Items tagged with Legal

The patent case between Apple and Samsung--you know, the one where if Apple wins, the company assumes total dominance of the mobile device market and Samsung dries up and blows away--is a bare-knuckle legal slugfest, and it recently took an interesting turn. Samsung brought forth videotaped testimony from one Roger Fidler (Program Director for Digital Publishing at the University of Missouri’s Reynolds Journalism Institute), who asserted that he’s been working on tablet designs since 1981, and according to Bloomberg, that in the mid-1990s, “Apple personnel were exposed to my tablet... Read more...
"Rampant patent litigation." If you've followed consumer technology for any small amount of time, you'd know that it's happening. Apple vs. Samsung. Yahoo vs. Facebook. HTC, Motorola, Google -- you name it. If it's a large tech company, it's probably worried somewhat about being sued over patents. Companies that are involved don't seem to be making any grandiose public claims about this misfortune. But the tech media, and consumers at large, are growing tired of the back-and-forth. And you know it's bad when even a entity as large and hulking (and busy) as the International Telecommunication Union... Read more...
Ouch. Toshiba is the latest panel maker to feel the pinch after being fined a whopping $87 million by a U.S. jury in a price fixing verdict. This week, Toshiba and its subsidiary, Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. (TAEC), announced that a jury in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California (San Francisco) issued a verdict against Toshiba in the amount of $87 million due to alleged antitrust practices in the LCD business. It's just one of many companies found guilty over the past few years, and Toshiba is making clear that it expects to not pay for any of it.... Read more...
Nope! That's the answer given to Apple by the International Trade Commission, shutting down its hopes for an emergency ban against HTC products. It's actually one of only a few "No!" responses heard on the legal front lately, as Judge Koh managed to give Apple the ability to halt sales of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 and the Galaxy Nexus pending the outcome of the whole shebang. Now, the U.S. ITC has ruled that HTC can continue to import smartphones while the agency "investigates whether the phones violate an order that the Taiwanese company stop infringing an Apple." The claim is that HTC is still in violation... Read more...
A disturbing stream of reports have been circulating concerning employers demanding the Facebook passwords of potential employees before hiring them. Aside from the fact that such a demand is a gross breach of privacy and frankly opens those employers up to legal liability for all sorts of reasons, it’s just a crappy thing to do. The job market is tough, and plenty of desperate job seekers would do, say, or sign just about anything to land a job, and apparently some employers know that and are taking advantage of their leverage. We know--it’s easy to become indignant upon reading this... Read more...
A few weeks ago, Amazon.com dropped associates in California due to a new sales tax law. Needless to say, this action made many loyal Amazon users and sellers unhappy. Many people blamed the state of California while others placed blame on Amazon. Regardless of which party you chose to blame, the fact is, the accounts for Amazon associates in California have been terminated. Now, Amazon.com is seeking a ballot initiative that could repeal the California law that requires online retailers such as Amazon to collect sales tax. The California attorney general's office received a petition on Friday.... Read more...
Performing certain actions will get you sent to the 'Big House' no matter where you live. Taking another person's life, for example. Robbing a bank. Stampeding across town in a drunken stupor without your clothes on at three o'clock in the afternoon (trust us on this one). But in Tennessee, you could be locked up for logging into your buddy's Netflix account and watching an episode of The Twilight Zone. According to a report in The Tennessean, state lawmakers passed a new bill endorsed by Gov. Bill Haslam that, come July 1, will make it a crime to use someone's login information to watch movies... Read more...
Nokia has been under a great deal of pressure lately to perform strong. The company has lagged behind major smartphone vendors, and they're starting to lose their massive grip on the worldwide cellphone market. Their low-end phones still dominate sales in many developing nations, but in North America, the iPhone and lots of Android phones have lapped Nokia's N8 and other high-end, Symbian-based solutions. But that hasn't stopped the company's legal team from being on top of their gae. Nokia has announced this week that they have filed claims in the UK High Court, Dusseldorf and Mannheim District... Read more...
When we first caught wind of this story, we thought maybe there was some kind of bizarre oral fixation that prompted a New York resident to toss a perfectly good USB thumb drive into his mouth and swallow it like a Tylenol. As it turns out, Florin Necula was simply trying to destroy evidence seized during a federal raid.We've seen this tactic in several spy movies, and we're guessing so did Necula. But what Necula didn't take into account was how much more durable portable flash drives are compared to paper, which is a lot easier to digest. But more on that in a minute.First, let's discuss for... Read more...
Thinking of using those newfound hacking skills to engage in nefarious behavior? Think again. Albert Gonzalez is a name that'll go down in hacking history, but it's not for anything positive. After being charged with stealing some 130 million credit and debit card numbers, Albert plead guilty to previous data-theft charges in New York and Massachusetts. His penalty? Aside from dealing with a stream of media coverage, he'll be forced to cough up $1.65 million in assets. Oh, and then there's a little thing called "jail time." He'll be dealing with 15 to 25 years of that, after Federal prosecutors... Read more...
Seriously folks, we couldn't make this stuff up if we tried. In fact, this is the stuff that pure comedic gold is made of. Duke Nukem Forever, which is arguably the most highly hyped game to never emerge in official fashion, was thought to extinguished forever when 3D Realms (its developer) went under earlier this month. Weeks later, the game has resurfaced in conversation yet again, further proving the point that this title simply will not ever die. According to a blurb over at Bloomberg, Take-Two Interactive Software, which makes the heralded Grand Theft Auto series of video games, has sued Apogee... Read more...
We feel like we've been here before, and in fact, we have. Sort of, at least. The same hotly debated video game law in California has come to the forefront of attention once more, with a federal appeals court striking down the law that sought to bar minors from purchasing or renting games that were deemed too violent. The 9th United States Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the original 2005 law "violates minors' rights under the Constitution's First and 14th amendments." The three judge panel's unanimous ruling upholds an earlier ruling in the United States District Court. If it would have passed,... Read more...
While we're hardly in favor of the Senate's approval of a four month delay on the has-to-happen-sometime digital TV transition, this is one political agenda we can definitely stand behind. Reportedly, United States lawmakers are mulling a plan that would provide tax credits for Internet and wireless companies as part of a "broad stimulus package to boost the ailing economy."Specifically, AT&T, Comcast, T-Mobile and Sprint were named as examples, though any firm with the willingness and ability to "build out high-speed Internet in rural and underserved areas" could soon see a 10 percent tax... Read more...
MP3 is a lossy format - meaning you lose quality from the original. Because of that fact, wording in a recently passed Italian law may have just made trading MP3 files legal.The law states that music or images that are at "degraded or low resolution" can be distributed on the Internet "for scientific or educational use, and only when such use is not for profit," according to a rough translation.Experts that have reviewed the law told the Italian daily La Repubblica that even though MP3's are not specifically mentioned, the fact that the word degraded is used implies the existence of that format,... Read more...
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