replicator 3D Printing Platform, which includes an easily swappable Smart Extruder, an onboard... Read more...
As we mentioned earlier today, Microsoft is really on board this whole 3D printing thing, loading Windows 8.1 with native 3D printing capabilities and working closely with MakerBot to develop a driver for the latter’s Replicator 2 3D printer, but that’s not all. Microsoft also now has an app called 3D Builder that lets users more easily set up a design for 3D printing. 3D Builder, which is available for free in the Windows Store starting today, lets users manipulate existing designs stashed in the app’s library or upload their own designs made in other applications. Features include... Read more...
When Microsoft announced its eagerly anticipated Windows 8.1 update, the company promised native 3D printing support. MakerBot worked with Microsoft to develop its own 3D printer driver for the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D printer, which is now available via the Windows Update Service. The MakerBot 3D Printer Driver will enable users to print in 3D from within capable software applications just as you’d print any document. MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis said that the company worked closely with Microsoft to produce a driver that would be plug-and-play ready. It sounds like Microsoft got something... Read more...
Makerbot is ready to make the push beyond hobbyists, makers, and engineers and into the schools, exciting and educating the next generation of kids about 3D printing. The company, which is now owned by Stratasys, announced an initiative to put a MakerBot 3D printer in every school in the country. The MakerBot Academy initiative is a partnership with America Makes and Autodesk, and the group has lofty goals in mind--namely, ensuring that the next industrial revolution happens in the U.S. and is driven by the innovations of 3D printing. MakerBot cited President Obama’s call to action in the... Read more...
For consumers, the 3D printing market is developing rapidly, and recently one of the vectors for growth has been on the 3D scanning side of things. Industry mainstay MakerBot and upstart Rubicon have both announced consumer-oriented 3D scanners in the last few months, and now 3D Systems (maker of the Cube 3D) has one, too. The Sense 3D Scanner presents a totally different approach to 3D scanning than MakerBot and Rubicon; while the other two have users place an object on a rotating disc, the Sense is a handheld device that you can pass over just about anything, from a small object to a full-size... Read more...
It was not very long ago that most people had never heard of 3D printing, but suddenly 3D printing retail locations are beginning to crop up on street corners here and there. It was just last year that MakerBot opened a retail location in New York City, and more stores are coming. For example, there’s Deezmaker 3D Printers & Hackersapce in Pasadena, CA; The 3D Printing Store in Denver, CO and Englewood, CO; GetPrinting3D in Evanston, IL and Dayton, OH; and HoneyBee3D in Oakland, CA. That’s not to mention iMakr and several locations of The Color Company in the UK and iGo3D in Germany.... Read more...
MakerBot debuted its Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner, an intriguing machine that costs $1,400, but an upstart competitor is working on a device called the Rubicon 3D Scanner that will cost a mere $200. The Rubicon uses a webcam (which is not actually included with the scanner) that takes a series of photos with the device’s lasers on and off; the turntable rotates 0.45 degrees 800 times to get the full image, and the whole process takes about 3 minutes. It can accommodate objects as large as 160mm in diameter and 250mm in height. The fellow behind the project, Robert Mikelson, appears to have... Read more...
A company called AIO Robotics announced that it will be launching a Kickstarter campaign on September 4th to raise money for a 3D printer that also offers 3D “copying” (i.e., 3D scanning), and 3D faxing. (Yes, 3D faxing, as in you could “fax” someone a 3D file that would automatically print on their 3D printer. The use case on that seems quite narrow, although we suppose that if it’s perfected, it could have some benefit over time.) The printer may be given the name “Zeus”. More notable features of this prototype include that it will run on its own ARM-based... Read more...
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